Search results

1 – 10 of 32
Open Access
Article
Publication date: 12 June 2018

Kristina Palm and Johan Hansson

The purpose of this paper is to address the concept of participatory research (PR) in terms of its values and challenges in project work.

2663

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the concept of participatory research (PR) in terms of its values and challenges in project work.

Design/methodology/approach

A participative research approach was used in which researchers worked collaboratively with key stakeholders involved in the development of a digital network model for expert diagnostics. The approach involved research and data gathering in six work packages: first, participation at workshops, including the presentation of a preliminary research agenda; second, presentation of a revised research agenda; third, interviews with project managers and steering committee members; fourth, feedback sessions; fifth, participation at a project conference, including additional feedback sessions; and sixth, concluding interviews with project managers.

Findings

The findings suggest that PR might strengthen project work through challenging interview questions and clear feedback. PR might empower the project manager by illuminating challenges and possibilities in the project process.

Practical implications

Project managers may use PR as one strategy to empower project work.

Originality/value

Despite the vast research on projects and project management, researchers and practitioners are still looking for ways to advance project work. This paper contributes with knowledge on how PR may advance project work.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Håkan Uvhagen, Mia von Knorring, Henna Hasson, John Øvretveit and Johan Hansson

The purpose of this paper is to explore factors influencing early implementation and intermediate outcomes of a healthcare-academia partnership in a primary healthcare setting.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore factors influencing early implementation and intermediate outcomes of a healthcare-academia partnership in a primary healthcare setting.

Design/methodology/approach

The Academic Primary Healthcare Network (APHN) initiative was launched in 2011 in Stockholm County, Sweden and included 201 primary healthcare centres. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in 2013-2014 with all coordinating managers (n=8) and coordinators (n=4). A strategic change model framework was used to collect and analyse data.

Findings

Several factors were identified to aid early implementation: assignment and guidelines that allowed flexibility; supportive management; dedicated staff; facilities that enabled APHN actions to be integrated into healthcare practice; and positive experiences from research and educational activities. Implementation was hindered by: discrepancies between objectives and resources; underspecified guidelines that trigger passivity; limited research and educational activities; a conflicting non-supportive reimbursement system; limited planning; and organisational fragmentation. Intermediate outcomes revealed that various actions, informed by the APHN assignment, were launched in all APHNs.

Practical implications

The findings can be rendered applicable by preparing stakeholders in healthcare services to optimise early implementation of healthcare-academia partnerships.

Originality/value

This study increases understanding of interactions between factors that influence early stage partnerships between healthcare services and academia in primary healthcare settings.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 February 2020

Charlotte Klinga, Johan Hansson, Henna Hasson, Magna Andreen Sachs and Carolina Wannheden

The aim of this study was to identify key components of integrated mental health and social care services that contribute to value for service users in Sweden.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was to identify key components of integrated mental health and social care services that contribute to value for service users in Sweden.

Design/methodology/approach

An explorative research study design was used, based on data from four group interviews conducted in June and August 2017 with service user representatives.

Findings

The analysis resulted in eight subcategories reflecting components that were reported to contribute to value for service users. These subcategories were grouped into three main categories: (1) professionals who see and support the whole person, (2) organizational commitment to holistic care and (3) support for equal opportunities and active participation in society.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are primarily transferable to integrated mental health and social care services, as they emphasize key components that contribute to value for service users in these specific settings.

Practical implications

The complexity of integrated mental health and social care services requires coordination across the individual and organizational levels as well as ongoing dialogue and partnerships between service users, service user associations and health and social care organizations. In this integration, it is important that service users and service user associations not only are invited but also keen to participate in the design of care and support efforts.

Originality/value

Service User Associations (SUAs) can act as a bridge between county and municipal services through their participation in the development of local activities; at the regional and national levels, SUAs can help achieve more equitable integrated services. It is important that SUAs are not only invited but encouraged to actively participate in the design of such care and support efforts.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/09604520010318254. When citing the…

785

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/09604520010318254. When citing the article, please cite: Johan Hansson, (2000), “Quality in health care: medical or managerial?”, Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, Vol. 10 Iss: 2, pp. 78 - 81.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 14 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2013

Christer Sandahl, Helena Gustafsson, Carl‐Johan Wallin, Lisbet Meurling, John Øvretveit, Mats Brommels and Johan Hansson

This study aims to describe implementation of simulator‐based medical team training and the effect of this programme on inter‐professional working in an intensive care unit (ICU).

1839

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to describe implementation of simulator‐based medical team training and the effect of this programme on inter‐professional working in an intensive care unit (ICU).

Design/methodology/approach

Over a period of two years, 90 percent (n=152) of the staff of the general ICU at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden, received inter‐professional team training in a fully equipped patient room in their own workplace. A case study method was used to describe and explain the planning, formation, and results of the training programme.

Findings

In interviews, the participants reported that the training had increased their awareness of the importance of effective communication for patient safety. The intervention had even had an indirect impact by creating a need to talk, not only about how to communicate efficaciously, but also concerning difficult care situations in general. This, in turn, had led to regular reflection meetings for nurses held three times a week. Examples of better communication in acute situations were also reported. However, the findings indicate that the observed improvements will not last, unless organisational features such as staffing rotas and scheduling of rounds and meetings can be changed to enable use of the learned behaviours in everyday work. Other threats to sustainability include shortage of staff, overtime for staff, demands for hospital beds, budget cuts, and poor staff communication due to separate meetings for nurses and physicians.

