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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Ibrahim Alnawas and Jane Hemsley-Brown

Using the resource-based view (RBV), the purpose of this paper is to examine the potential mediation effect of customer relationship management capability, branding…

Abstract

Purpose

Using the resource-based view (RBV), the purpose of this paper is to examine the potential mediation effect of customer relationship management capability, branding capability and service innovation capability on the established link between market orientation (MO) and hotel performance. It further investigates the complementarity between these capabilities in relation to hotel performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey data were collected from 216 UK hotels. AMOS 23 was used to analyse the research data.

Findings

The link between MO and hotel performance appears to be indirect via customer relationship capability, branding capability and service innovation capability. The three capabilities also appear to play different complementary roles when affecting hotel performance.

Practical implications

The current study offers hotel managers a ranking of the contribution of individual capabilities to hotel performance. It also helps them to make better investment decisions in developing the right capability combinations to enhance their hotel performance.

Originality/value

The research is based on integrating MO and RBV into a single framework to gain a deeper understanding of the relationship between MO and high-order marketing capabilities and how these factors shape hotel performance.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Jane Hemsley‐Brown and John Humphreys

States that the number of enrolled nurse conversions completed during the last ten years has had a significant impact on the number of registered nurses (RNs) available…

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Abstract

States that the number of enrolled nurse conversions completed during the last ten years has had a significant impact on the number of registered nurses (RNs) available for employment in the National Health Service (NHS), and the contribution made by the enrolled nurse conversion course programme to the National Health Service workforce may have delayed the impact of the “demographic time bomb” on nursing recruitment. Emphasizes that the winding down of the conversion programme, and a fall in the number of RNs employed in the NHS, combined with a decline in entries to preregistration (initial) training, could signal the beginning of the long‐awaited crisis facing the nursing profession.

Details

Health Manpower Management, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-2065

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Article
Publication date: 12 December 2016

Jane Hemsley-Brown and Ibrahim Alnawas

The purpose of this study is three-fold: first, to examine the extent to which service quality (SQ) affects the three components of emotional brand attachment (EBA) (brand…

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7579

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is three-fold: first, to examine the extent to which service quality (SQ) affects the three components of emotional brand attachment (EBA) (brand passion, brand affection and self-brand connection); second, to investigate the extent to which these three components influence brand loyalty; and third, to test the mediation effect of the components of EBA on the SQ–loyalty relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 355 respondents using an online panel in the UK. Smart PLS2.0 was used to analyze the data.

Findings

Three key findings emerge: first, compared to staff behavior, physical environment tends to have a stronger and more significant effect on the three elements of EBA. Second, brand passion and self-brand connection fully mediate the SQ–loyalty relationship, whereas brand affection partially mediates the same relationship. Finally, the SQ–EBA–loyalty relationship is significantly stronger for repeat visitors compared to first-time visitors.

Practical implications

Hotel brands need to design their facilities and décor and develop guest experiences based on symbolic values and deep emotional aspects. Offering employees customer care training and adopting a consumer-centric, relational, storytelling approach are particularly important to inspire and captivate hotels’ customers and to build and shape profound and enduring affective ties between the hotel brand and its customers.

Originality/value

The findings offer new insights through examining the symbolic consumption and emotional aspects of a guest’s hotel experience as mediators to the SQ–loyalty relationship. The findings also add to the growing body of knowledge of the antecedents of EBA through identifying physical environment and staff behavior as key determinants of EBA.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1997

Jane Hemsley‐Brown

Discusses the interpretation of nursing statistics, the problem of counting how many nurses there are in the workforce, and the need to be aware of how statistics are…

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2554

Abstract

Discusses the interpretation of nursing statistics, the problem of counting how many nurses there are in the workforce, and the need to be aware of how statistics are compiled when presenting numerical data to support arguments relating to nursing and the nursing workforce. Argues that NHS workforce statistics provide considerable evidence for claiming that there is a significant decline in the number of nursing staff doing the work of nursing in the NHS. Explains that although there was an increase in the number of qualified nurses working in the NHS throughout the 1980s (over a ten‐year period the number of qualified nurses increased by 22 per cent), the increase in qualified nursing staff has not compensated for the loss of student learners in the workforce. Emphasizes that during the last three years for which figures are available, however, these gains have been wiped out, and the number of qualified nurses has declined to pre‐Project 2000 levels.

Details

Health Manpower Management, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-2065

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2018

Ibrahim Alnawas and Jane Hemsley-Brown

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to examine the differential effect of two cognitive (i.e. product experience, outcome focussed) and two emotional experiences…

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1745

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to examine the differential effect of two cognitive (i.e. product experience, outcome focussed) and two emotional experiences (i.e. surprise and immersion) on customers’ cognitive outcomes (i.e. satisfaction, trust and value), and customers’ emotional outcomes (i.e. passion, connection and affection); and second, to test the differential effect of customers’ cognitive and emotional outcomes on switching resistance loyalty (SRL).

