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Article
Publication date: 26 January 2021

Joan F. Marques

To encourage those who feel victimized by the tendency of “othering” or being part of an “outgroup” in any organization, in perceiving this reality from a more constructive angle.

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Abstract

Purpose

To encourage those who feel victimized by the tendency of “othering” or being part of an “outgroup” in any organization, in perceiving this reality from a more constructive angle.

Design/methodology/approach

A reflective viewpoint, supported by observations, conversations, and readings.

Findings

Othering exists, but it is a perspective that we can choose as a source of oppression or growth.

Practical implications

Considering the five ideas in this article can assist readers in becoming more resilient and positive members of their work- and other environments.

Social implications

As more people decide to rethink othering, the ridiculousness of the entire tendency may get deposed, and othering may become an obsolete behavioral pattern.

Originality/value

Presenting five ideas pertaining to performance excellence, making a constructive difference, keeping a mindset of elevating rather than defeating perspectives, maintaining dignity, and moving to new horizons. Through these five ideas, the author proposes a constructive perspective to a trend that is usually considered discriminatory and subjugating.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Joan F. Marques

The aim of this paper is reaffirming the real purpose of studying, working, and acquiring a decent lifestyle, which is happiness.

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is reaffirming the real purpose of studying, working, and acquiring a decent lifestyle, which is happiness.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper includes reflections on workshops with professionals, coaching insights, and literature review.

Findings

Attaining happiness is not necessarily dependent on our employer but on our perception of our work. If our mind is at ease, and our outlook is positive, our work can be joy, and we can tread our personal path of happiness.

Practical implications

May serve as a source of self-reflection to readers and potential reconsideration of the reasons behind their professional performance: while earning money is important to pay the bills and care for our families, we owe it to ourselves to be happy while doing it. Finding contentment in our work is the critical step to enjoying it and, thus, being happy doing it.

Social implications

Individuals who focus on acquiring and maintaining their own happiness will be more likely to also exude positive energy to others, thus elevating the chances of these others to pursue happiness as well.

Originality/value

This is a call for refocusing on the true purpose of all our actions. While it is actually rather simple, we seem to keep losing focus and digress into converting means into ends, while disregarding the real end of all our actions, which is happiness.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 March 2019

Joan F. Marques

The purpose of this paper is to challenge current and future organizational managers toward engaging in a process of reflecting on the purpose of their performance and the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to challenge current and future organizational managers toward engaging in a process of reflecting on the purpose of their performance and the purpose of the organization they serve and also to challenge management educators and coaches to reflect on the emphasis of their training of those who will step into management positions.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews the current criticism on organizational management education and practice, and brings global inequality in the scope to underscore the importance of correcting a flawed system based on a flawed perspective.

Findings

It is critical to change the narrative the authors use for management in organizations from, “organizations exist to maximize the value of their shareholders, and the managers in those organizations need to ensure that this happens” to, “organizations exist to support the communities in which they operate, and managers in those organizations need to ensure that this happens.”

Practical implications

Organizational managers will focus on a more socially acceptable set of priorities when adopting the narrative promoted in this paper. Business educators will focus on more transdisciplinary approaches to help their students think beyond self-centered and sheer profit-based boundaries, and plant seeds toward constructive and morally sound social change early on.

Social implications

Communities will fare much better when the organizations in their areas will focus more on well-being of those who reside in the community rather than a handful of often absent shareholders.

Originality/value

This paper questions the core of organizational existence and managerial performance therein. It reaches beyond technological, operational, and tactical levels of performance and questions the grand strategy of organizational existence and performance.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 July 2008

Joan F. Marques

The purpose of this paper is to review the phenomenon of moral principles as they have been adopted over time. The paper specifically reviews the Golden Rule, and the…

534

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the phenomenon of moral principles as they have been adopted over time. The paper specifically reviews the Golden Rule, and the subsequently formulated Platinum Rule. While the value of both these rules is underscored, the paper also reviews their weaknesses in light of our new millennium awareness of increased globality and ensuing interconnectedness. The paper makes a statement that even moral principles that have been around for centuries, may have to be reevaluated in light of changed circumstances, and conclusively presents “The Spiritual Rule,” a principle that eliminates the risk of excessive arbitrariness, and calls for consideration of all life on earth in every decision we make.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a conceptual paper, reflecting on two existing principles that influence the way human beings, and therefore managers as well, make their decisions in general. The author first briefly reviews both principles (or “rules”), subsequently analyzes their weaknesses in light of contemporary developments, and ultimately introduces a new principle, the spiritual rule, thereby drawing on supporting statements various researchers and authors with in‐depth consideration of modern days' developments in human interaction.

