Search results

1 – 10 of 670
To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Subject area

Entrepreneurship.

Study level/applicability

This case is designed for teaching entrepreneurship at master’s level. Depending on students’ interests and exposure levels however, it can be applied to teaching undergraduate entrepreneurship courses that are taken after at least the two basic entrepreneurship courses.

Case overview

Nigeria’s tomato industry is one of the most dysfunctional in the entire nation’s economy. Although the country is West Africa’s largest tomato producer, nearly half of the produced tomatoes rot on the way to the market, which makes Nigeria heavily reliant on imported tomato paste. Amidst growing concerns among stakeholders of the need to address the dysfunction of the tomato industry, Tomato Jos emerged as the earliest social impact venture in the tomato paste industry. Nigeria’s changing macro-economic conditions clearly call for a tomato processing industry and the entry of Tomato Jos is well timed. Within a span of two years, the company successfully raised $600,000 in equity, debt and grant financing that has catered for start-up expenses and expansion to 150 hectares of farmland. The company plans on raising an additional $25m to cater for their planned Stage III growth. Amidst growing excitement over the entry of Tomato Jos in the industry with a social enterprise, Africa’s top business tycoon, Aliko Dangote, announced entry into the tomato processing industry with a major tomato processing facility in the same region as Tomato Jos. The Dangote Group of companies is seen as very tough competition to contend with, due to their sheer size, political leverage and financial capital. This case study primarily teaches how multiple aspects of start-up entrepreneurship may be handled rather than being taught separately as is often the case in mainstream business education. Entrepreneurs in the field rarely confront real challenges in this way. This case study introduces a practice of teaching a collection of key aspects of entrepreneurship, their nuances and inter-relationships in an integrated fashion.

Expected learning outcomes

The overarching objective of this case is to teach students how to interpret the shifts in industry position resulting from the entry of an important competitor within the larger context of growing a social venture. At the end of the case study analysis, students will be able to analyze the effects of changing forces and conditions in a country’s business environment on a start-up social enterprise; interpret the shifts in a venture’s industry position after the entry of an important competitor; identify appropriate funding sources and financing strategies to fuel the growth of a social enterprise; identify areas of a start-up’s business model that need improvement and/or iteration to support faster growth; and develop an effectuation-based strategy for a growing venture.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Samuel Danjuma Wapwera, C. O. Egbu, A. G. Parsa and G. M. Ayanbinpe

– This paper aims to assess the Jos Plateau Tin-mining region as an abandoned mine area being used for housing development with a view to make recommendations.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess the Jos Plateau Tin-mining region as an abandoned mine area being used for housing development with a view to make recommendations.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilising secondary data, which maps out ten different locations in the region, this paper highlights the level of radioactive substances (X-ray, beta and gamma rays) and the presence of heavy metals in the environment, abandoned mines, home for the people as well as housing development within a derelict region. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with heads of selected settlement within the Jos Plateau Tin-mining region.

Findings

Subsequent analysis shows that the radioactive substances exceed the international standards and therefore have a serious impact on the health of the local population who reside in the affected area. This is particularly significant as people use the contaminated soil as a basic material for their homes as well as farming and food production.

Research limitations/implications

With overpopulation of neighbouring city and rising house prices, an increasing number of people have moved to the Tin-mining areas often without any knowledge about the perils of contaminated soil. At the same time, the planning authority has no presence in the affected area, as it falls outside its jurisdiction.

Practical implications

However, there is an urgent need to address this problem and prevent people from moving to this area, otherwise this would become a serious long-term human catastrophe.

Social implications

Drawing from international experience, the paper argues that it is possible to develop housing in former Tin-mining areas but require careful remediation and engagement by the public and private sector.

