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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Natalina Zlatevska and Mark T. Spence

The purpose of this paper is to test whether individuals possess personal consumption norms and idiosyncratic reference points to which they target behaviour. These personal…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test whether individuals possess personal consumption norms and idiosyncratic reference points to which they target behaviour. These personal consumption norms are related to the amount of food consumed independent of industry influences, specifically the size of the package offered and the perceived healthiness of the food. We also examine the extent to which one’s commitment to adhere to their personal consumption norm (referred to as “commitment to norm”) influences food consumption volume.

Design/methodology/approach

Three experiments are presented, two involve estimates of food consumption and the third examines actual food consumption.

Findings

All studies demonstrate that participants can provide a personal consumption norm for how much food they would typically consume that is independent of manipulated industry influences and that actual consumption is significantly related to their personal consumption norms. Furthermore, commitment to norm is negatively related to the absolute difference between their personal consumption norm and the amount of food consumed; however, supporting evidence was only realized in the case of actual food consumption, suggesting that commitment to norm does not have an effect on the formation of intentions.

Research limitations/implications

The authors demonstrate that at a point in time, personal norms are fixed. However, it is possible that norms may be shaped by industry influences over time. The authors suggest further research into how these personal norms evolve over time, as well as assessing how these norms affect the likelihood of going from zero consumption to some positive amount.

Practical implications

Many studies indicate that marketers can easily influence food consumption volume. However, their ability to influence actual consumption volume is circumscribed by factors beyond their control, namely idiosyncratic personal consumption norms.

Social implications

Over time, it is likely that personal consumption norms have emanated from a variety of antecedents, almost certainly including prior industry experience and situational/social influences. Repeated exposure to external influences is likely to shift the personal norm reference point over time.

Originality/value

Personal consumption norms are carefully disentangled from industry influences and are shown to significantly relate to food consumption volume, independent (but not to the exclusion) of industry influences.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 50 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Natalina Zlatevska

2837

Abstract

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 July 2010

Sudhir H. Kale, Robin D. Pentecost and Natalina Zlatevska

Joseph Pine and Jim Gilmore coined the term “experience economy” to describe a paradigm shift in consumption. To survive in this new economy, businesses must provide customers…

2610

Abstract

Purpose

Joseph Pine and Jim Gilmore coined the term “experience economy” to describe a paradigm shift in consumption. To survive in this new economy, businesses must provide customers with memorable consumption experiences. The purpose of this paper is to suggest eight ingredients that need to be incorporated into a compelling experience. Commercial experience providers, not‐for‐profit organizations, and political entities stand to benefit by integrating these elements in the experiences they provide to their targeted constituencies.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative phenomenological case study approach is employed using the 2008 Democratic National Convention as the referent for dissemination of a compelling experience.

Findings

Eight attributes were distilled that together constitute an unforgettable experience: planning, resourcing, targeting, anticipating, enabling, empathizing, framing, and engaging.

Practical implications

All experience providers desirous of creating compelling customer experiences for their targeted audiences would find it worthwhile to actively incorporate each of these elements in their product.

Originality/value

The paper uses a well‐planned and well‐executed political convention to uncover the building blocks of a compelling consumer experience.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 July 2010

Leo Jago and Jack Carlsen

347

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 December 2018

Teresa Davis, Margaret K. Hogg, David Marshall, Alan Petersen and Tanja Schneider

558

Abstract

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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