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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

David Rosenbaum, Elizabeth More and Peter Steane

The purpose of this paper is to identify the development of planned organisational change models (POCMs) since Lewin’s three-step model and to highlight key linkages between them.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the development of planned organisational change models (POCMs) since Lewin’s three-step model and to highlight key linkages between them.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 13 commonly used POCMs were identified and connections with Lewin’s three-step framework and associated process attributes were made, reflecting the connections between these models and Lewin.

Findings

The findings show that first Lewin’s three-step model represents a framework for planned change; however, these steps could not be viewed in isolation of other interrelated processes, including action research, group dynamics, and force field analysis. These process steps underpin the iterative aspects of his model. Second, all 13 POCMs have clearly identified linkages to Lewin, suggesting that the ongoing development of POCMs is more of an exercise in developing ongoing procedural steps to support change within the existing framework of the three-step model.

Research limitations/implications

The authors recognise that the inclusion of additional POCMs would help strengthen linkages to Lewin. The findings from this paper refocus attention on the three-step model, suggesting its ongoing centrality in planned organisational change rather than it being dismissed as an historical approach from which more recently developed models have become more relevant.

Practical implications

This paper presents opportunities for organisational change management researchers to challenge their thinking with regard to the ongoing search for model refinement, and for practitioners in the design and structure of POCM.

Originality/value

An analysis of the ongoing relevance of Lewin and his linkage with modern POCMs assist in rationalising the broadening, and often confusing literature on change. This paper therefore not only contributes to filtering such literature, but also helps clarify the myriad of POCMs and their use.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2018

Yvon Dufour, Peter Steane and Anne Marie Corriveau

The purpose of this paper is to build on the configurational approach to strategic thinking – with the “écocycle” framework – to advance the understanding of the organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to build on the configurational approach to strategic thinking – with the “écocycle” framework – to advance the understanding of the organizational life cycle. This integrative approach brings new insights into the dynamism of organizational life cycle.

Design/methodology/approach

This framework builds on analysis of the literature on organizational life cycle and extensive consulting and teaching experience with business executives.

Findings

The framework highlights the complex and dynamic nature of thinking and decision making in organizations. It suggests a spectrum of multiple ways of thinking over time, as strategy changes to accommodate each organization’s challenging environment.

Originality/value

The “ecocycle” framework progresses the understanding of organizational life cycle, by incorporating the diverse factors and features into a more unified, holistic and synthetic approach. The framework challenges the linear sequential view of organizational life cycle, and suggests the process of strategy development is not comprised of independent forms or alternative choices, but rather different business practices of organizations aligned with different stages of the strategic thinking cycle.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 10 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Learning from International Public Management Reform: Part A
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-0759-3

Abstract

Details

Learning from International Public Management Reform: Part A
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-0759-3

Abstract

Details

Learning from International Public Management Reform: Part B
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-093-7

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Peter Steane

This paper argues that divergence rather than convergence is manifested in non‐profit governance in non‐profit boards in Australia. This reinforces broader literature on…

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Abstract

This paper argues that divergence rather than convergence is manifested in non‐profit governance in non‐profit boards in Australia. This reinforces broader literature on governance undertaken in other countries, and suggests expectations of convergence are premature. The inclusion of more women as directors, together with a greater proportion of directors from minority groups in society, supports a view of directorship dissimilar from the corporate sector. Such divergence offers a contribution to the theory and practice of governance because it suggests that policies of convergence need to be built upon a realistic assessment of the ideologies and values that characterise the non‐profit sector.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 September 2009

Yvon Dufour and Peter Steane

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Abstract

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Teerapun Chaimongkonrojna and Peter Steane

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the Full Range Leadership Development Program (FR-LDP) of middle managers of a furniture company in Thailand and explore how…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the Full Range Leadership Development Program (FR-LDP) of middle managers of a furniture company in Thailand and explore how they experience the leadership development phenomenon. It addresses the fundamental question of how effective leadership behaviors occur and are sustained.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 31 middle managers completed a six-month multi-methods development program of three alternating training sessions and on-the-job practice. A 360-degree feedback survey of the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire 5X Short, comprising 284 questionnaires of “leaders” and “raters,” was used to measure the change in effective leadership behaviors and the overall leadership outcome. A sub-sample of 20 participants from these managers was selected for in-depth interviews at the end of the intervention. Semi-structured interviews and critical incident analysis was applied to understand the leadership experience of these managers.

Findings

The study revealed that leadership behavior and overall outcome performance had improved over the course of the FR-LDP. The program did contribute positively to individual learning. Sustained effectiveness was not due solely to the development or intervention process, but also on individual objectives and action, together with supervisor interest and support.

Research limitations/implications

The study provides a valid, in-depth insight into leadership in Thailand, which has practical application. However, the size of the sample may not be sufficient for broad generalizations in other cultural contexts or environments.

Originality/value

The study extends the understanding of how middle managers develop transformational leadership in Thailand. The study contributes to how middle managers learn what they need to know, how they get to know it and factors that influence their practice of transformational leadership in their workplace. The findings provide to organizations options on resources, talent retention and sustaining organizational performance.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 34 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 October 2009

James Guthrie, Peter Steane and Federica Farneti

The paper aims to study and compare the Australian Red Cross Blood Service (ARCBS) annual (AR) and intellectual capital reports (ICR) with an earlier study. The paper seeks to…

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Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to study and compare the Australian Red Cross Blood Service (ARCBS) annual (AR) and intellectual capital reports (ICR) with an earlier study. The paper seeks to analyse the reporting practices of intellectual capital (IC) within this organisation.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study organisation is an Australian not‐for‐profit (NFP) organisation and the study took place over three years. A content analysis of ARCBS AR and ICR between 2002 and 2005 was conducted. Several interviews were conducted with a number of key ARBCS staff during 2006 to identify why and how they reported IC information.

Findings

The findings indicate a greater focus on internal and external capital with less focus on human capital. The frequency with which certain internal, external and human capital elements occur in ARCBS reports can be explained by macro, meso and micro factors which affect the organisation and influence the information it provides to its stakeholders. It was found that the AR addressed the concerns of multiple stakeholder groups, whereas the ICR are more targeted towards specific audiences.

Originality/value

This paper examines ICR and IC frameworks in the context of the NFP sector. Few prior studies consider this sector.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

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