Originality/value

The discussion in this paper makes a case for appropriate physical planning measure as people build their homes on the abandoned Tin-mining areas, with the presences of heavy metals and radioactive substances which are dangerous to human health where the governments have not made provision to address the problem. It is a bridge linking a previous paper on the environment and now consideration on housing/home which together form part of an ongoing PhD research “A potential application of spatial planning in Jos, Nigeria”.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Vicki Lawal and Stephen Akintunde

The purpose of this paper is to examine the potential role of information literacy (IL) within the changing context of the e-learning environment at the University of Jos

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the potential role of information literacy (IL) within the changing context of the e-learning environment at the University of Jos in recent years. It focuses and emphasises the role of the University library in facilitating teaching and learning through the use of e-learning platforms in teaching information retrieval skills. The paper aims to identify gaps in students’ information skills that could be addressed through IL instruction.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed a case study research design while the methodology involved the administration of structured questionnaires to the two groups of respondents.

Findings

Findings from the study provide useful insights to the skills challenges experienced by students and point to a need for effective collaboration between the library, faculty and management in order to promote a better approach to learning at the institution.

Originality/value

By emphasising the role of the library, the paper contributes to previous studies on e-learning at the University and provides a basis for further research in this regard.

Details

Library Management, vol. 35 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

S.D. Wapwera, Ali Parsa and Charles Egbu

The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyse the methods of housing finance adopted by the low income and informal groups in Nigeria.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyse the methods of housing finance adopted by the low income and informal groups in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 300 households in selected areas (low‐income/informal) of Jos Metropolis, Nigeria, was carried out, concerning the methods of housing finance used for building and home improvement.

Findings

The survey showed that 75 per cent of the households utilized traditional methods of financing and 25 per cent using modern methods.

Research limitations/implications

Based on data collected from the survey, the research serves as a basis for further research into traditional methods of housing finance in developing countries.

Practical implications

The analysis of traditional financing methods highlights the range and structure of the traditional methods of financing in operation in informal and low income areas of Jos Metropolis, Nigeria. For example, informal and customary/traditional methods (Esusu/Asusu, Age grade association, Men's Revolving Loan Association, Social club contribution among others), of financing appear to be very effective housing finance methods.

Social implications

The paper shows that In the absence of formal institutional financing methods, strengthening the community‐based social network through formalisation and empowerment for housing finance becomes vital.

Originality/value

It is argued that it is possible to utilise and formalise these traditional methods of housing finance, in order to enhance access to finance for housing development in low‐income urban areas in developing countries.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Reuel Johnmark Dakung and Tsenba Wummen Soemunti

The purpose of this paper is to develop an entrepreneurial behaviour model of both quantitative and qualitative factors that are relevant in influencing the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an entrepreneurial behaviour model of both quantitative and qualitative factors that are relevant in influencing the entrepreneurial behaviour (self-employment) of catholic Christians in Plateau State-Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

The study followed a cross sectional (one shot) design. Also, a descriptive survey with a mixed methods and triangulation focus constitutes the study’s research design. A methodological paradigm triangulation concurrently was carried out where both qualitative and quantitative approaches to data collection was employed. Valid research instruments (questionnaire and interview) were utilised to conduct the survey on 302 catholic Christians. Frequency distribution and Structural Equation Model (SEM) through the aid of IBM SPSS AMOS software version 22 were used to analyse and test the hypotheses formulated.

Findings

It was established that catholicpreneurship (innovation) has a strong and positive relationship with entrepreneurial behaviour. The catholicpreneurship (innovation) factor accounts for an estimate of r=0.327, **p<0.01; significant at 0.000 in our model.

Research limitations/implications

The study is only restricted to Jos and Bukuru areas of Plateau State – Nigeria. Further research could be conducted to cover all the seventeen (17) LGAs of the state. Furthermore, the study employed the cross-sectional approach. A longitudinal approach should be employed to study the trend over a period of at least two years. Finally, the four (4) factors identified in influencing/triggering entrepreneurship behaviour may not be sufficient enough in explaining the phenomenon. Hence, there are other factors that may contribute in influencing entrepreneurship behaviour of the catholic Christians that were not part of this study.

