Search results

1 – 10 of over 46000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Pieter A. van Brakel

Tertiary programmes for teaching online searching consist typically of the components of an online search system, different categories of databases, overview of database…

Abstract

Tertiary programmes for teaching online searching consist typically of the components of an online search system, different categories of databases, overview of database hosts and their search facilities, methods to create search strategies and command languages, to name but a few. Practical experience, an integral component, is gained by searching interactively on one or more database hosts, where the emphasis is on search techniques rather than the intrinsic characteristics of the databases of the specific system. The extent of students' hands‐on experience invariably depends on the teaching unit's budget, which may preclude extensive ‘live’ exposure. However, the technical facilities and shared resources of a local area network (LAN) are likely to have a significant effect on the traditional teaching methods of online searching. It is now possible, in a LAN environment, to integrate the various information retrieval activities, for example creating and searching personal or local databases, utilising these for indexing, abstracting and thesaurus building, searching locally on CDROM databases which simulate the search facilities and command languages of commercial database hosts and, when the need arises, accessing their external ‘online’ counterparts. This article will demonstrate how the limited concept of ‘online searching’ is broadened when a LAN and local databases are utilised in the online teaching process.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 11 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Moid A. Siddiqui

Studies the effect of eight CD indexes on online searching throughstatistical data of online searching conducted for the faculty, graduatestudents and researchers before…

Abstract

Studies the effect of eight CD indexes on online searching through statistical data of online searching conducted for the faculty, graduate students and researchers before and after acquisition of CD indexes. Findings indicate considerable decline in online searching use owing to CD indexes saving a large amount of money. Discusses the impact of CD indexes on staffing in the reference department.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Moid A. Siddiqui

Studies the effect of eight CD indexes on online searching throughstatistical data of online searching conducted for the faculty, graduatestudents and researchers before…

Abstract

Studies the effect of eight CD indexes on online searching through statistical data of online searching conducted for the faculty, graduate students and researchers before and after acquisition of CD indexes. Findings indicate considerable decline in online searching use due to CD indexes, saving a large amount of money. Discusses the impact of CD indexes on staffing in the reference department.

Details

Library Review, vol. 44 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Alex Byrne

Online searchers in Australia were studied via a mailed questionnaire examining six sets of variables: backgrounds, experience, attitudes, behaviours, styles and…

Abstract

Online searchers in Australia were studied via a mailed questionnaire examining six sets of variables: backgrounds, experience, attitudes, behaviours, styles and satisfaction. They appeared to support preplanning, online interaction and relevance checks. In similar vein, they were mildly cost conscious and believed that their requesters were most satisfied with their performance. Those with greater experience tended to fit this description belter, as did those in special libraries.

Details

Online Review, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-314X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Alan E. Bayer and Gerald Jahoda

Industrial and academic users of online bibliographic searching over a year's time did not generally diminish their amount of use of other traditional manual means of…

Abstract

Industrial and academic users of online bibliographic searching over a year's time did not generally diminish their amount of use of other traditional manual means of information gathering activities. However, in comparison to less frequent users and nonusers, frequent users increased their reliance on librarians. Online users increased their appraisal of the adequacy of information services available to them, particularly as regards those aspects generally considered the primary benefits of online searching. Users positively increased their assessment of the utility of online searches to their work, and online bibliographic searching capability was subsequently adopted as a permanent feature in both the industrial and academic work settings.

Details

Online Review, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-314X

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12024-615-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

EFTHIMIS N. EFTHIMIADIS

This review reports on the current state and the potential of tools and systems designed to aid online searching, referred to here as online searching aids. Intermediary…

