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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Byoung Kwon Choi and Hyoung Koo Moon

It is recognized that employees’ helping and voice behaviors are dimensions of organizational citizenship behavior used by supervisors to evaluate their job performance. However…

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Abstract

Purpose

It is recognized that employees’ helping and voice behaviors are dimensions of organizational citizenship behavior used by supervisors to evaluate their job performance. However, existing empirical studies of these relationships have shown inconsistent findings. From the perspective of attributional theory, the purpose of this paper is to explain when subordinates’ helping and voice behaviors are more positively related to job performance by considering supervisor-attributed prosocial and impression management motives.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 200 supervisors in South Korea, the authors tested the hypotheses with hierarchical multiple regression analyses.

Findings

Results indicate that the positive effects of helping and voice behaviors on job performance were stronger when supervisors attributed such behaviors as driven less by impression management motives related to self-interest. However, contrary to the expectations, the positive influences of helping and voice behaviors on job performance were stronger when supervisors perceived low prosocial motives.

Practical implications

Findings suggest that supervisors need to avoid making the wrong attributions with regard to their subordinates’ helping and voice behaviors during the evaluation process. In addition, subordinates need to have clear motives and demonstrate consistent behavioral stances when engaging in such behaviors.

Originality/value

Using social information theory and attribution theory, this study contributes to explain when helping and voice behaviors improve evaluations of employees’ job performances by considering supervisor-attributed motives.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 August 2020

Byoung Kwon Choi, Hyoung Koo Moon and Young Ran Joo

Based on the multiple domain perspective and self-identity theory, this study aims to investigate the effect of job applicants' volunteer experience on their attraction to…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on the multiple domain perspective and self-identity theory, this study aims to investigate the effect of job applicants' volunteer experience on their attraction to organizations that engage in corporate social responsibility (CSR). Moreover, it examines the mediating effect of the CSR work role definition in this relationship and proposes a moderated mediation model of how the effect of volunteer experience on organizational attractiveness through the CSR work role definition differs according to other- and self-oriented motives.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses were tested with a moderated mediation model using a scenario-based questionnaire with a sample of 146 undergraduate students in South Korea.

Findings

Job applicants' volunteer experience was positively related to attraction to socially responsible organizations, and the CSR work role definition mediated this relationship. The conditional indirect effect of job applicants' volunteer experience on their attraction to socially responsible organizations through the CSR work role definition was significant only for job applicants with lower other- and self-oriented motives.

Practical implications

The study findings suggest that organizations performing CSR should examine whether job applicants have experience with volunteering activities and the motives behind their participation in such activities.

Originality/value

This study contributes to a comprehensive understanding of how job applicants are attracted to organizations that perform CSR and when such attraction is significant by considering their perception of the CSR work role definition and motives for volunteering activities.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Byoung Kwon Choi and Hyoung Koo Moon

Building on trait activation theory, theory of other orientation, and self-perception theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine how employees’ perceptions of helping…

2485

Abstract

Purpose

Building on trait activation theory, theory of other orientation, and self-perception theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine how employees’ perceptions of helping efficacy and instrumentality influence the relationship between their prosocial motive and helping behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 304 supervisor-subordinate dyads in South Korea were analyzed. Hypotheses were tested using hierarchical multiple regression.

Findings

The results show that prosocial motive had a stronger positive influence on helping behavior among employees with high levels of helping efficacy. However, contrary to our expectation, prosocial motive was more positively related to helping behavior when employees had high levels of helping instrumentality.

Practical implications

Organizations need to present employees with effective, standardized work procedures to make them feel efficacy in helping others. It is also necessary for organizations to consider helping behavior an important factor in performance evaluation and to signify to employees that helping behavior will be rewarded.

Social implications

Helping behavior is critical for the effectiveness of both organizations and society at large; voluntarily helping people can enhance various kinds of performance at the societal level and can contribute to people’s welfare. Thus, it is necessary to teach people how to help others and to recognize helping behavior.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the understanding of when the influence of prosocial motive on helping is more strongly activated by incorporating employees’ perceptions of the contexts in which helping behavior operates – efficacy and instrumentality.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Young Ran Joo, Hyoung Koo Moon and Byoung Kwon Choi

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of perceived overall justice and the moderating effect of self- and other-centered motives in the relationship…

3446

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of perceived overall justice and the moderating effect of self- and other-centered motives in the relationship between organizational corporate social responsibility (CSR) and organizational attractiveness using a sample of job applicants.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses were tested using a 2-by-2 experimental design and a sample of 376 South Korean University students.

Findings

The results showed that organizational CSR positively influenced job applicants’ perceived overall justice. Moreover, it was found that perceived overall justice mediated the influence of CSR on organizational attractiveness. However, contrary to the hypotheses, the indirect effect of CSR on organizational attractiveness through perceived overall justice was significant only for job applicants who attributed self-centered motives to CSR.

Practical implications

As it was found that job applicants who attributed other-centered motives to organizational CSR had high levels of perceived overall justice regarding organizations, independent of the actual level of engagement in CSR, it is crucial that organizations show sincerity in executing CSR. In addition, small- and medium-sized organizations may not have sufficient resources for CSR, but it is especially crucial for them to focus on CSR activities that are aligned with their business, implement CSR programs consistently, and focus on CSR itself rather than on advertising in order to facilitate, among job applicants, the attribution of other-centered motives to their CSR.