Practical implications

This study indicates a number of implications for the church and policy makers. Since entrepreneurship is crucial to economic growth and self-employment, it is pertinent for the church to intensify initiatives in encouraging the spirit of Catholicpreneurship (innovation) among Christians in Plateau State and Nigeria at large. Hence, the church should promote entrepreneurship (sponsor training/classes for its members. With diverse programmes offered by the government to encourage entrepreneurship, the church has a wide range of opportunities to cash on when trying to set up ventures.

Originality/value

This paper is the first in Nigeria (Africa) to test empirically the relationships between catholicpreneurship (innovation), attitude, perceived behavioural control, intention and entrepreneurship behaviour among catholic Christians.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Onome Daniel Awaritefe

The study examines the spatial pattern of 101 destinations considered important in Nigeria by tourists, and categorised them into various grades, employing a questionnaire…

Abstract

The study examines the spatial pattern of 101 destinations considered important in Nigeria by tourists, and categorised them into various grades, employing a questionnaire survey of 634 tourists randomly selected from seven centres in Nigeria. A standard stanine rating scheme was used to evaluate the value of the 101 destinations in Nigeria for attracting tourists. The study revealed eight tourism regions in Nigeria, with two regions, Lagos and Yankari/Jos/Abuja emerging as primary attractive tourism regions, and four regions, the Western, Northeastern, Edo/Delta and North Central tourism regions emerging as secondary tourism regions. Destinations considered most important were mostly short distance or nearby, and associated with both cultural and natural resources, especially wildlife/games and beaches/water areas. The study concludes with implications for destination planning, development and marketing.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 62 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Benard Alkali Soepding, John C. Munene and Dagwom Yohanna Dang

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the financial well-being of often-neglected group in the society. The authors examined the role of risk management and social…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the financial well-being of often-neglected group in the society. The authors examined the role of risk management and social capital in the financial well-being of the retirees in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative method of research is used with a six-point Likert scale questionnaire. A survey was conducted to 376 retirees from public organizations to determine the perception of their financial well-being in post-retirement era. The sample population is selected using the simple random sampling technique. An exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling are used to analyze the data.

Findings

The results indicate that both risk management and social capital are significant predictors of retirees’ financial well-being in the Nigeria context. All respondents have a good education background.

Research limitations/implications

This study focused on retirees who have worked in public organizations in Nigeria. Thus, it is likely that the results may not be generalized to other settings. The results show that to promote financial well-being among retirees, the focus should be put mainly on individual risk management and maintaining good social capital.

Originality/value

The present study is first of its kind that focuses on contributory role of risk management and social capital in influencing the financial well-being of retirees in Nigeria. Findings make a novel contribution to retirees’ financial well-being literature by clarifying the significant role played by risk management and social capital in promoting the financial well-being of retirees in a developing country, specifically in Nigeria.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Benard Alkali Soepding, John C. Munene and Laura Orobia

Little is known about how self-determination and financial attitude are linked to retirees’ financial well-being in Nigerian context. Drawing from the theory of reasoned…

Abstract

Purpose

Little is known about how self-determination and financial attitude are linked to retirees’ financial well-being in Nigerian context. Drawing from the theory of reasoned action, the purpose of this paper is to examine the connection of self-determination, financial attitude and financial well-being. Also, this paper examines the mediating role of financial attitude between self-determination and financial well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional study was used in collecting quantitative data from 399 retirees drawn from North Central Nigeria. Hypotheses are tested through structural equation modelling using the Analysis of Moments of Structures (AMOS) software, version 23.

Findings

Results from the research indicate that financial attitude serves as a trajectory through which self-determination leads to financial well-being. Therefore, self-determination and financial attitude significantly contribute to the financial well-being of retirees.

Research limitations/implications

The use of a cross-sectional design may undermine the causal conclusions of the findings. This study adds to existing research on financial well-being by showing that financial attitude is significant in attaining financial well-being and how self-determination variable impact financial well-being.

