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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2019

Samuel Ssekajja Mayanja, Joseph Mapeera Ntayi, John C. Munene, James R.K. Kagaari, Waswa Balunywa and Laura Orobia

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating role of ecologies of innovation in the relationship between positive deviance (PD) and entrepreneurial networking…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating role of ecologies of innovation in the relationship between positive deviance (PD) and entrepreneurial networking among small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey design using quantitative approach was employed in this study. Data were collected with the help of self-administrated questionnaires from 228 SMEs. Systematic sampling technique was used. Multiple regression data were analysed with the help of SPSS software.

Findings

The results indicated that ecologies of innovation partially mediate the relationship between PD and entrepreneurial networking. Besides, PD and entrepreneurial networking are significantly related.

Research limitations/implications

The data were cross-sectional in nature, thus limiting monitoring changes in resources accessed from social networks by entrepreneurs over time.

Practical implications

Managers of SMEs and policy makers should pay more attention to the views of employees with divergent views, ecologies of innovation in creating a conducive environment for creativity and innovation among SMEs.

Originality/value

The study of PD, ecologies of innovation and entrepreneurial networking using complexity theory among SMEs in Uganda is a contribution to literature.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

Mark D. Griffiths, Lisa Gundry, Jill Kickul and Angeles Muñoz Fernandez

The purpose of this paper is to examine the governmental, economic, and technological factors contributing to a country's innovation ecology that have an impact on…

1730

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the governmental, economic, and technological factors contributing to a country's innovation ecology that have an impact on sustainable economic growth.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper investigates governmental, economic, and technological supports that comprise the innovation ecology of 34 nations using ordinary least squares, discriminant analysis, and mediated regression. It is proposed that the strength of a country's innovation ecology is associated with greater sustainable entrepreneurial growth opportunities. Innovation indicators and trend analyses were collected from Eurostat Yearbook 2007, Science and Technology, and Global Financial Data over the 1995‐2005 period.

Findings

The results reveal that while the influence of government and the economic environment encourage innovation ecology, having resources at the research and development levels, human capital, and early seed funding were key indicators of innovation. The greater the degree of research and development, the availability of a highly skilled labor force, and the amount of private and public venture capital funding, the more likely it is that a strong national innovation ecology will emerge leading to the creation of new business ideas and growth opportunities.

Originality/value

The results contribute to the understanding of the significant role of innovation investment for new business development and growth.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 22 July 2011

Lisa K. Gundry, Jill R. Kickul, Mark D. Griffiths and Sophie C. Bacq

Social entrepreneurship is primarily concerned with the development of innovative solutions to society's most challenging problems. Since social entrepreneurship…

Abstract

Social entrepreneurship is primarily concerned with the development of innovative solutions to society's most challenging problems. Since social entrepreneurship flourishes in resource-constrained environments, social innovation may depend on the extent to which social entrepreneurs can combine and apply the resources at hand in creative and useful ways to solve problems – “bricolage.” Moreover, innovating for social impact relies on a set of institutional and structural supports – “innovation ecology,' which can facilitate or impede innovation. Our research empirically examines these variables as drivers of systemic social change through scaling and replication – “catalytic innovation” (i.e., the development of products and services targeted to unserved markets). Results of a survey conducted with 113 social entrepreneurs indicate that, while innovation ecology is associated with the degree of catalytic innovation, it is mediated by the role and degree of bricolage that social entrepreneurs bring to solving problems. These findings reinforce the role of entrepreneurs as the indispensable agents of social change.

Details

Social and Sustainable Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-073-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Ron Dvir and Edna Pasher

Innovation is the process of turning knowledge and ideas into value. An “urban innovation engine” is a system which can trigger, generate, foster and catalyze innovation