Findings

When one wants to engage in “good business” in these and future days, one can no longer merely focus on a one‐on‐one perspective, or limit ourselves to the stakes of only two parties. There are greater interests at stake and there are larger groups of people involved in our decisions. Individualism has proven its merit, but so has collectivism. The awareness that is dawning upon us these days is that no extreme is of lasting benefit to all of us. A well‐considered blend of various strategies, resulting from openness to other ways of thinking, is the enlightened behavioral paradigm in and outside of the workplace.

Practical implications

There are many complicated theories out there about how leaders should make their decisions. However, what works best is a simple guideline that can be used in all situations and environments and that is based on the realization that human beings are first and foremost interconnected spiritual entities. This paper addresses this need and identifies the important practical considerations that leaders will need to include in their decisions.

Originality/value

The paper's unique contribution is to offer a moral principle that incorporates the spiritual dimension in every area of decision‐making. The three considerations presented in this paper, reduction of selfish reflections, reduction of unjust assessments of other's wishes, and reduction of harm to the welfare of our planet, are on target with the trends toward global interconnectedness and encourage leaders to consider the value of implementing and maintaining the spiritual rule.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 16 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 June 2008

Joan F. Marques

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate spiritual performance from the perspective of a globally operating corporation.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate spiritual performance from the perspective of a globally operating corporation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses spirituality at work as its subject‐matter and takes the form of a literature review. The paper approaches the topic by: giving a general overview of the shift in global corporate behavior; a short historical review of American business culture; defining workplace spirituality; examining Starbucks Corporation's performance from three angles: suppliers and societies, employees, and customers; and a conclusion and postscript.

Findings

The paper finds that: spiritual behavior at the organizational level does lead to enhanced corporate performance; workplace spirituality, when encouraged by top management, is oftentimes instigated by personal life experiences; and spiritual behavior, at the organizational level, leads to advantages for multiple stakeholders.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations to the research are that the research findings were of a secondary nature. The information was gathered through massive readings, but not through primary research‐gathering processes. This study only reviews the performance of one major corporate entity, which reduces the justification of generalizability. Suggestions for future research would be: applying primary studies on a broader sample of globally operating entities to measure their spiritual performance; and formulating particular standards for this type of measurement.

Practical implications

The practical implications are that globally operating but also smaller entities may start scrutinizing their performance toward stakeholders in a more spiritual light.

Originality/value

New in this paper is the: viewpoint of the Starbucks corporation as a spiritually performing entity; reflection of this major corporation's behavior in three dimensions: toward employees, customers, and suppliers and societies; and reflection of the elements of the definition used here for spirit at work on Starbucks' performance.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Joan F. Marques

– The purpose of this paper is to underscore the need for wakeful leadership, which is manifested through regular reflection.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to underscore the need for wakeful leadership, which is manifested through regular reflection.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by a leadership scholar/practitioner based on a blend of theory and practice.

Findings

Today’s leadership, whether in a formal or informal setting, and whether with others involved or not, requires reflection to refrain from mindless continuance of obsolete mindsets and behaviors.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking aimed at constructively influencing current and future leaders.

Originality/value

A brief but critical emphasis on the urgent need of reflectively leading ourselves, others and our organizations today, considering past and future.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 February 2011

Joan F. Marques

Discusses the criteria for contemporary leadership as perceived by 200 working business and management students.

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Abstract

Purpose

Discusses the criteria for contemporary leadership as perceived by 200 working business and management students.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explains the multiple, sometimes contradicting perspectives that exist about leadership, after which it presents the findings from a collection of assessment feedback from 200 working business and management students on what leadership should entail, what is indispensable for leaders, and what the main differences are between leaders and managers.