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 843 respondents using an online panel in the UK. Structural equation modelling was employed to analyse the data (AMOS 18.0).

Findings

First, cognitive experiences had a more significant effect on customers’ cognitive outcomes compared to their effect on customers’ emotional outcomes. Second, emotional experiences had a more significant effect on customers’ emotional outcomes compared to their effect on customers’ cognitive outcomes. Third, the impact of customers’ emotional outcomes on SRL was not significantly higher compared to that of customers’ cognitive outcomes. Fourth, the indirect effect of cognitive experiences on SRL was significantly higher, compared to that of emotional experiences.

Originality/value

The key contribution of this research stems from examining the differential effect of cognitive and emotional experiences on different consumers’ cognitive and emotional outcomes, thus providing deeper insights into the nature of the relationship between such variables.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2012

Izhar Oplatka and Jane Hemsley-Brown

This chapter presents an analysis of data gathered from Israeli primary and secondary schoolteachers that tested the degree of market orientation in the Israeli State…

Abstract

This chapter presents an analysis of data gathered from Israeli primary and secondary schoolteachers that tested the degree of market orientation in the Israeli State Education System, the largest system in Israel that is based on grade configuration of primary education (1–6) and secondary education (7–12). It was found that the Israeli teachers are more positive about student orientation (SO) than about competitor orientation and interfunctional coordination, i.e., they are more likely to be positive toward the elements of SO that are emotion embedded and represent teachers’ concern toward and relations with their students. They can identify with elements of SO that represent teachers’ strong emotional commitment toward students, which in turn leads them to change their teaching methods, be attentive and responsive to parents’ interest in the learning of the child, and improve their own teaching. In doing so, the teachers are engaged unconsciously with relationship marketing that might promote their school's market share and image.

Details

The Management and Leadership of Educational Marketing: Research, Practice and Applications
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-242-4

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Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2012

Hsiao-Pei (Sophie) Yang and Julie Robson

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to develop a conceptual framework that provides insight and aids understanding of the complex array of relationships schools have…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to develop a conceptual framework that provides insight and aids understanding of the complex array of relationships schools have with individuals, organizations, and other entities.

Design/methodology/approach – The conceptual framework is drawn from the relationship marketing (RM) literature and applied to a school context in the United Kingdom. In doing so, it provides a simplified representation of the environment in which schools operate and a valuable classification structure for the many different relationships a school has. This framework will be of benefit to both academics and practitioners.

Findings – The authors find that the relationships schools have can be classified within the conceptual framework. The framework aids understanding of the different relationships and provides insights into how these relationships can be developed and where value can be added. Application of the framework also highlights the complex nature of the relationships schools can have with others and the need to manage those relationships well.

Research implications – The framework developed in this chapter is conceptual and needs to be tested empirically.

Originality/value – This chapter responds to the call from Oplatka and Hemsley-Brown (2004) to provide further research into the area of RM in the context of schools. It adds value by drawing together various aspects of RM, providing an analysis of their relevance to educational services marketing and identifying and applying a conceptual framework which classifies the relationships schools have with others. This chapter provides important insights for those within schools who are responsible for the management of relationships with their organization and for others seeking to foster greater engagement with schools.

Details

The Management and Leadership of Educational Marketing: Research, Practice and Applications
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-242-4

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Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2012

Jane Hemsley-Brown and Izhar Oplatka

The purpose of this final chapter is to draw together the conclusions and insights presented in each of the chapters throughout the book, to summarize and categorize…

Abstract

The purpose of this final chapter is to draw together the conclusions and insights presented in each of the chapters throughout the book, to summarize and categorize concisely the findings, and to offer views about the next steps in the field of education marketing. The chapter is presented under key headings which emerge from the edited book chapters: market-led leadership, building relationships, and relationship marketing. The final section discusses a way forward for education marketing research and practice.

The chapter seeks to draw together and make sense of the insights from all the chapters under key headings to provide the reader of the volume with some key ideas to take forward for practice and research in the field.

Details

The Management and Leadership of Educational Marketing: Research, Practice and Applications
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-242-4

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2010

Jane Hemsley-Brown and Anthony Lowrie

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2449

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Jane Hemsley‐Brown

For many management researchers, it is important that the knowledge they create is utilised and has some impact on managerial practice. Sustainable competitive advantage…

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1830

Abstract

For many management researchers, it is important that the knowledge they create is utilised and has some impact on managerial practice. Sustainable competitive advantage depends less on who has the information and increasingly on those able to make the best use of that information. This paper focuses on two key questions: what are the barriers to research utilisation and what are the most effective strategies for facilitating the use of research by managers in the public sector, based on research evidence? The approach entailed extensive searches of on‐line databases in the fields of management, education and medicine, from the UK, USA, Canada, Australia and Europe. Key themes to emerge from this review were the accessibility and relevance of research, trust and credibility; the gap between researchers and users, and organisational factors. Research use can be facilitated through: support and training; collaboration and partnership; dissemination strategies; networks; and strong, visible leadership.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

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