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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2021

Sandra De Groote and Jung Mi Scoulas

This study examines differences in library use patterns (in-person visits, online use, reference transactions, library resource and services use) pre-COVID-19 and during…

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377

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines differences in library use patterns (in-person visits, online use, reference transactions, library resource and services use) pre-COVID-19 and during the COVID-19 pandemic through multiple data sets.

Design/methodology/approach

Using library statistics collected during 2017/2018 and 2020/2021 and student responses to a biennial library use survey distributed in 2018 and 2021, the potential impact of the pandemic on users' behaviors was explored.

Findings

Library use statistics and the biennial survey responses demonstrate that users' overall library use was impacted by COVID-19. Both the library's gate count and students' frequency of library visits showed a dramatic decrease. The use of virtual support to patrons increased during COVID-19 as reflected by the increase in email and chat reference interactions and virtual consultations.

Practical implications

As students return to the physical classroom, observing library use via various data will help inform how well use of the library rebounded or if there are changes in users' behavior that suggest the need for the promotion of library services or an expansion in alternative services to support users.

Originality/value

This article highlights the importance of continuously obtaining various data sets to observe trends and changes. By observing multiple data points, some changes are aligned across data, whereas other changes or patterns are different. While impact on physical library use may be obvious, library use before and during the pandemic will help guide and inform how academic libraries should be prepared for hybrid environments post-pandemic.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 49 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 7 May 2019

Beyza Aksu Dunya and Sandra De Groote

The purpose of this paper is to explain how an academic library’s Student Experience Survey was revised and improved based on available research on survey design…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain how an academic library’s Student Experience Survey was revised and improved based on available research on survey design methodology and piloting efforts. Thus, it aims to contribute existing literature on library assessment and survey methodology by addressing issues of planning and coordinating assessment. The paper also provides a guideline on the survey revision process for existing instruments.

Design/methodology/approach

The library assessment coordinator collaborated with Assessment Coordinator Advisory Committee (AC2) to revise and improve the survey. The revision process started with adding suggested items and constructing new items based on library assessment planning survey administered to library faculty previously. Regular monthly meetings were held with the committee to facilitate the revision process. Multiple facets of the survey implementation were revised including wording, content, order and format of the items, response scales and survey distribution. Each facet was addressed based on available research on survey methodology and cross-checked with the committee members.

Findings

The revised 2018 University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) Libraries Student Experience Survey consists of a total of nine items with response matrices, single choice response format and open-ended response format to measure students’ satisfaction, need and their use of the various library resources and services. The changes made to the survey are grouped into three categories: wording and content, response categories and scaling and design, font and layout. The revision process of the UIC Libraries Student Experience Survey can serve as an example for academic or other types of libraries that wish to track and report their impact regularly.

Originality/value

The UIC Libraries Student Experience Survey provides evidence that careful revision and piloting as well as obtaining relevant stakeholder buy-in to the process lead to build effective survey tools.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2014

Scott P. Pitol and Sandra L. De Groote

The growing dominance of Google Scholar (GS) as a first-stop resource for scholars and researchers demands investigation of its influence on citation patterns, freedom of…

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1193

Abstract

Purpose

The growing dominance of Google Scholar (GS) as a first-stop resource for scholars and researchers demands investigation of its influence on citation patterns, freedom of information, and scholarly communication. The purpose of this paper is to break new ground in understanding the various versions GS indexes, correlations between the number of GS versions and citation counts, and the value of institutional repositories for increasing scholarly impact.

Design/methodology/approach

GS listings for 982 articles in several academic subjects from three universities were analyzed for GS version types, including any institutional repository versions, citation rates, and availability of free full-text.

Findings

First, open access articles were cited more than articles that were not available in free full-text. While journal publisher web sites were indexed most often, only a small number of those articles were available as free full-text. Second, there is no correlation between the number of versions of an article and the number of times an article has been cited. Third, viewing the “versions” of an article may be useful when publisher access is restricted, as over 70 percent of articles had at least one free full-text version available through an indexed GS version.

Originality/value

This paper investigates GS versions as an alternative source for a scholarly article. While other articles have looked at GS through various lenses, the authors believe this specific aspect of the topic has not been previously explored.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2014

Sandra L. De Groote and Mary M. Case

The purpose of this paper is to outline the evolution of University of Illinois at Chicago’s (UIC) journal hosting service from the initial phase of setting up a server to…

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273

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline the evolution of University of Illinois at Chicago’s (UIC) journal hosting service from the initial phase of setting up a server to host journals through to the point of offering a suite of library publishing services. The UIC has been hosting Internet-based journals since the 1990s.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, challenges and steps taken for inclusion in PubMed, archiving in PubMed Central and developing policies and parameters of support are discussed.

Findings

Venturing into the world of Library as Publisher is not the decision that should be taken lightly, but supporting affordable scholarly publishing, when successful, is rewarding.

Originality/value

This paper will be of value to libraries considering offering journal hosting services.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

Jiaqin Yang and Richard H. Deane

The importance of reducing product lotsizes in converting traditional job shops into just‐in‐time (JIT) type manufacturing systems has been addressed in the literature…

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2096

Abstract

The importance of reducing product lotsizes in converting traditional job shops into just‐in‐time (JIT) type manufacturing systems has been addressed in the literature. This paper presents a lotsize reduction model for closed stochastic production systems. The model is formulated based on an M/G/c queuing lotsize model. Product lotsize choice is related to all major components of job flow time: waiting time in queue, batch processing time, batch moving time, and finished goods warehousing time. The research is motivated by the fact that an optimal lotsize solution that minimizes only average job waiting time in the shop may not be optimal when the effects of job batch processing time, batch moving time, and batch warehousing time are also considered. There is no general closed form solution to the model due to the complexity of its nonlinear formulation. Based on the unique properties of the model, heuristic solution procedures are developed. The research demonstrates opportunities for shop managers to significantly reduce product lotsizes while minimizing total operating cost.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 13 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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