6724

Abstract

Innovation is the process of turning knowledge and ideas into value. An “urban innovation engine” is a system which can trigger, generate, foster and catalyze innovation in the city. This paper describes the concept of the “urban innovation engine”, provides some historical and contemporary examples, and suggests a set of guidelines for turning ordinary urban institutions into innovation engines. The paper has two purposes: to trigger further theoretic and action research and exploration in the domain of urban innovation. In recent years there has been intensive research about the conditions (“ecology”) which enable and catalyze knowledge development and innovation in the business world. A second new focus area in the research of knowledge development is the role of the city as a hub for intensive flows and exchanges of knowledge among its habitants and additional stakeholders. We suggest weaving the learning from the business and urban worlds by attempting to apply the dimensions of innovation ecology models to knowledge cities. More specifically, we look at multiple traditional urban constructs, and show how they might act as significant drivers for creativity and renewal. Typically an urban innovation engine is a complex system that includes people, relationships, values, processes, tools and technological, physical and financial infrastructure. We suggest that what innovation engines really do is to create conversations – which are the foundation of most innovations. We bring some examples and snap‐shots from several urban innovation engines such as the museum, the library, the stock exchange, the café, the brownfield, the grand fair, the outlook tower, and the industrial district. The paper conceptualizes the notion of “urban innovation engines”. Based on this concept, it provides a set of guidelines for creating a knowledge city using innovation engines as its building blocks, and innovation ecology elements as an important part of its operating system.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2009

Walter Bataglia and Dimária Silva E. Meirelles

The purpose of this paper is to identify complementarities between the approaches of population ecology and evolutionary economics in order to contribute to a synthesis of…

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to identify complementarities between the approaches of population ecology and evolutionary economics in order to contribute to a synthesis of organizational evolutionary dynamics and its implications for a strategic management research model. Using the metatriangulation technique to construct theories, we attempt to entwine these two perspectives. The proposed model is structured in two dimensions: the environmental selective system and the corporate adaptation process. The environmental selective system gathers together the complementary factors presented by evolutionary economics and ecology: technological innovation, demographic processes, environmental dynamism, population density and other institutional processes, and interpopulation dynamics. As ecology does not encompass the corporate adaptation process (generation, selection, and propagation of variations), the proposed model adopts the theoretical grounds underpinning evolutionary economics. The model offers three main contributions for future research into strategic management. First, it allows the development of descriptive and normative studies of the relationship among the environmental selection factors and the different types of enterprise strategies. Second, the proposed conceptual framework may be very beneficial for studies of interorganizational learning. Third, the model has the advantage of responding to the criticism of strategy theories in terms of their inability to generalize.

Details

Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 October 2007

Ron Dvir, Fiona Lettice, Carol Webb and Yael Schwartzberg

To present a generic empowerment ecology framework to guide the operation of Future Centers and to empower Future Center visitors to respond to the challenges facing them…

Abstract

Purpose

To present a generic empowerment ecology framework to guide the operation of Future Centers and to empower Future Center visitors to respond to the challenges facing them and develop and implement innovative solutions.

Design/methodology/approach

An in‐depth case study was conducted in Be'er Sheva PISGA Future Center in the educational sector in Israel. Visits to a further 20 Future Centers around the world and a literature review helped to generalize the key findings and develop and validate the framework further.

Findings

Although empowerment is not always explicitly discussed in Future Centers, it is an important underlying philosophy. The framework developed in this research helps to ensure empowerment issues are systematically addressed and contains four perspectives: operating principles; resources; supporters and processes. These combine to form the empowerment ecology.

Research limitations/implications

The empowerment ecology framework has been developed from observation predominantly in one Future Center. It should now be more fully tested and validated in other Future Centers.

Practical implications

This paper provides a framework to help Future Center practitioners and other future oriented working environments stakeholders to explicitly address empowerment issues.

Originality/value

This paper provides a detailed description of the operation of a regionally focused Future Center in the educational sector. The paper presents a novel empowerment ecology framework for use in facilitated user‐centered collaborative working environments, such as Future Centers.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 5 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 May 2022

Fana Rasolofo-Distler

This paper aims to discuss the impact of institutional pressures on the selection of the performance indicators in 83 balanced scorecards (BSC) used in French real estate…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the impact of institutional pressures on the selection of the performance indicators in 83 balanced scorecards (BSC) used in French real estate companies. The author studied the way in which two factors that are representative of institutional pressures in the real estate sector – namely, “ecology” and “digital innovation” – were incorporated into the BSC causal chains.

