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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Moses Waithanji Ngware and Mwangi Ndirangu

To report study findings on teaching effectiveness and feedback mechanisms in Kenyan universities, which can guide management in developing a comprehensive quality control policy.

3624

Abstract

Purpose

To report study findings on teaching effectiveness and feedback mechanisms in Kenyan universities, which can guide management in developing a comprehensive quality control policy.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted an exploratory descriptive design. Three public and two private universities were randomly selected to participate in the study. A random sampling procedure was also used to select 79 respondents to participate in the research. A questionnaire administered in all participating universities was the main instrument for data collection.

Findings

There was no clear university policy on the evaluation of teaching effectiveness, despite its importance in quality control. Student evaluation of teaching effectiveness (SETE) was found to be unreliable, although widely used where evaluation existed, without other evaluation support systems. Feedback from the evaluation, though crucial in professional improvement, was not made available to the respondents.

Research limitations/implications

The study examined the evaluation of teaching effectiveness from the lecturers' perspectives. Further research may provide insights into the contribution of SETE to teaching effectiveness from the students' standpoint.

Practical implications

Use of a variety of evaluation tools (e.g. self, peer) rather than relying solely on SETE is necessary. Comprehensive and usable information may be provided for effective teaching. Universities should provide clear policy guidelines on quality control for faculties to develop multiple teaching effectiveness evaluation instruments.

Originality/value

Teaching evaluation is important in order to bring about an improvement in areas such as student achievement, and use of public funds or educational materials. The findings provide critical information for management decision making to assist universities to translate the resources at their disposal into learning outcomes.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 July 2011

Mwangi Ndirangu and Maurice O. Udoto

The purpose of this article is to report findings on the perceptions of quality of educational facilities in Kenyan public universities, and the implications for…

6797

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to report findings on the perceptions of quality of educational facilities in Kenyan public universities, and the implications for teaching/learning, and the learning environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted an exploratory descriptive design. A total of 332 and 107 undergraduate students and academic staff respectively from five public universities were randomly selected to participate in the study. The questionnaire was used for data collection.

Findings

The quality of the library, online resources and lecture facilities provided by Kenyan public universities did not meet quality measures of adequacy. They were unable to support the desired educational programmes effectively and facilitate the development of learning environments that support students and teachers in achieving their goals. The facilities were the antithesis of healthy and secure facilities that can provide a stimulating/inspirational setting for the users, critical measures of quality facilities.

Research limitations/implications

The study investigated the quality of learning resources from the perspectives of students and academic staff. Other stakeholders could have given additional perspectives not reported here.

Practical implications

Perceptions of quality of facilities indicated in this study show the need for university managers to focus on the improvement of the same if the quality of learning and learning environment were to be improved.

Social implications

Kenya's public universities can only develop the right calibre of manpower to meet the country's future needs by providing physical and other facilities that promote rigorous scholarship.

Originality/value

Improvement in quality of educational facilities is important for all interested in enhancing student learning and learning environment anywhere.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 July 2011

John Dalrymple

436

Abstract

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Article
Publication date: 25 February 2022

Swati Gupta, Shubham Gupta, Shifali Kataria and Sanjay Gupta

The purpose of this study is to recognise the role of information and communication technology (ICT) tools in different sectors like Education, Health Care, Business, FMCG and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to recognise the role of information and communication technology (ICT) tools in different sectors like Education, Health Care, Business, FMCG and Entertainment in the phase of social distancing. This study also attempts to provide a quantitative review of the scholarly literature on this topic.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive literature evaluation was undertaken using a database encompassing 150 English-language papers with publication dates ranging from 2019 to 2021. The research profile and thematic analysis are presented through a comprehensive content analysis, resulting in four themes. The study reviews various research articles and reports related to social distancing and opens a discussion on the growing importance of ICT tools during this COVID-19 era.

Findings

ICT acts as a surviving tool for the economy by creating a virtual environment and helping people to stay socially connected during this pandemic. There is a lack of empirical evidence to support the facts so further research is required.

Research limitations/implications

There are two drawbacks to the current study. Firstly, this study established a rigorous review methodology in which the researchers opted to exclude any grey literature, non-peer-reviewed articles, books, notes and book chapters from consideration. These sources could have had pertinent literature. Secondly, even after protocol’s rigour and numerous rounds of checks by a team of academicians and researchers, an anomaly may have sneaked into the evaluation.

Originality/value

The current study contributes to the growing literature on ICT tools particularly in this phase of social distancing. This paper highlights the need for future research in this area supported by different statistics.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 52 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Michael Afolabi

Identifies and describes the essential factors to be consideredwhen embarking on a manual newspaper or magazine indexing project inAfrica. Broadly groups factors as being…

Abstract

Identifies and describes the essential factors to be considered when embarking on a manual newspaper or magazine indexing project in Africa. Broadly groups factors as being technical and non‐technical. Technical factors include subject coverage, geographical coverage, number of newspapers and magazines to be indexed, completeness or selectivity of indexing, index language, indexing method, resources, physical format and the human element. Non‐technical factors are managerial/administrative support and publicity. Describes the procedure for newspaper and magazine indexing in Africa. Urges librarians and the print media to embark on newspaper and magazine indexing to ensure accessibility of their contents.

Details

New Library World, vol. 94 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 19 November 2020

Abstract

Details

The Impact of Global Drug Policy on Women: Shifting the Needle
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-885-0

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