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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2024

Xiaolong Yuan, Feng Wang, Mianlin Deng and Wendian Shi

Based on conservation of resources (COR) theory, this study aims to examine the impact of daily illegitimate tasks on employees' daily silence and daily voice behavior, as well as…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on conservation of resources (COR) theory, this study aims to examine the impact of daily illegitimate tasks on employees' daily silence and daily voice behavior, as well as the mediating role of daily ego depletion and the moderating role of trait mindfulness.

Design/methodology/approach

Through daily diary approach, 81 employees were followed for 10 consecutive workdays. Multilevel analysis was employed to examine the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

The results showed that daily illegitimate tasks are positively related to daily silence behavior and negatively related to daily voice behavior; daily ego depletion plays a mediating role in these relationships. Trait mindfulness moderates the effect of daily illegitimate tasks on daily ego depletion and the indirect effect of daily illegitimate tasks on daily silence and daily voice.

Practical implications

Managers should be mindful of minimizing the assignment of illegitimate tasks. Additionally, it is recommended that the organization provide training courses for employees to help them reduce ego depletion. Finally, organizations should focus on fostering high levels of mindfulness among their employees.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the existing literature by investigating the immediate impact of illegitimate tasks on employee voice and silence at within-person level. By doing so, it enhances comprehension of the consequences associated with illegitimate tasks. Meanwhile, this study offers additional insights into the underlying mechanisms and boundary conditions of the effect of illegitimate tasks from a resource perspective.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 June 2022

Mianlin Deng, Xiujun Li, Feng Wang and Wendian Shi

Previous research has demonstrated that affirming an individual’s self-worth in intrinsic, stable aspects (e.g. personal attributes) enhances their pro-relationship tendencies, as…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has demonstrated that affirming an individual’s self-worth in intrinsic, stable aspects (e.g. personal attributes) enhances their pro-relationship tendencies, as compared to affirming extrinsic aspects of the individual (e.g. performance). This is especially so among people in certain dissatisfying relationships (e.g. romantic relationships). Extending this finding to organizational contexts, the purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of affirmation type (intrinsic vs extrinsic affirmations) on responses to workplace offenses among employees with high versus low job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Studies 1 (N = 224) and 2 (N = 358) examined the effects of intrinsic versus extrinsic affirmations on responses to hypothetical and real workplace offenses. Furthermore, to compare the effects of intrinsic and extrinsic affirmations to the baseline level, Study 3 (N = 441) added a control condition and examined the effects of affirmation type (intrinsic vs extrinsic vs control) on responses to workplace offenses.

Findings

For employees with low (but not high) job satisfaction, (1) intrinsic (vs extrinsic) affirmations promoted more prosocial responses (forgiveness and reconciliation) to workplace offenses; (2) although not as effective as intrinsic affirmations, extrinsic affirmations (vs baseline) also triggered prosocial intentions toward workplace offenses.

Originality/value

First, the study enriches the literature on workplace offenses by focusing on an individual-level factor – self-worth – that can be intervened (e.g. affirming one’s self-worth) by organizations and managers so as to promote prosocial responses to workplace offenses. Second, the study expands the scope of the self-affirmation theory in organizational contexts by examining the effectiveness of intrinsic and extrinsic affirmations in coping with workplace offenses. Third, practically speaking, the study provides a brief intervention (the writing task of describing an intrinsic or extrinsic affirmation experience) that can boost pro-relationships in the workplace.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 April 2014

Xiaohua Yang and Clyde D. Stoltenberg

This paper aims to re-examine the role of institutions in the rise of made-in-China multinationals. Specifically, the paper seeks to understand how changes in the global…

2108

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to re-examine the role of institutions in the rise of made-in-China multinationals. Specifically, the paper seeks to understand how changes in the global environment, especially global financial crisis, have solidified the Chinese government's role in pushing and encouraging Chinese firms to engage in outbound foreign direct investment (OFDI) activities.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper. The analysis is based on a large number of publicly available sources, including research papers, government documents, and reports. The paper strives to triangulate the validity of the data with multiple sources.

Findings

The study finds that while the role of the state in China has been evolving since the start of the economic reforms in 1978, by no means has it been lessened. Instead, the state has asserted its role specifically to grow Chinese multinationals in size and in number, by leveraging the financial resources accumulated over the last 30 years, by taking advantage of the cheap assets made available globally by the recent financial crisis and by institutionalizing its “Go Global” strategy.

Research limitations/implications

The study implies that the role of the state will be further solidified through China's national goal of enhancing competitiveness via knowledge acquisition through OFDI and simultaneously, multinationals’ OFDI initiatives and strategies will be reinforced by the state's economic policies and goals while their commercial interests will take on an increasing importance in the global marketplace and their behavior will co-evolve with and be reshaped by local, national, and international environments. The paper suggests that future studies employ co-evolutionary theory to investigate the role of state-owned enterprises (especially the functions of their CEOs) as well as non-state actors in shaping the institutional framework in China. Future studies should verify some of the ideas with empirical data and strive to triangulate different data sources to increase data quality.

Practical implications

The study also provides implications to Chinese policy makers on how to balance the government's role as conductor, enabler, protector, and constrainer while allowing Chinese multinationals to integrate into the global market for the benefit of both China and the world economy.

Originality/value

This study represents an original contribution to this topic. The research contributes to the study of globalization of Chinese enterprises by exploring the renewed dynamic relationship between the state and the firm after the 2008 global financial crisis.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Advances in Austrian Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-019-7

Article
Publication date: 17 April 2007

Li Xue Cunningham and Chris Rowley

The purpose of this article is to emphasise the development, importance and pressures on the under‐researched area of Chinese small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) and human…

8867

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to emphasise the development, importance and pressures on the under‐researched area of Chinese small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) and human resource management (HRM) and provide a review and research agenda, especially relating to the debate on convergence vis‐à‐vis divergence.

Design/methodology/approach

Recent research papers are discussed and possible convergence and the pressures on HRM and its practice in Chinese SMEs are examined. Key elements in Chinese HRM are highlighted. Four main dimensions of HRM are compared in terms of western and Chinese characteristics and their cultural impacts and problems. A conceptual framework to locate influences on Chinese HRM is outlined as well as a set of propositions for future research and examination of key HRM areas.

Findings

The continuing influences on HRM suggest that a distinctly Chinese HRM approach combining western practice with Chinese characteristics may be one way for SMEs to develop.

Originality/value

It is central to a better understanding of Chinese SMEs and helps fill some of the gap in the analysis of HRM in Chinese SMEs. It also offers insights which managers, policy makers and Chinese government can use to construct and reform the supporting system for SMEs.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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