Abstract

This review reports on the current state and the potential of tools and systems designed to aid online searching, referred to here as online searching aids. Intermediary mechanisms are examined in terms of the two stage model, i.e. end‐user, intermediary, ‘raw database’, and different forms of user — system interaction are discussed. The evolution of the terminology of online searching aids is presented with special emphasis on the expert/non‐expert division. Terms defined include gateways, front‐end systems, intermediary systems and post‐processing. The alternative configurations that such systems can have and the approaches to the design of the user interface are discussed. The review then analyses the functions of online searching aids, i.e. logon procedures, access to hosts, help features, search formulation, query reformulation, database selection, uploading, downloading and post‐processing. Costs are then briefly examined. The review concludes by looking at future trends following recent developments in computer science and elsewhere. Distributed expert based information systems (debis), the standard generalised mark‐up language (SGML), the client‐server model, object‐orientation and parallel processing are expected to influence, if they have not done so already, the design and implementation of future online searching aids.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 46 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Shih-Ping Jeng

The increasing number of people who search for and purchase gifts online underscores the need to better understand the process of searching for gifts online. This study…

Abstract

Purpose

The increasing number of people who search for and purchase gifts online underscores the need to better understand the process of searching for gifts online. This study explores online gift-searching with regard to the psychological characteristics of gift seekers and the benefits of searching. This study examines how gift-giving orientations (agape and reciprocity) influence the perceived benefits of searching (utilitarian and hedonic) in online gift-searching behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual framework was tested using a survey. The data were analysed using structural equation modelling.

Findings

The results show that agape positively influences both utilitarian and hedonic benefits, which in turn increase online gift-searching. Reciprocity does not affect utilitarian benefits but decreases hedonic benefits and thus causes a reduction in online gift-searching. The perceived benefit of searching fully mediates the relationship between gift-giving orientations and online gift-searching. Utilitarian benefits are the primary benefits that are sought by consumers who search for gifts online.

Originality/value

Previous research regarding online information searching has focused on searching for items for self-use. This study extends that research by focusing on gift giving. By analysing the mediating effects of both the utilitarian and hedonic benefits of searching, this study provides new insights into whether and how gift-giving orientations affect online gift-searching. Additionally this study offers guidelines for effectively managing online retail environments.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Anne B. Piternick

A checklist of functions and capabilities of online searching systems has been compiled, from experience, and from a study of some of the major vendor systems. The…

Abstract

A checklist of functions and capabilities of online searching systems has been compiled, from experience, and from a study of some of the major vendor systems. The checklist attempts to cover all system features, and is not restricted to the searching functions. It is offered as a tool for checking features of a new system which is being learned, as a framework for comparison of systems, and as a source of suggestions for functions and capabilities which might be incorporated into new and developing online systems such as OPACs. It could also serve as a ‘snapshot’, permitting a comparison of functions and capabilities currently available with those which may become available on future systems.

Details

Online Review, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-314X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

DAVID NICHOLAS

The study set out to determine: (1) what were the searching characteristics of end users in a non‐academic environment and explain this in the light of their information…

Abstract

The study set out to determine: (1) what were the searching characteristics of end users in a non‐academic environment and explain this in the light of their information needs; (2) whether these characteristics were those that were ascribed to end users in the professional literature; (3) whether they differed materially from those of information professionals working in the same fields. Searching characteristics were interpreted in their widest sense to include: command utilisation/knowledge; search success and satisfaction; volume of searching; searching style/ approach; duration of searches; file selection; willingness to delegate and levels of training. These issues were explored in relation to two practitioner groups — journalists from The Guardian newspaper, and politicians from The House of Commons. Comparative data were also sought from information professionals in these two organisations. A mixture of social and statistical methods was used to monitor end‐user and professional searching, though transactional log analysis was strongly featured. Altogether the searching behaviour of 170 end users was evaluated in the light of the searching behaviour of seventy librarians. The principal findings were that: in some respects end users did conform to the picture that information professionals have of them: they did search with a limited range of commands; more of their searches produced no results, and search statements were simply constructed. But in other respects they confounded their image — they could be very quick and economical searchers, and they did not display metres of print‐out. However, there were variations between individual end users, and it was often possible to find an end‐user group that matched an information professional group on one aspect of online searching or another. The online behaviour of end users was very much related to their general information seeking behaviour; and to the fact that they were not trained.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 52 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

1 – 10 of over 46000