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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Richard W. Joyner

The external examiner (EE) is the most important arbiter of whether a student’s submission earns the research degree for which it is entered. Based largely on personal experience…

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Abstract

The external examiner (EE) is the most important arbiter of whether a student’s submission earns the research degree for which it is entered. Based largely on personal experience as a research degree examiner and administrator, suggests that there are two main characteristics that should be required of any potential external examiner: they should be sufficiently aware of the intellectual frontiers of their subject that they can judge whether the thesis makes a contribution to knowledge or scholarship sufficient to justify the award; and they should also be mature adults, of enough humanity to ensure that the examination process is a worthwhile and developmental experience for the candidate, irrespective of the outcome. Argues that there are thus two principles that underlie the successful selection of an external examiner (EE): institutions should have carefully constructed regulations defining the qualifications and experience expected of the EE, and a scrutiny framework sufficient to ensure that they are followed; and supervisory teams have a duty to prepare and inform themselves well in advance of the selection of external examiners. Ways in which these principles can be made effective will be discussed and current practice at Nottingham Trent University outlined.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Abstract

Details

American Life Writing and the Medical Humanities: Writing Contagion
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-673-0

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 17 May 2021

Abstract

Details

The Role of External Examining in Higher Education: Challenges and Best Practices
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-174-5

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Richard Boyatzis, Kylie Rochford and Kevin V. Cavanagh

Little research has explored the importance of interpersonal skills, and more specifically, emotional and social intelligence (ESI) competencies for an engineer’s effectiveness or…

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Abstract

Purpose

Little research has explored the importance of interpersonal skills, and more specifically, emotional and social intelligence (ESI) competencies for an engineer’s effectiveness or engagement. Furthermore, to the knowledge, no studies have explored the explanatory power of ESI over and above general mental ability and personality for engineers. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study the authors gathered multi-source data for 40 engineers in a multi-national manufacturing company.

Findings

The authors found that ESI as observed by their peers significantly predicted engineer effectiveness (ΔR2=0.313), while general mental ability (g) and personality did not. In the same study, an engineer’s engagement in their work was significantly predicted by the degree of shared vision within their teams, while g, personality and ESI did not predict engagement.

Research limitations/implications

The authors explore the implications of the findings for corporate training and development, undergraduate education, and graduate education of engineers.

Originality/value

The authors draw on 30 years of longitudinal studies showing ESI and quality of relationships can be significantly improved with the appropriate pedagogy emphasizing the building of one’s vision, developmental approaches to ESI, developing a shared vision with others, and inspirational coaching.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Archie B. Carroll and Jill A. Brown

The purpose of this chapter is to introduce and provide an overview of the topic of corporate social responsibility (CSR). The approach is to present an introduction to the…

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to introduce and provide an overview of the topic of corporate social responsibility (CSR). The approach is to present an introduction to the importance of the topic and a review of the concept’s evolution and development which includes an exploration of the topic’s meaning and competing and complementary frameworks which are related. Among these related concepts are the following: business ethics, stakeholder management, sustainability, corporate citizenship, creating shared value, conscious capitalism, and purpose-driven business. These concepts are frequently used interchangeably with CSR, and they have more in common than differences. At their core, each embraces value, balance, and accountability. The chapter also explores a number of key research avenues that are quite contemporary. Among these, the following topics are addressed: political CSR; the CSP–CFP relationship and business case for CSR; upstream/downstream CSR; CSR in emerging economies, corporate social activism, and corporate social irresponsibility. In the final analysis, it is argued that the topic of CSR continues to be on an upward and sustainable trajectory in both conceptual development and practice.

Book part
Publication date: 14 September 2020

Virginia Munro

To determine the new responsibility and new form of CSR required in an evolving ecosystem, this chapter covers the historical evolution of CSR including the various additional…

Abstract

To determine the new responsibility and new form of CSR required in an evolving ecosystem, this chapter covers the historical evolution of CSR including the various additional labels CSR has attracted, and its many surrogate, complementary, and alternative terms and themes. Some parties still view CSR as just a form of Philanthropy; however, current definitions for CSR involve many components, which have adapted over time. The new CSR definition provided by the European Commission in 2011, for example, mirrors some of the changes created by the inclusion of the sustainable development goals (SDGs) in 2015. The creation of shared and integrated value and the ongoing development of the social enterprise industry are further developments, alongside the growing trend toward B-Corp registration, the increasing emphasis on ‘business-for-purpose’ and the rise of the ‘be the change’ movement. This chapter discusses this journey and reveals how CSR has followed a cycle of social movements through several industrial revolutions. As we head toward the Fourth Industrial Revolution and usher in the new era for Globalization 4.0, this requires new business models, new labels, and new adaptations of CSR. These concepts are introduced in this chapter and developed further in later chapters.

Details

CSR for Purpose, Shared Value and Deep Transformation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-035-8

Abstract

Researcher Highlight: Dr. Carter G. Woodson (1875–1950)

Details

Black American Males in Higher Education: Diminishing Proportions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-899-1

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

June D. Parker

As the Communist influence in the world subsides, the threat of low‐intensity conflict increasingly becomes a major concern to those involved in maintaining world security and…

Abstract

As the Communist influence in the world subsides, the threat of low‐intensity conflict increasingly becomes a major concern to those involved in maintaining world security and peace. The fall of the Berlin Wall and the collapse of the Soviet Union have been accompanied by shifts in alignments, the emergence of old conflicts and new tensions, and an increase in Third World agitation. These events all serve to create these low‐intensity conflicts, which may take the form of guerrilla warfare, coups d'etat, ethnic violence, terrorism, resistance movements, or insurgency. Terrorism by itself is the objective of many forms of violence prevalent in today's world, including drug‐related incidents and incidents involving street gangs, hate groups, violent activists, and separatist organizations, as well as state‐sponsored actions in places such as Central and South America, the Middle East, and Libya. Conflict within areas may create situations that have far‐reaching consequences.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Book part
Publication date: 17 July 2011

Karen J. Jansen and David A. Hofmann

In a series of studies, we develop and validate an approach to studying momentum fluctuations over the course of organizational change to better understand the dynamics of change…

Abstract

In a series of studies, we develop and validate an approach to studying momentum fluctuations over the course of organizational change to better understand the dynamics of change processes. The first study experimentally examines momentum fluctuations in a controlled change context and explores individual predictors of variance in momentum. The second study utilizes a real organizational setting, examining organizationally relevant predictors of momentum variance and the ability of momentum trends to predict meaningful organizational outcomes. Combined results provide evidence that momentum mapping is a valid approach for researchers and managers exploring processes that unfold over time.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-022-3

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1935

Under this heading are published regularly abstracts of all Reports and Memoranda of the Aeronautical Research Committee, Reports and Technical Notes of the U.S. National Advisory…

Abstract

Under this heading are published regularly abstracts of all Reports and Memoranda of the Aeronautical Research Committee, Reports and Technical Notes of the U.S. National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, and publications of other similar research bodies as issued

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 7 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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