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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Bonnie McBain, Antony Drew, Carole James, Liam Phelan, Keith M Harris and Jennifer Archer

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the experiences of tertiary students learning oral presentation skills in a range of online and blended learning contexts across…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the experiences of tertiary students learning oral presentation skills in a range of online and blended learning contexts across diverse disciplines.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was designed as a “federation” of trials of diverse online oral communications assessment tasks (OOCATs). Tasks were set in ten courses offered across all five faculties at University of Newcastle, Australia. The authors collected and analysed data about students’ experiences of tasks they completed through an anonymous online survey.

Findings

Students’ engagement with the task was extremely positive but also highly varied. This diversity of student experience can inform teaching, and in doing so, can support student equity. By understanding what students think hinders or facilitates their learning, and which students have these experiences, instructors are able to make adjustments to their teaching which address both real and perceived issues. Student experience in this study highlighted five very clear themes in relation to the student experience of undertaking online oral communications tasks which all benefit from nuanced responses by the instructor: relevance; capacity; technology; time; and support.

Practical implications

Using well-designed OOCATs that diverge from more traditional written assessments can help students successfully engage with course content and develop oral communication skills. The student experience can be used to inform teaching by catering for different student learning styles and experience. Student centred approaches such as this allows instructors to reflect upon the assumptions they hold about their students and how they learn. This understanding can help inform adjustments to teaching approaches to support improved student experience of learning oral communications tasks.

Originality/value

The importance of learning oral communication skills in tertiary education is widely acknowledged internationally, however, there is limited research on how to teach these skills online in a way that is student centred. This research makes a contribution toward addressing that gap.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 58 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2010

Criona M. Walshe, Kevin S. Boner, Jane Bourke, Rosemary Hone, Maureen Lynch, Liam Delaney and Dermot Phelan

Catheter related blood stream infection (CRBSI) remains an important complication of central venous catheters(CVCs). Educational programmes have been associated with CRBSI…

Abstract

Purpose

Catheter related blood stream infection (CRBSI) remains an important complication of central venous catheters(CVCs). Educational programmes have been associated with CRBSI reduction but evidence in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) patients is limited, despite an increased risk of CRBSI. The effect of educational processes were evaluated and the value of different methods of expression of CRBSI incidence were assessed.

Design/methodology/approach

Study was performed in a 525‐bed tertiary university hospital over 12 years. A multidisciplinary TPN committee was created to examine CRBSI episodes and a parallel education programme was set up and maintained. Prospectively collected data were analysed from 1,392 patients in whom 2,565 CVCs were used over 15,397 CVC days. CRBSI incidence was expressed as CRBSI episodes per 1,000 CVC days, percentage patients or percentage CVCs infected.

Findings

CRBSI incidence fell from 33 to 7 episodes per 1,000 CVC days (p<0.01). Percentage of infected CVCs fell from 17 per cent to 5 per cent(p <0.05) and proportion of patients affected fell from 27 per cent to 7 per cent(p <0.01). The corresponding slopes of the lines expressing fall in CRBSI rate were −1.3‐0.63 and −1.4 respectively.

Research limitations/implications

A sustained educational programme was associated with a significant fall in CRBSI in TPN patients. An incidence of 5‐7 episodes per 1,000 CVC days, a figure comparable with non‐TPN CVCs, was achievable.

Practical implications

Each method of expression of CRBSI incidence proved valid in this setting and contributed to the educational programme.

Originality/value

The value of this study is that it demonstrates how implementing and sustaining an education programme can achieve reduced rates of infection. No published study utilising all methods of expressing CRBSI incidence could be found.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2008

Liam Concannon

Central to the notion of citizenship is equality, social inclusion and social justice, yet heterosexual constructions of citizenship continue to privilege. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Central to the notion of citizenship is equality, social inclusion and social justice, yet heterosexual constructions of citizenship continue to privilege. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between citizenship, social policy and sexual identity, comparing experiences found in the UK and the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines the concepts of nation, identity and belonging, taking account of normative discourses and structures such as the family, to illustrate how social policy creates second‐class status for lesbians, gay men, bisexuals and transgendered people (LGBT).

Findings

The paper finds that within the relationship between the state and LGBT citizens, there is institutional hostility towards LGBT people, and explores the ways in which policy makers characterise difference as abnormal, inferior, of less worth and importantly, problematic.

Originality/value

The paper is of value in discussing Queer theory and in seeking to challenge and transform the social exclusion of LGBT citizens, by contributing to the rise in new forms of citizenship. The paper takes account of evolving models of citizenship that seek to redress current inadequate mainstream structures.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 28 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Warren Smith

This article notes the growing attractiveness of concepts “borrowed” from chaos theory in organizational studies. Many of these interpretations display sentiments broadly…

Abstract

This article notes the growing attractiveness of concepts “borrowed” from chaos theory in organizational studies. Many of these interpretations display sentiments broadly congruent with a “postmodern” approach to organization. Indeed chaos theory itself is presented as part of a similar postmodern shift within natural science. However, these sentiments have been subject to stinging criticism by scientists. Here, the deterministic underpinning of chaos theory is used to show that chaos theory is an entirely modernist enterprise. In this case the indeterministic messages taken by organizational theorists are something of a misunderstanding. Consequently, I discuss whether this is enough to threaten the interdisciplinary status of chaos theory, particularly when it is used in a self-consciously ‘metaphorical’ fashion.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 4 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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