Originality/value

The present results broaden our understanding of how to create and sustain an organizational system that supports medical team training.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

John Øvretveit, Magna Andreen‐Sachs, Jan Carlsson, Helena Gustafsson, Johan Hansson, Christina Keller, Susana Lofgren, Pamela Mazzocato, Sara Tolf and Mats Brommels

The purpose of this paper is to compare the implementation of 12 different organisation and management innovations (OMIs) in Swedish healthcare, to discover the generic and…

2341

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the implementation of 12 different organisation and management innovations (OMIs) in Swedish healthcare, to discover the generic and specific factors important for successful healthcare improvement change in a public health system.

Design/methodology/approach

Longitudinal cross‐case comparison of 12 case studies was employed, where each case study used a common framework for collecting data about the process of change, the content of the change, the context, and the intermediate and final outcomes.

Findings

Clinical leaders played a more important part in the development of these successful service innovations than managers. Strategies for and patterns of change implementation were found to differ according to the type of innovation. Internal organisational context factors played a significant role in the development of nearly all, but external factors did not. “Developmental evolution” better described the change process than “implementation”.

Research limitations/implications

The 12 cases were all of relatively successful change processes: some unsuccessful examples would have provided additional testing of the hypotheses about what would predict successful innovation which were used in the case comparison. The cross‐case comparative hypothesis testing method allows systematic comparison if the case data are collected using similar frameworks, but this approach to management research requires considerable resources and coordination.

Practical implications

Management innovations that improve patient care can be carried out successfully by senior clinicians, under certain circumstances. A systematic approach is important both for developing and adapting an innovation to a changing situation. A significant amount of time was required for all involved, which could be reduced by “fast‐tracking” approval for some types of change.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical report comparing longitudinal and contextualised findings from a number of case studies of different organisational and management healthcare innovations. The findings made possible explanations for success factors and useful practical recommendations for conditions needed to nurture such innovation in public healthcare.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Johan Hansson

Explores the notion that the introduction of total quality management (TQM) in the public health care sector indicates a conceptual break with a tradition in which the authority…

854

Abstract

Explores the notion that the introduction of total quality management (TQM) in the public health care sector indicates a conceptual break with a tradition in which the authority to define and interpret the meaning of medical practice has been located solely within the medical profession. It also serves to shift the focus of medical practice away from its contextual and interactional character towards numerical representations and codification in monetary terms. Further, it is argued that the realization of management ideals in everyday practice is dependent more on the availability of pre‐existing technologies and standard procedures than on the ingenuity of particular organizational and institutional actors. These arguments are illustrated with the reutilization for TQM purposes of “local incident reports” in a Swedish hospital organization.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 February 2012

Susanne Löfgren, Johan Hansson, John Øvretveit and Mats Brommels

The purpose of this paper is to describe and explain a clinician‐led improvement of a hip fracture care process in a university hospital, and to assess the results and factors…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe and explain a clinician‐led improvement of a hip fracture care process in a university hospital, and to assess the results and factors helping and hindering change implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper has a mixed methods case study design. Data collection was guided by a framework directing attention to the content and process of the change, its context and outcomes.

Findings

Using a multiprofessional project team, beneficial changes in the early parts of the care process were achieved, but inability to change surgical staff work practices meant that the original goal of operating patients within 24 hours was not reached. After three years, top management introduced a hospital‐wide process improvement programme, which “took over” the responsibility for improving hip fracture care.

Research implications/limitations

A clear vision why change is needed and what needs to be done, which is well communicated by a respected clinical leader, can motivate personnel, but other influences are also needed to bring about change. Without a plan agreed and supported by top management, changes are likely to be limited to parts of the process and improvements to patient care may be minimal. These and other findings may be applicable to similar situations in other services.

Originality/value

This case study is an illustration of both the strengths and the weaknesses of a “bottom‐up, clinician‐champion‐led improvement initiative” in a complex university hospital.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Sara Tolf, Monica E. Nyström, Carol Tishelman, Mats Brommels and Johan Hansson

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to increased understanding of the concept agile and its potential for hospital managers to optimize design of organizational structures…

2667

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to increased understanding of the concept agile and its potential for hospital managers to optimize design of organizational structures and processes to combine internal efficiency and external effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

An integrative review was conducted using the reSEARCH database. Articles met the following criteria: first, a definition of agility; second, descriptions of enablers of becoming an agile organization; and finally, discussions of agile on multiple organizational levels. In total, 60 articles qualified for the final analysis.

Findings

Organizational agility rests on the assumption that the environment is uncertain, ranging from frequently changing to highly unpredictable. Proactive, reactive or embracive coping strategies were described as possible ways to handle such uncertain environments. Five organizational capacities were derived as necessary for hospitals to use the strategies optimally: transparent and transient inter-organizational links; market sensitivity and customer focus; management by support for self-organizing employees; organic structures that are elastic and responsive; flexible human and resource capacity for timely delivery. Agile is portrayed as either the “new paradigm” following lean, the needed development on top of a lean base, or as complementary to lean in distinct hybrid strategies.

Practical implications

Environmental uncertainty needs to be matched with coping strategies and organizational capacities to design processes responsive to real needs of health care. This implies that lean and agile can be combined to optimize the design of hospitals, to meet different variations in demand and create good patient management.

Originality/value

While considerable value has been paid to strategies to improve the internal efficiency within hospitals, this review raise the attention to the value of strategies of external effectiveness.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

197

Abstract

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

1 – 10 of 32