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Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

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Article

Stefanie Mauksch, Pascal Dey, Mike Rowe and Simon Teasdale

As a critical and intimate form of inquiry, ethnography remains close to lived realities and equips scholars with a unique methodological angle on social phenomena. This…

Abstract

Purpose

As a critical and intimate form of inquiry, ethnography remains close to lived realities and equips scholars with a unique methodological angle on social phenomena. This paper aims to explore the potential gains from an increased use of ethnography in social enterprise studies.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors develop the argument through a set of dualistic themes, namely, the socio-economic dichotomy and the discourse/practice divide as predominant critical lenses through which social enterprise is currently examined, and suggest shifts from visible leaders to invisible collectives and from case study-based monologues to dialogic ethnography.

Findings

Ethnography sheds new light on at least four neglected aspects. Studying social enterprises ethnographically complicates simple reductions to socio-economic tensions, by enriching the set of differences through which practitioners make sense of their work-world. Ethnography provides a tool for unravelling how practitioners engage with discourse(s) of power, thus marking the concrete results of intervention (to some degree at least) as unplannable, and yet effective. Ethnographic examples signal the merits of moving beyond leaders towards more collective representations and in-depth accounts of (self-)development. Reflexive ethnographies demonstrate the heuristic value of accepting the self as an inevitable part of research and exemplify insights won through a thoroughly bodily and emotional commitment to sharing the life world of others.

Originality/value

The present volume collects original ethnographic research of social enterprises. The editorial develops the first consistent account of the merits of studying social enterprises ethnographically.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 13 no. 02
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

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Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

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Article

Mike Rowe, Elizabeth Turner and Geoff Pearson

The authors consider current policy debates in the UK about the professionalisation of the police to respond to changing patterns of crime and, specifically, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors consider current policy debates in the UK about the professionalisation of the police to respond to changing patterns of crime and, specifically, the suggestion that officers be educated to degree level. Drawing on the ethnographic evidence, the purpose of this paper is to focus attention on how officers learn, and continue to develop the applied, that is the craft aspects of the work of uniformed constables.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors draw on a long-term ethnographic project observing officers during the course of their duties. The focus is on the use of discretion and of particular powers. But in the course of the research, the authors also observe the way officers behave and the way they talk about their job.

Findings

The authors suggest that, while there may be a role for degree qualifications, attention needs to be paid to the practices the authors observe, practices that have long been the core craft skills of uniformed officers.

Originality/value

The authors suggest that, despite the emergence of cybercrime and other new forms of crime/threat, the evidence suggests that much has not. Not least, crime is not the only focus of police work.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

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Abstract

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Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

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Article

Mike Rowe

The purpose of this article is to critically consider the role of partnerships in regeneration. There has been a proliferation of partnerships at local, sub‐regional and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to critically consider the role of partnerships in regeneration. There has been a proliferation of partnerships at local, sub‐regional and regional levels, that has brought new people together around a shared agenda, and has sought to challenge and change the ways in which mainstream public services are delivered.

Design/methodology/approach

This article uses a qualitative approach drawing on previous research work and using narrative to construct a series of metaphors to provide greater levels of explanation and understanding of partnerships.

Findings

The current approach to partnership working arises principally from analysis of the weaknesses of fragmented services, it is also attractive to those who seek to open up the cosy, inefficient and, at times, corrupt worlds of local government. This is shown through an innovative typology of partnerships.

Research limitations/implications

While there are sound policy reasons for engaging in the game of partnerships, there are dangers in underestimating the capacity of public agencies to adopt and adapt the language of partnership, without genuinely engaging with the intent behind the policy.

Practical implications

The implications from this article have practical relevance for those working in public policy and for those involved in partnerships.

Originality/value

By drawing upon examples of the abuse of partnership arrangements, this article provides an original perspective on those phenomena that might be an indication of trouble.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 26 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

Content available

Abstract

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International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Abstract

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Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

Abstract

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Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

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