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Publication date: 6 May 2003

Gail Bader is Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana. A cultural anthropologist, Bader’s research interests include…

Abstract

Gail Bader is Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana. A cultural anthropologist, Bader’s research interests include educational anthropology, the cultural construction of work, computing and technology, and U.S. and Japanese culture.John M. Budd is Professor and Associate Director of the School of Information Science and Learning Technologies at the University of Missouri – Columbia. He is the author of numerous journal articles and books, including The Academic Library and Knowledge and Knowing in Library and Information Science.Bambi Burgard has served as Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs/Student Achievement at the Kansas City Art Institute since May 2002. Upon completion of her undergraduate education, she began doctoral study in counseling psychology at the University of Missouri-Kansas City where she earned her Ph.D. in 1999. She completed her predoctoral and postdoctoral internships at the University of Missouri-Kansas City counseling center.Harvey R. Gover is on the library faculty of Washington State University (WSU) Libraries and is the Assistant Campus Librarian for WSU Tri-Cities. Formerly, he was Public Services Librarian, Tarleton State University, a branch campus of Texas A&M. He was a principal author of the 2000 edition of ACRL Guidelines for Distance Learning Library Services.William Graves III is Associate Professor of Humanities at Bryant College in Smithfield, Rhode Island. A linguistic anthropologist, Graves is interested in the diverse roles that language and communication play in social and cultural change. He has conducted fieldwork on issues of social and cultural change among Native Americans, in diverse organizational settings in the U.S., in enterprises undergoing privatization in Russia and, most recently, among small-scale entrepreneurs in Belarus.José-Marie Griffiths served as the Chief Information Officer at the University of Michigan and Vice Chancellor for Information Infrastructure at the University of Tennessee. She was responsible for strategic IT planning; the development and implementation of academic and administrative computing, telecommunications and networking activities; and IT alliances with external organizations. She is the recipient of numerous awards for her contributions to information science, the development of the IT industry, and support for women in computing. She currently holds an endowed chair and professorship in the School of Information Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh and is Director of the University’s Sara Fine Institute for Interpersonal Behavior and Technology.John B. Harer has been a school and academic librarian for over twenty-seven years. As an academic librarian, he has held various positions in access services, reference, and personnel administration. He is currently the Director of the Library at Catawba College in Salisbury, NC.Donna Meyer’s career has included management of computer labs, teaching computer skills, designing curricula that integrated information skills into core subject areas, creating web sites, and managing library collections. She currently works as Director of Library Resources at Northcentral University in Prescott, Arizona, providing quality online graduate research services.Rush Miller has been Hillman University Librarian and Director of the University Library system at the University of Pittsburgh for eight years. He serves as co-chair for the Association of Research Libraries e-Metrics Project. Miller is active in the profession and writes regularly on library management, international librarianship, diversity, digital library content and e-Metrics.James M. Nyce, a cultural anthropologist, is interested in how information technologies are used in and can change workplaces and organizations, particularly in medicine and higher education. A docent at Linköping University, Nyce’s research interests include the historical, social aspects of library and information science, the design and evaluation of information systems, and information use in science and medicine. Nyce is Associate Professor at the School of Library and Information Management, Emporia State University, Emporia, Kansas, and Visiting Associate Professor at the Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis.Charles Oppenheim is Professor of Information Science at Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK. His main professional interest is where the law interacts with information services. He is also interested in knowledge management, measuring the value and impact of information, citation studies, bibliometrics, national and company information policy, the electronic information and publishing industries, ethical issues, chemical information handling, patents information and policy issues related to digital libraries and the Internet.Roswitha Poll is chief librarian of the University and Regional Library Münster. From 1991 to 1993 chair of the German Association of Academic Librarians, since 1997 chair of the German Standards Committee for Information and Documentation. She chaired the IFLA group for the handbook on performance measurement in libraries and is now convener of the ISO working group for the International Standard of Library Statistics and member of the ISO group for performance measurement. She is working in national and international groups on collection preservation, quality management, statistics and cost analysis in libraries.Mary Jane Rootes is a Public Services librarian at Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College in Tifton, Georgia. She worked previously at the Pitts Library of Andrew College in Cuthbert, Georgia.Sherrie Schmidt is the Dean of University Libraries at Arizona State University. She began her tenure at ASU as Associate Dean of Library Services in 1990 and was named Dean in 1991. Prior to that, she worked at Texas A&M University, the University of Texas at Austin, the FAXON Company, the University of Texas at Dallas, AMIGOS, the University of Florida, and Ohio State University. Most of her professional activities relate to the use of technology in libraries.Joan Stenson is a Research Associate in the Department of Information Science at Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK, where she is currently undertaking a doctorate.Richard Wilson is Professor of Business Administration and Financial Management at Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK. He has inter-disciplinary interests in the valuation of information assets. His publications reflect his research interests in management control, financial control, marketing control and strategic control.

