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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2021

Simon Stephens, Isobel Cunningham and Yousra Kabir

The purpose of this paper is to develop an understanding of the impact that a crisis such as that created by COVID-19 has on entrepreneurs. The authors focus on female…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an understanding of the impact that a crisis such as that created by COVID-19 has on entrepreneurs. The authors focus on female entrepreneurs and their ability and propensity to continue their entrepreneurial journey.

Design/methodology/approach

For each respondent (n = 113), data was collected using an online survey. The survey was distributed in April 2020 during a nationwide lockdown and again in September 2020 as the economy reopened. In completing the survey, respondents were asked a series of multiple-choice questions and a series of open-ended questions.

Findings

The authors present data characterizing the female entrepreneurs, their experience during a time of crisis and the enablers and disablers to the continuation of their entrepreneurial journey. The key findings that emerge from this study include the resilience of the female entrepreneurs, their willingness to contribute to community-based organizations during a crisis and their desire to seek and receive support from their peers.

Originality/value

The findings from this study provide novel insights with regard to the resources and strategies used by female entrepreneurs during a time of crisis. The data was collected during two periods of great uncertainty for the entrepreneurs and at times when their availability was extremely limited.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2012

Isobel Cunningham, Sharon Loane and Pat Ibbotson

This study aims to investigate the internationalisation strategies of small games development firms from Poland and Hungary.

1385

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the internationalisation strategies of small games development firms from Poland and Hungary.

Design/methodology/approach

This enquiry adopts a qualitative approach, whereby firms were identified from online searches, and secondary information was sought on each firm prior to in‐depth interview, in order to highlight the issues relating to internationalisation/growth.

Findings

The paper provides evidence that small games development firms undertake rapid internationalisation, despite resource constraints. Firms were founded by teams of entrepreneurs who unlike many other international entrepreneurs, did not have a priori experience, sometimes moving from being hobbyists into commercial operations. These often exist in a pre‐natal phase some years before formal incorporation, an important phase when many of the resources required are sourced. The findings show only partial support for RBV, as these firms were acquiring and controlling resources from their environment on a freelance and low commitment basis. The authors speculate that these firms display dynamic capabilities of the highest order in order to do so.

Research/limitations/implications

This enquiry adds to understanding of the (international) growth strategies of small games development firms, and gives insight into how they access dynamic capabilities. However, the number of firms investigated is small and from two Eastern European countries, therefore further larger scale research should be undertaken.

Originality/value

Based on this exploration new insights are developed with regard to an under researched sector, and how such firms undertake rapid internationational growth, despite being particularly resource constrained. In particular, the entrpreneurs in these firms have little experience and creatively acquire and control resources in order to grow rapidly. The authors speculate that they display advanced dynamic capabilities.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 February 2014

94

Abstract

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 13 May 2022

Tim Hilken, Mathew Chylinski, Ko de Ruyter, Jonas Heller and Debbie Isobel Keeling

The authors explore neuro-enhanced reality (NeR) as a novel approach for enhancing service communication between customers, frontline employees, and service organizations that…

3044

Abstract

Purpose

The authors explore neuro-enhanced reality (NeR) as a novel approach for enhancing service communication between customers, frontline employees, and service organizations that extends beyond current state-of-the-art approaches based on augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors first take stock of research on reality-enhanced service communication with AR and VR, then complement these insights with emerging neuroscientific research to conceptualize how NeR enables innovative forms of service communication. On this basis, the authors develop a research agenda to guide the future study and managerial exploitation of NeR.

Findings

AR and VR already offer unique affordances for digital-to-physical communication, but these can be extended with NeR. Specifically, NeR supports neuro-to-digital and digital-to-neuro communication based on neuroimaging (e.g. controlling digital content through thought) and neurostimulation (e.g. eliciting brain responses based on digital content). This provides a basis for outlining possible applications of NeR across service settings.

Originality/value

The authors advance knowledge on reality-enhanced service communication with AR and VR, whilst also demonstrating how neuroscientific research can be extended from understanding brain activity to generating novel service interactions.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 33 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1992

Quebec was the first Canadian jurisdiction to legislate on pay equality. It did so through the adoption of the Charter of Rights and Freedom, in 1976, a passive legislation since…

Abstract

Quebec was the first Canadian jurisdiction to legislate on pay equality. It did so through the adoption of the Charter of Rights and Freedom, in 1976, a passive legislation since it is based on complaints. It seems to be a matter of time before the Quebec Government passes a pro‐active legislation on pay equity and, in doing so, it will likely draw its inspiration from the Pay Equity Act (PEA) passed by the Ontario Government in 1987. One of PEAs important features is the emphasis on institutional structures and practices in determining the appropriate unit for the purpose of achieving pay equity. In practice, such units will often match up with the usual job families (e.g. clerical or office vs production jobs). However, the historical development of jobs families is intertwined with the evolution of occupational segregation between men and women in the labour markets.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1947

A CORRESPONDENT complains that he has undertaken a course for his final examination, after spending six years from Dunkirk to the Elbe far removed from library opportunities—only…

Abstract

A CORRESPONDENT complains that he has undertaken a course for his final examination, after spending six years from Dunkirk to the Elbe far removed from library opportunities—only to find that librarians and libraries are building up their staffs now. The Times Literary Supplement, he says, carries column after column of advertisements of desirable posts for which he, as he thinks, is a desirable and legitimate aspirant, but he is barred by his academic obligations. This appears to be a genuine grievance and we place it first in these notes in the hope that authorities, and especially librarians, may be induced to consider it. It may be answered that there is a present urgent need to tune up libraries of every kind to meet the great public need and that many of them have already waited some years. It is perhaps a pity that they did not wait a little longer so that the men who deserve most of the country could have been brought into the competition.

Details

New Library World, vol. 49 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 16 November 2012

Rosalind H. Whiting

The purpose of this paper is to explore the changes in gender‐biased employment practices that it is perceived have occurred in New Zealand accountancy workplaces over the last 30…

1246

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the changes in gender‐biased employment practices that it is perceived have occurred in New Zealand accountancy workplaces over the last 30 years, using Oliver's model of deinstitutionalization.

Design/methodology/approach

Sequential interviewing was carried out with 69 experienced chartered accountants and three human resource managers, and at a later date with nine young female accountants.

Findings

Evidence is presented of perceived political, functional and social pressures cumulatively contributing to deinstitutionalization of overt gender‐biased employment practices, with social and legislative changes being the most influential. Deinstitutionalization appears incomplete as some more subtle gender‐biased practices still remain in New Zealand's accountancy workplaces, relating particularly to senior‐level positions.

Research limitations/implications

This study adds to understanding of how professions evolve. The purposeful bias in the sample selection, the small size of two of the interviewee groups, and the diversity in the interviewees' workplaces are recognized limitations.

Practical implications

Identification of further cultural change is required to deinstitutionalize the more subtle gender‐biased practices in accountancy organizations. This could help to avoid a serious deficiency of senior chartered accountants in practice in the future.

Originality/value

This paper represents one of a limited number of empirical applications of the deinstitutionalization model to organizational change and is the first to address the issue of gender‐biased practices in a profession. The use of sequential interviewing of different age groups, in order to identify and corroborate perceptions of organizational change is a novel approach.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

Keywords

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