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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Roger Ottewill, Paul Riddy and Karen Fill

To illustrate the nature, range and variety of international networks linking individuals and institutions and reflecting the globalisation of higher education and desire of

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Abstract

Purpose

To illustrate the nature, range and variety of international networks linking individuals and institutions and reflecting the globalisation of higher education and desire of educators with common interests to shed their parochialism and communicate and collaborate on aspects of academic practice across national boundaries.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors draw on their personal experiences of securing European Union funding for establishing a network of tertiary level educators and some targeted online research, to inform their review and analysis.

Findings

Internationals networks in sphere of higher education can be either subject‐specific or thematic in their aims and either global or restricted to one part of the world in their membership. Some are the outcome of activities at grass roots level while others are a response to policy initiatives from inter‐governmental organisations.

Practical implications

Although widespread, international networks in higher education are by no means unproblematic and questions inevitably arise as to their contribution and role in facilitating innovations in academic practice. The authors identify a number of issues concerning their modus operandi and roles that need to be addressed if they are to play a full part in contributing to academic practice in higher education.

Originality/value

By highlighting the nature and contributions of international networks faculty are alerted to this mode of academic communication and collaboration and the steps that need to be taken if the full potential of such networks is be realised.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1965

This from a poet whose identity we have long since forgotten suggests the paramountcy of the present; to live to the full today's day and exact from it all the vitality and value…

Abstract

This from a poet whose identity we have long since forgotten suggests the paramountcy of the present; to live to the full today's day and exact from it all the vitality and value its few fleeting hours contain. There is profit to be had, however, at given times, such as events that are landmarks, at the ends of periods as now, the end of a year, from looking back and noting what has passed.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 67 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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