Design/methodology/approach

The author’s methodology is that of action research. To analyze the balance of indicators between short and long term, the author classified the companies according to their strategic acuity, i.e. their ability to balance an organizational vision (near vision) and an environmental one (distance vision) when choosing their performance indicators. This resulted in a company classification with three categories: emmetropic, hypermetropic and slightly myopic.

Findings

This research enabled to observe that the selected ecological indicators in BSCs derive mainly from coercive institutional pressure. Hence, in companies with fewer legal requirements in ecological matters, the selected ecological indicators are included in the BSC causal chain, in that they are used as a commercial argument with a view to improving financial performance. These results are similar to the reactionary and reputational perspectives of the sustainability business case. With regard to the incorporation of digital innovation indicators into BSCs, the author found that the companies that have the most digital innovation indicators are those that mobilize the most ecological indicators. Digital innovation indicators are part of the companies’ internal process perspective and are linked to organizational learning indicators. These results are similar to the responsible and collaborative perspectives of the sustainability business case. The author also found that the companies incorporate digital indicators into their BSCs by institutional mimicry insofar as the selected indicators are not always consistent with a strategic rationale but are chosen by copying what is done in other companies.

Research limitations/implications

The author’s research has two main limitations related to the methodology used. On the one hand, the mobilization of part-time management students to have access to companies can influence the emergence of mimetic isomorphisms. Indeed, these students follow the same training and advise the companies that welcome them according to the training they have followed. On the other hand, the author’s research stops at the development of the BSC. The author does not study the impacts or changes that occurred after the implementation of the tool. This could be the subject of future research on the appropriation and use of the BSC by the company’s actors and their impact on the optimization of global performance measurement system.

Practical implications

This study may be of interest to researchers and managers who wish to reconcile sustainable development and digital innovation in global performance management. It analyzes the impact of institutional pressures on the performance measurement system. It offers insights on how to integrate ecological indicators and digital innovation indicators into the BSC causal chains. It identifies the tensions that managers may face. It reports on practices adopted in the field by managers in action.

Social implications

This paper reveals the feasibility of measuring global performance integrating ecology and digital innovation. It responds to a preoccupation of recent years in academic research on how to reconcile corporate social responsibility and technological innovation. It shows that the companies that have the most digital innovation indicators are those that mobilize the most ecological indicators. However, it highlights the difficulties encountered by managers in the field when faced with institutional pressures.

Originality/value

The author’s reflection is in line with the literature of recent years that reconciles sustainable development and innovation. The author studied how “ecology” and “digital innovation” are incorporated into the BSC causal chains. To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is the first time this type of study has been conducted in the literature.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 July 2021

Yue Long, Lang Lu and Pan Liu

The purpose of this paper is to solve the problem of low efficiency on knowledge resources allocation in the strategic emerging industry (SEI), an incentive model of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to solve the problem of low efficiency on knowledge resources allocation in the strategic emerging industry (SEI), an incentive model of technology innovation based on knowledge ecological coupling is designed.

Design/methodology/approach

First, a principal–agent model of knowledge inputs and a knowledge ecological coupling model based on an improved Lotka–Volterra model are constructed. In addition, a numerical example about Chongqing Yongchuan industrial park, the emulation analysis and the associated discussions are conducted to analyze the equilibriums of principal–agent in different knowledge inputs. Further, the paper analyzes the evolutionary equilibrium in knowledge ecological coupling and reveals the dual adjustments of the node organization on knowledge inputs.

Findings

Thus, this paper shows that by establishing the relationships of knowledge ecological coupling based on “mutualism and commensalism,” node organization raises the level of knowledge inputs; an incentive mode of “knowledge ecological coupling relationship + technology innovation chain” is conductive to substantially improving the efficiency of knowledge resource allocation, and to stimulate the vitality of node organization for technology innovation in the strategic emerging industry (SEI).

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the extant researches in two ways. First, this paper reveals the dual adjustments of the node organizations in inputting knowledge, which broadens the vision and borders of the researches on traditional knowledge management. The methods of the traditional principal–agent model and the knowledge input/output profit model are also expanded. Second, this paper verifies that applying the mode of “knowledge ecological coupling relationship + technology innovation chain” in practice is conducive to enhancing the efficiency of the cross-organizational knowledge allocation in the strategic emerging industry (SEI).

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 26 October 2010

454

Abstract

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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