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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Patricia Nemetz and Wendy Eager

Marketing at ski resorts presents an interesting challenge because of the variety of resort types associated with the industry. At one end of the marketing spectrum are the…

Abstract

Marketing at ski resorts presents an interesting challenge because of the variety of resort types associated with the industry. At one end of the marketing spectrum are the so‐called destination resorts that trade on an image of glitz and glamour. Much of the marketing talent needed to run such resorts is to be found in large corporate departments that promote everything from upscale real estate to televised events studded with celebrities. At the other end of the spectrum are small local resorts, often owned by entrepreneurs, whose marketing activities are for the most part limited to finding the right marketing mix for the sport itself. In contrast to the myriad of activities associated with larger facilities, smaller resorts tend to focus more on product, price, promotion, and place. An interesting problem develops when smaller resorts seek to leapfrog their current market position by expanding their size. This case study examines the 49° North Mountain Resort, a small, privately owned skiing facility in Washington state that is seeking to expand. Before investing in expansion activities, entrepreneurs must carry out an accurate assessment of market potential and financial risk – by no means an easy task. One possible technique for ascertaining risk is to link a forecasted growth in revenues to improvements in facilities and operations. An entrepeneur with some prior access to a history of market behavior clearly has an advantage over those with only a limited sense of how a radically new product or service is likely to perform. The present study provides data that should prove useful to anyone attempting to judge whether an expansion is desirable. It also describes the marketing mix that has brought some stability to the resort’s financial performance. Market and quantitative data are available for analysis, but are other factors important as well? Should the resort maintain its current marketing mix, or should it target a more lucrative market?

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 December 2009

Teresa C. Smith and Patricia L. Nemetz

This paper sets out to describe several contemporary models of social entrepreneurship, along with the historical context of African nations typically receiving aid. It also seeks…

1296

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to describe several contemporary models of social entrepreneurship, along with the historical context of African nations typically receiving aid. It also seeks to critique three aid‐providing sectors – i.e. charity, government, and social entrepreneurship – with benefits and to explore the limits of each. It also aims to explore the perceptions of aid recipients in an East African village to determine their views of social entrepreneurship compared with other types of foreign aid.

Design/methodology/approach

Open‐ended interviews were conducted with village elders to establish an exploratory research foundation.

Findings

In general, village leaders were more favorable to social entrepreneurship efforts because they offered the possibility of self‐reliance and sustainability over time. Large government foreign aid largesse rarely reached villagers, so had little effectiveness in relieving their poverty.

Research limitations/implications

Several limitations are evident with the case study method used for the research. Future research is necessary to transfer the findings of the study to larger population segments, other organizations, and other national groupings. Expanded research methodologies, based on theoretical development and quantitative methods, will be required to further enhance the findings. Thus, the research is limited in both methodology and sampling population. The efficacy and limitations of various models of social entrepreneurship must also be tested for effectiveness, scope, scale, and sustainability. Comparative research would lend credibility to the findings.

Practical implications

The research findings suggest that villagers are generally more positive about local efforts compared with larger government projects, which rarely had a visible, significant impact on the villagers' lives. Leaders and villagers will continue partnerships that develop their businesses with the intention of providing for the social good of the community. Practical programs that develop marketing activities targeted to the specific goal of the business model would be an important step in furthering the goals of each model. For example, developing investment capital markets may require more advertising and promotion to raise awareness of their existence among potential donors. Additionally, local entrepreneurs involved in a social program may benefit from marketing education that enhances knowledge of customer needs and product development.

Originality/value

Because of the difficulties in establishing large research programs abroad, as well as in gaining the trust of local populations on a short‐term basis, the interviews represent a meaningful first step in understanding perceptions about social entrepreneurship and larger foreign aid programs.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Rachid Zeffane and Geoffrey Mayo

In recent years, organisations around the world have been seriously affected by a range of economic, political and social upheavals that have gathered momentum in most parts of…

180

Abstract

In recent years, organisations around the world have been seriously affected by a range of economic, political and social upheavals that have gathered momentum in most parts of the globe. The viability of the conventional (pyramidal) organisational structures is being challenged in conjunction with major shifts in the roles of mid and top managers. In many countries, the pace of the above socio‐economic events and uncertainties is happening at an unprecedented pace. Some markets are showing signs of potential gigantic expansions while others (historically prosperous) are on the verge of complete collapse (Dent, 1991). In responding to the socio‐economic challenges of the nineties, organisations (across the board) have resorted to dismantling the conventional pyramidal structure and adopting so‐called “leaner” structures (see Zeffane, 1992). The most common struggle has been to maintain market share in an economic environment increasingly characterised by excess labour supply (Bamber, 1990; Green & Macdonald, 1991). As organisations shifted their strategies from “mass production” to “post‐fordism” (see, for example Kern and Schumann, 1987), there has been a significant tendency to emphasise flexibility of both capital and labour in order to cater for the niche markets which are claimed to be rapidly emerging, world‐wide. This has resulted in massive organisational restructuring world‐wide.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 14 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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