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Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-206-1

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2008

John B. Harer

The purpose of this paper is to investigate current practices in employee satisfaction assessment to determine if quality in the production of library services and work…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate current practices in employee satisfaction assessment to determine if quality in the production of library services and work systems are being assessed from the employees' perspective. It is grounded in the theoretical perspective that customers judge quality and that employees are internal customers, equally important to assessment efforts as are external customers. The paper argues that employees provide a unique perspective to the assessment of quality that external customers cannot provide and that quality assessment needs to be an additional form of employee assessment from that of employee satisfaction or organizational climate initiatives.

Design/methodology/approach

A content analysis of measures in organizational climate surveys gathered from the Association of Research Libraries was performed. Each item of several organizational climate surveys was analyzed for words and phrases identified as associated with quality assessment. Conclusions were made based on this analysis.

Findings

Each of the organizational climate surveys examined included some measures of quality, though there was no consistent focus on quality. Quality issues in these surveys included sharing skills, work load issues, and alignment with library vision and mission.

Research limitations/implications

This is the first part of an ongoing research project. The next steps include content analysis of employee satisfaction instruments and a Delphi study of quality measures gleaned from this analysis.

Originality/value

The paper contends that quality assessment is different than employee satisfaction assessment, but significantly enhances employee assessment in general – providing benefits to both the library and its employees.

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New Library World, vol. 109 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

John B. Harer

The purpose of this paper is to describe how small, academic libraries may realize significant benefits from employing LibQual+TM as an assessment of customer needs and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe how small, academic libraries may realize significant benefits from employing LibQual+TM as an assessment of customer needs and expectations, stressing that these benefits may vary by the actual size of the institution.

Design/methodology/approach

Catawba College compared its experience utilizing LibQual+TM with that of Washburn University, reported by Dole as a small, academic library application of the survey. Catawba College is a private, liberal arts college that is much smaller than Washburn, with one‐quarter the student body and faculty. This paper examines the assessment experience of the two small institutions and compares the different advantages and disadvantages of using LibQual+TM within these two different types of small, academic institutions.

Findings

The study found that a larger response rate was realized than that of the larger of the two institutions, especially by faculty, and suggests that this is due to the nature of the small colleges where faculty and student body are more familial. The paper also describes LibQual+TM as a type of “turn‐key” survey process that is advantageous for small libraries with limited resources.

Originality/value

This paper provides new information on the value of LibQual+TM for assessment in small, academic institutions and describes the benefits of this assessment tool for libraries in much smaller settings.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

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Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2003

John B Harer

Academic libraries have endured rapid change in the past two decades that has had repercussions on how they manage their organization and deliver library services…

Abstract

Academic libraries have endured rapid change in the past two decades that has had repercussions on how they manage their organization and deliver library services. Skyrocketing costs, especially for journals, explosive growth in new technologies, fiscal exigencies caused by a tightening of public financing of most academic institutions, demands for greater accountability, and the onslaught of electronic delivery of networked information, are just some of the major obstacles libraries are encountering (Lubans, 1996; Riggs, 1993; Shaughnessy, 1987). Customers of academic libraries are increasingly less satisfied because of limited resources and the difficulties they encounter in accessing printed material in a traditional library facility (Doughtery, 1992). The emergence of textual materials in electronic form has added a new dimension to this discontent. While such resources have the potential for meeting the information needs more dynamically, the costs for information have been exorbitant, particularly since full electronic texts have not been sufficient in coverage to supplant printed resources (Tenopir, 1993). These phenomena require academic libraries to use a more integrated and flexible approach to problem solving (Gapen, Hampton & Schmitt, 1993).