Findings

Leadership is an evolving phenomenon: not only as a research subject, but even more as an experience in our own lives.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are presented as a viewpoint in this article, even though the data were gathered over the course of three years (nine course sessions). The fact that the study participants were all residing and working in the Los Angeles area should be considered in reviewing the findings.

Practical implications

Leadership is no longer a characteristic of a precious few, but is now more commonly understood as a way of living for all of us.

Social implications

When everyone starts perceiving him‐ or herself as a leader, the general sense of responsibility may get elevated.

Originality/value

The paper presents leadership as a quality that we all can harbor and understand.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Joan F. Marques

Business Schools have received much criticism up to, and definitely after, the most recent economic meltdown. Management education in particular, whether at the

Abstract

Purpose

Business Schools have received much criticism up to, and definitely after, the most recent economic meltdown. Management education in particular, whether at the undergraduate or graduate level, has come under scrutiny, and the pressure is on to make management education more aligned with contemporary workforce needs. This paper aims to review the validity of this demand, and offer some options to prepare current students for the volatile work environment that awaits them.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on the author's experiences as a management educator, and her observations of the changed nature of management, hence, the changed needs to educate this phenomenon.

Findings

Reflections are offered on what is perceived as possible ways for management educators to prepare future workforce members for management in a rapidly changing work environment. This is presented in a unifying, three-tier approach: 1. Connection: Establishing interaction with current workforce members and situations. 2. Completion: Ensuring a well-rounded approach by including interdisciplinary elements in our education. 3. Comprehension: Instilling the eagerness to become lifelong learners. In addition, the changed nature of work and the inability to optimally prepare future workforce members for jobs and careers that yet have to come into existence are underscored.

Originality/value

The paper presents an overview of alternative facilitative approaches and insights based on in-depth review of-, and extensive engagement in management education.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Joan F. Marques

This article is an encouragement to current and future business leaders and members of the corporate world to carefully scrutinize their ethical considerations and…

511

Abstract

Purpose

This article is an encouragement to current and future business leaders and members of the corporate world to carefully scrutinize their ethical considerations and actions. It has become all too easy to find justifications for a hit and run mentality, which is the very foundation for the growing inequality in the world.

Design/methodology/approach

A comparison of data gathered over the course of two years (six courses), captured in responses from workforce members in an MBA program to two moral-based questions.

Findings

The data demonstrated that a consistent percentage (35 percent) seeks to justify selfish, unethical behavior.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are based on a population of workers from a multitude of industries, yet within the same geographic and cultural setting. Even though this population represented a broad variation of ethnicities, the local culture may have influenced their moral views. It would be recommended to ask the two questions listed in this article in other cultures as well in order to compare findings.

Practical implications

While 35 percent is not a majority, it is still a significant number, hence, a good reason for concern, as this is a population of future business leaders.

Originality/value

The message in this article is presented through the acronym KARMA, in which each letter represents the initial of a critical point of consideration: kindness, attitude, responsibility, mindfulness, and actions.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 October 2010

Joan F. Marques

The purpose of this study was to determine the difference between workplace spirituality and office politics on basis of the fact that outwardly, these phenomena can look…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to determine the difference between workplace spirituality and office politics on basis of the fact that outwardly, these phenomena can look confusingly alike.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was conducted in a single question format, and treated as a short case study, with 40 participants, who all responded in writing during a workshop.

Findings

The study brought forth the insight that, while workplace spirituality and office politics may initially look alike, they derive from entirely different origins, utilize different strategies, and lead to different outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

The participants in this study were all based in Los Angeles, and well aware of the definitions of the two phenomena. The study might deliver more or different results in other environments.

Practical implications

The action methods used in either of the two phenomena should provide management proper insight into the one that is predominantly dealt with in their workplace, and by whom.

Originality/value

This study may be helpful to those who mistake political maneuvers for spiritual behavior vice versa. While it requires some deeper examination before drawing a conclusion, the symptoms are apparent. Workforce members and corporations as a whole may benefit from the findings of this paper, which confirm that political motives may lead to faster outcomes, but not to lasting performance excellence, as they will ultimately become transparent and lead to negative long‐term outcomes. Spiritual motives, on the other hand, will lead to the exact opposite: slower, but lasting progress and well‐being for the organization and its stakeholders.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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