Originality/value

This study contributes to literature by establishing the mediating role of financial attitude in the relationship between self-determination and financial well-being. Thus, instead of concentrating on only the direct effects of self-determination and financial well-being, the indirect effect of financial attitude is tested.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Lorena Deleanu, Constantin Georgescu, Sorin Ciortan and Liviu Catalin Solea

The purpose of this paper is to establish the influence of oil concentration in oil-in-water emulsions on their flammability on hot surfaces and on their viscosity. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish the influence of oil concentration in oil-in-water emulsions on their flammability on hot surfaces and on their viscosity. The interest in fire test systematization is obviously developing due to many grades and applications of fluids and new design solutions asking for higher parameters in exploitation, including pressure and temperature. Higher temperature and pressure have a synergic effect on fire risk; thus, a special attention has to be given to selecting fluids based on fire tests.

Design/methodology/approach

This test simulates a hazardous event when a fluid drops on a hot surface: 10 ml of fluid is dropped during 40-60 seconds on a manifold kept at a constant temperature, from a distance of 300 ± 5 mm above the surface. Tests were done under the procedure of SR EN ISO 20823:2004, with an original equipment. The apparent viscosity of the tested fluids was determined using a rheometer Rheotest 2. The tests were done for the fully mineral oil (Prista MHE-40) and for emulsions with different oil volume in water: 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80 and 90 per cent, respectively.

Findings

The mineral oil MHE 40 Prista does not burn repeatedly for manifold temperature lower than 440°C, but it burns at 450°C on the clean surface and at 425°C on dirty surface, as obtained after testing the same oil, but at a temperature for which the oil burns. The emulsions do not burn even at 90 per cent oil in water, but the apparent viscosity of the emulsion is too high and unstable, above 20-30 per cent (volume) oil in water. No evident relationship was found between the apparent viscosity of the emulsions and their behavior on hot surface.

Research limitations/implications

The hydraulic fluids were ranked, taking into account the flammability characteristics determined with the help of this test.

Practical implications

This paper aims to reduce the risk of fire in hazardous environments using fire-resistant fluids.

Social implications

Testing hydraulic fluids under the procedure of SR EN ISO 20823:2004 is required by European and national regulations to avoid large-scale accidents produced by the ignition of hydraulic fluids.

Originality/value

As far as the authors have known, the test procedure was only used for establishing whether a certain fluid passes or does not pass this test. The authors did not find any references for establishing the influence of oil concentration on the flammability characteristics. Also, the equipment has an original design, allowing for a good repeatability and a high protection of the operator.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 67 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Ryan Patten

Numerous research studies have analyzed the difficulties of implementing community‐oriented policing (COP) in policing agencies, but there is no research examining this…

Abstract

Purpose

Numerous research studies have analyzed the difficulties of implementing community‐oriented policing (COP) in policing agencies, but there is no research examining this phenomenon in a natural resource law enforcement department. This paper aims to examine Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife law enforcement officers' attitudes and opinions regarding their agency's paradigm shift toward COP to gain compliance with resource‐protective regulations.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are collected through the use of 43 semi‐structured interviews and ten ride‐alongs to determine the officers' commitment to use of COP in resolving contentious natural resource disputes.

Findings

This paper reaffirms findings of other COP studies regarding the need to have clear communication about officers' roles under COP and the necessity for the department to reformulate its evaluations of officer production and progress.

Practical implications

Other regulatory agencies can apply the lessons learned from this research, which demonstrate that capitalizing on veteran officers' positive experiences and rewarding officers engaged with COP are important steps to consider when attempting an agency shift from feared “regulator” to a trustworthy “collaborative problem solver”. Based on the conclusions of this research, policing and other regulatory administrators should not assume that their veteran officers are unwilling to accept a change in their roles and duties, and seasoned employees can also be determined leaders when training new recruits.

Originality/value

In a stark contradiction to other COP research, the paper reveals that veteran officers are significantly more likely to accept and utilize COP approaches as opposed to their younger counterparts.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 670