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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2021

Silke Op de Beeck, Marijke Verbruggen, Elisabeth Abraham and Rein De Cooman

This paper examines home-to-career interference (HCI), i.e., the extent to which employees perceive that their private life has constrained their career decisions to date, from a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines home-to-career interference (HCI), i.e., the extent to which employees perceive that their private life has constrained their career decisions to date, from a couple perspective. Building on scarcity theory, the authors expect higher levels of HCI among couples that need more and have less resources and, within couples, among the partner who is most likely to take care of home demands. Therefore, the authors explore the role of children and social support as between-couple differences and gender, relative resources and work centrality as within-couple differences. Moreover, the authors examine how one partner's HCI is related to both partners' life satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses are tested using hierarchical linear modeling and APIM-analysis with a sample of 197 heterosexual dual-earner couples (N = 394).

Findings

As hypothesized, employees in couples with more children and less social support reported more HCI. No support was found for within-couple differences in gender, educational level or work centrality. Next, HCI was negatively related to employees' own life satisfaction but not to their partner's life satisfaction.

Originality/value

The authors enrich the understanding of HCI by examining this phenomenon from a couple perspective and shed light on couple influences on career experiences.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 February 2012

Rein De Cooman and Roland Pepermans

This paper aims to use the signaling theory and the person‐organization fit framework as a rationale to study value‐related information prospective applicants receive from…

4001

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to use the signaling theory and the person‐organization fit framework as a rationale to study value‐related information prospective applicants receive from employers through the communication in job ads.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyzed the content of 1,768 job advertisements published in two national and two regional Dutch‐speaking magazines in Belgium. Four independent judges coded all information in the offer section and categorized it into five content categories adopted from Lyons and colleagues. Since important sectoral distinctions exist in terms of structural‐operational as well as value‐related characteristics, this study examines how profit and nonprofit organizations portray themselves in the offer section of the job advertisements they send out.

Findings

Generally inconsistent with the authors' assumptions, the results show that intrinsic and prestige values are more intensively reported in job ads from the profit sector, whereas altruistic and extrinsic values are brought up more in job ads from the nonprofit sector. However, because nonprofit organizations print smaller, often non‐colored ads in the national language, additional analyses controlling for these factors confirmed only one of the sectoral differences. Nonprofit organizations seem to compensate for values that are obvious in their sector (i.e. altruistic and intrinsic) by more intensively emphasizing extrinsic values (e.g. insurance and fringe benefits) compared to profit organizations.

Originality/value

Only part of the information provided in the earliest phase of the recruitment process reflects the values one would expect based on organizational theory and empirical evidence. This, obviously, engenders an important threat to the establishment of person‐organization fit.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 April 2020

Katrien Vandevelde, Elfi Baillien and Guy Notelaers

This study tested whether person-job fit (PJ-fit), person-group fit (PG-fit) and person-organization fit (PO-fit) relate to exposure to and enactment of workplace bullying (WB)…

Abstract

Purpose

This study tested whether person-job fit (PJ-fit), person-group fit (PG-fit) and person-organization fit (PO-fit) relate to exposure to and enactment of workplace bullying (WB), mediated by strain and conflict.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 1,077 employees were analysed using multiple mediator structural equation modelling (Mplus 8.0).

Findings

PJ-fit, PG-fit and PO-fit all related to WB. PG-fit accounted for most explained variance. PJ-fit, PG-fit and PO-fit related to bullying through strain; only PG-fit also related to bullying through conflict.

Research limitations/implications

PE-fit is valuable to parsimoniously investigate WB's multi-causal nature; and strain and conflict partially explain the associations. Future research may shed more light on the direction of these effects.

Practical implications

So far, scholars assumed that job design prevents WB (work-environment hypothesis). This study revealed that prevention should also focus on the fit between employee and group/organization.

Social implications

WB has high societal costs. The authors introduce a new angle to WB prevention. To counteract WB, practitioners should also look at PJ-fit, PG-fit and PO-fit. This is not only important for recruitment, but also for tenured employees (e.g. because of changes in employees' needs, the job, the group or the organization).

Originality/value

This study was the first to investigate the multi-causal nature of both WB exposure and enactment, by applying the lens of PE-fit, and testing explanatory mechanisms.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 December 2018

Maeve Clancy and Carol Linehan

The purpose of this paper is to explain some divergent findings on experiences of fun at work. It explains conflicting findings by moving from a focus on classifying the activity…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain some divergent findings on experiences of fun at work. It explains conflicting findings by moving from a focus on classifying the activity (as, e.g. task/managed/organic) to foregrounding the dynamics of the experience, adding to the growing conceptualisation of fun at work as a multi-dimensional construct.

Design/methodology/approach

This research draws on empirical data obtained through case study and interviews with 13 participants from two organisations. These interviews were subjected to intense thematic analysis.

Findings

It was found that an individual’s underlying beliefs about the organisation; the perceived drivers of the fun practice; and the level of control exerted over a fun practice significantly shape the experience. The paper draws on the concept of the psychological contract to frame the relationship between these three key interacting elements.

Practical implications

This paper provides a greater understanding of the dynamics of fun experiences, enabling management to better recognise and contextualise the impact of fun practices.

Originality/value

Given conflicting findings on both the experience and outcomes of fun at work, this study elucidates the dynamics underpinning the experience of fun at work. It is novel to consider experiences of fun through the lens of psychological contracts, which offers fresh insight into the understanding of individual experiences of fun.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 41 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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