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-206-1

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 November 2007

Abstract

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Content available
Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

Abstract

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New Library World, vol. 110 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Margaret Barwick

Describes a number of experiments with electronic documentdelivery, and the copyright problems that are affecting its use.Considers the inadequacies of interlending for…

Abstract

Describes a number of experiments with electronic document delivery, and the copyright problems that are affecting its use. Considers the inadequacies of interlending for the user, the interlending in Eastern Europe and Australia. Outlines the impact of CD‐ROM on document supply and suggests that interlending can be a social, cultural and economic measure.

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Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

James H. Sweetland and Peter G. Christensen

Reports on a comparison of the 1992 Lambda Book Award titles and a sample of titles reviewed in the Lambda Book Report with a control group of titles listed in Publishers

Abstract

Reports on a comparison of the 1992 Lambda Book Award titles and a sample of titles reviewed in the Lambda Book Report with a control group of titles listed in Publishers Weekly, “Forecasts”. Finds that while the Lambda Award titles received about the same number of reviews as the control group titles, the LBR sample received significantly fewer reviews. However, both samples of gay/lesbian/ bisexual books are held in significantly fewer OCLC libraries than are the control titles. Examines the content of reviews of sample books and finds that they show no apparent bias on the part of the reviewers.

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Collection Building, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1996

Sandra P. Price, Anne Morris and J. Eric Davies

This paper presents an overview of past and present research projects associated with electronic document delivery. The paper briefly outlines the Follet Report and…

Abstract

This paper presents an overview of past and present research projects associated with electronic document delivery. The paper briefly outlines the Follet Report and introduces the UK's Electronics Libraries Programme, including the recently funded Focused Investigation of Document Delivery (FIDDO) project at Loughborough University. Four research areas have been identified as follows: resource sharing projects; network communication projects; electronic scanning projects and electronic document delivery systems. Conclusions highlight the major impact that technological developments are currently having on this area, the need for librarians to reassess their role in the information chain, and the need for delivery systems capable of handling different formats and a wider coverage of material to satisfy requests.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2013

Ellen N. Sayed

This paper aims to describe the process of identifying, applying and assessing the balanced scorecard model on a five‐year, strategic plan in an academic, medical library…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the process of identifying, applying and assessing the balanced scorecard model on a five‐year, strategic plan in an academic, medical library two years into the five‐year period. The existing strategic plan consisted of eight inter‐connected pathways with multiple goals and objectives, generating a high volume of data, which made it difficult to track the implementation of the plan.

Design/methodology/approach

A research query seeking an alternative to the current strategic plan framework was developed and researched. This process identified the balanced scorecard as a possible successful alternative to the eight inter‐connected pathways in place. After the application of the balanced scorecard, a second query, with assessment criteria, was developed to determine if the balanced scorecard did, in fact, provide a better framework than the original plan.

Findings

The balanced scorecard restructured the eight pathways into four perspectives to create an aligned, cause‐and‐effect strategy. The original plan had too many themes to manage and lacked a cohesive strategy. Performance measures proved more meaningful and manageable in measuring the success of the strategic plan than the high volume of project management data. It was concluded that the balanced scorecard met the assessment criteria as a better framework for the strategic plan.

Practical implications

Aligning goals and objectives to form strategy simplified the implementation of the strategic plan. Performance measures focus on the performance of the organization, creating a process of continuous improvement.

Originality/value

While the balanced scorecard has been applied in academic libraries, this project successfully applied the model on a strategic plan two years after its implementation.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

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