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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2009

Gottfried Asamoah, Sabu Varughese, Salman Mushtaq, Linda Butterworth, Abu Abraham and Jason Luty

Tackling discrimination, stigma and inequalities in mental health is a major UK government objective. Surveys have suggested that mental health services are institutionally…

Abstract

Tackling discrimination, stigma and inequalities in mental health is a major UK government objective. Surveys have suggested that mental health services are institutionally racist. Most research has focused on stigma associated with schizophrenia despite well‐documented prejudice against people with other psychiatric disorders.The aim of this study was to assess stigmatised attitudes towards people from two ethnic groups with substance use disorder and learning disability. The 20‐point Attitude to Mental Illness Questionnaire (AMIQ) was used to assess stigmatised attitudes. A representative panel of members of the general public were randomised to receive a questionnaire with a picture of a European or African‐Caribbean man and a fictitious description of alcoholism (first round) or Down's syndrome (second round) six months later. Results were received for over 198 subjects (response rate 79‐84%). There was no difference between the score for the African‐Caribbean vignette or the European vignette for either alcoholism (mean AMIQ score 0.43 standard error = 0.39; n = 100 Vs 0.98 standard error = 0.53; n = 110; effect size r = 0.11; p = 0.2059;) or learning disability (mean 1.71 standard error = 0.22; n = 100 Vs 1.98; standard error = 0.30; n = 98; effect size r = 0.07; p = 0.2559).The study showed that ethnic origin had no significant difference on stigmatised attitudes towards someone with alcoholism or learning disability. Although a larger study would have increased power to detect a statistically significant difference it seems unlikely that a difference of the observed magnitude would be of any practical relevance.

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Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

Arghya Sarkhel, Linda Butterworth, Sabu Varughese, Harish Rao and Jason Luty

To establish the how far the leading psychiatric journals from the USA and UK show any favouritism to researchers from the journals' host countries. Retrospective review of…

118

Abstract

To establish the how far the leading psychiatric journals from the USA and UK show any favouritism to researchers from the journals' host countries. Retrospective review of original data‐based research reports published in 2006 from the five highest impact general psychiatric journals.British authors were 10 times more likely to appear as authors in two general psychiatry journals that are UK based than the three USA based journals (odds ratio=10.37 CI=8.95 to 12.02). American authors were 13 times more likely to publish in three leading three American psychiatry journals compared to British journals (odds ratio=14.27 CI=12.39 to 16.45). It is difficult to explain why researchers appear so much more likely to appear as authors in the host countries' journals other than by invoking some form of bias or favouritism in journals' editorial procedures. This creates a particular disadvantage for research outside the USA and UK.Research is funded and disseminated based on publications in high impact medical journals. If medical journals are xenophobic, that is they preferentially publish articles from their host countries, this severely disadvantages research in less developed countries, of which, many host no medical journals. For example simple, inexpensive research, such as the provision of non‐proprietary antidepressants and antipsychotics or measures to prevent the epidemic of alcohol and tobacco related problems in developed countries may be hugely beneficial to millions of people, but this is unlikely to be researched or disseminated if medical journals are xenophobic.

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Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 March 2011

Linda Holbeche

1236

Abstract

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Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2012

Linda Holbeche

3305

Abstract

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Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Book part
Publication date: 9 October 2019

Linda Chisholm

Abstract

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Teacher Preparation in South Africa
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-694-7

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2002

Linda Ward

179

Abstract

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Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1975

Alfred Hodina

1. Conway, H. McKinley and Linda R. Liston, eds. The Weather Handbook. Atlanta, Conway Research Inc., 1974. 255p. This Handbook pulls together weather information for over 250…

Abstract

1. Conway, H. McKinley and Linda R. Liston, eds. The Weather Handbook. Atlanta, Conway Research Inc., 1974. 255p. This Handbook pulls together weather information for over 250 U.S. cities and for about 325 cities in other countries. A revision of the 1963 edition, it contains new data for most of the reporting stations and includes data for a number of new stations not included in the earlier edition. The first edition and this revision is a result of the editor's continuing interest in flying and his need for weather data for flight planning. This work as, Mr. Conway states, attempts to put this information in a form that is more convenient, practical and easier to use.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

C.N. LINDA FAN, M.H. CHRISTABEL HO and VINCENT NG

This paper proposes conducting extensive cross‐profession comparison regarding perceptions of various professionals towards professional ethics as the first step in professional…

Abstract

This paper proposes conducting extensive cross‐profession comparison regarding perceptions of various professionals towards professional ethics as the first step in professional ethics inquiry. The authors argue that concepts and perceptions of professional ethics result from the prolonged professional socialization process during both college/university and industry training. Differences in professional ethics conceptions both within and between professions can be ascribed to differences in training. For college/university training these differences may lie in varying professional course contents and arrangements, diverse educational professional development (CPD) courses offered by various professional institutions, codes of conduct drafted by professional institutions and corporations, personal work experience may account for these differences. However, this pluralist explanation of these differences is not the end of the inquiry, but rather explicitly points to the difficulty of resolving the conceptual array in professional ethics inquiry.

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Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

Thomas W. Conkling and Linda R. Musser

Scientific findings have been announced in technical reports since the early 1900s and, over the years, these reports have become important information resources in many areas of…

Abstract

Scientific findings have been announced in technical reports since the early 1900s and, over the years, these reports have become important information resources in many areas of engineering and science. Issued in modest numbers until the 1940s, increased government spending on military and scientific research caused a boom in the production of technical reports. This situation has continued to the present, with approximately 100,000 reports being published annually, representing research activity in the tens of billions of dollars.

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Collection Building, vol. 10 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Abstract

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Teacher Preparation in South Africa
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-694-7

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