Originality/value

From the perspective of overall justice and attributed motives, this study intensively explores the internal mechanism by which organizational engagement in CSR influences organizational attractiveness among job applicants. In practical terms, this study shows that it is important for organizations to consistently invest in CSR with authenticity, even when CSR activities are insubstantial and doing so may be attributed to self-centered motives. Limitations and directions for future research are discussed.

Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Hyoung Koo Moon and Byoung Kwon Choi

Researchers in the field of business ethics have posited that an organization's ethical climate can benefit for employees as well as organizations. However, most of the prior…

4305

Abstract

Purpose

Researchers in the field of business ethics have posited that an organization's ethical climate can benefit for employees as well as organizations. However, most of the prior research has been conducted at the level of the individual, not organization. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to examine how an organization's ethical climate has a positive influence on two its performance indicators – customer satisfaction and financial performance – with a perspective of organizational innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from 29 subsidiaries of a conglomerate in South Korea. Hypotheses were tested using the partial least squares (PLS).

Findings

The result showed that an organization's ethical climate was positively related to customer satisfaction as well as financial performance, and this relationship was mediated by perceived organizational innovation. Additionally, the positive influence of an ethical climate on employees’ perceived organizational innovation was mediated by their organizational commitment and the climate for innovation.

Originality/value

With a focus on innovation, the study explained how an organization's ethical climate influences customer satisfaction and financial performance. Furthermore, as was the case in studies conducted in other developed countries, the results derived from South Korea sample demonstrated that an ethical climate is critical for organizational performances in developing countries.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Eun Young Nae, Hyoung Koo Moon and Byoung Kwon Choi

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the boundary conditions in the relationship between feedback-seeking behavior (FSB) and work performance. The authors hypothesized that…

2622

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the boundary conditions in the relationship between feedback-seeking behavior (FSB) and work performance. The authors hypothesized that the positive influence of employees’ FSB on their work performance is influenced by perceived quality of feedback. The authors also expected that employees’ trust in their supervisors moderated the interaction between their FSB and perceived feedback quality.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 202 employees in South Korea. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis was performed to test the hypothesis.

Findings

The results showed that while employees’ FSB was positively related to work performance, the influence was stronger for employees who perceived they were receiving high quality of feedback from supervisors. The authors also found that the moderating effect of feedback quality on the relationship between FSB and work performance was stronger when employees had high levels of trust in their supervisors.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that if managers wish to encourage employees to achieve work goal and desirable performance levels by actively engaging in FSB, they should pay more attention to providing high quality of feedback and building trust with employees.

Originality/value

This study contributes to expand the understanding of FSB-work performance relationship by verifying the boundary conditions, which suggests the importance of examining the moderating factors in the FSB mechanism.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2013

Hyoung Koo Moon, Byoung Kwon Choi and Jae Shik Jung

The purpose of this paper is to comprehensively investigate the antecedents of expatriates' cultural intelligence (CQ) by simultaneously considering previous working experiences…

1371

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to comprehensively investigate the antecedents of expatriates' cultural intelligence (CQ) by simultaneously considering previous working experiences in one's home country prior to expatriation, the number of co‐expatriates from their home country and local employees from the host country, perception of promotion opportunities, and self‐monitoring. In addition, the paper aims to examine the moderating effects of expatriates' portion of interaction with local employee and knowledge on length of expatriation.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 165 Korean expatriates using self‐reported survey. Hypotheses were tested using multiple hierarchical regression analyses.

Findings

Hypotheses were partially supported. Expatriates' previous working experiences with foreign nationals and in an overseas department in their home country were positively related to CQ. As expected, whereas the number of co‐expatriates from home country was negatively related to CQ, the number of local employees in the host country was positively associated with CQ. Expatriates' perception of a promotion opportunity and self‐monitoring were positively related to CQ. In addition, moderating effects of expatriates' portion of interaction with local employees and knowledge on the length of their foreign assignment were found.

Originality/value

This study contributes to deepen understanding about expatriates' CQ by considering various antecedents, such as previous experiences, human resource practices, and dispositions. The authors' results provide practical implications for multinational companies.

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2013

Byoung Kwon Choi, Hyoung Koo Moon and Wook Ko

The purpose of this study is to examine how an organization's ethical climate positively relates to its financial performance by considering an organization's innovation, a…

5553

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine how an organization's ethical climate positively relates to its financial performance by considering an organization's innovation, a support for innovation and performance evaluation.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from employees and managers of 41 subsidiaries of a conglomerate in South Korea through survey questionnaires.

Findings

The results indicate that an organization's ethical climate is positively related to financial performance, and its positive relationship is mediated by an organization's innovation. The result also shows that a support for innovation has the moderating effect, such that the positive influence of an organization's ethical climate on its innovation increases when a support for innovation is high. However, this study fails to find the moderating effect of performance evaluation.

Research limitations/implications

There might be the issue of generalizability, because the sample of this study is on the sample of a conglomerate in South Korea. Future research with different types of organizations in other nations is needed.

Practical implications

This study indicates that an organization's ethical climate can be a critical predictor of its innovation as well as financial performance. In this regard, organizations should pay attention to employees' perceptions of the organization's ethical climate.

Originality/value

This study explains the mechanisms on how an organization's ethical climate is related to its financial performance, and provides implications for organizations strivings for ethics in developing countries such as South Korea.

Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Byoung Kwon Choi, Hyoung Koo Moon, Wook Ko and Kyoung Min Kim

The purpose of this paper is to test the mediating effect of organizational identification (OI) in the relationship between organizational justice and organizational citizenship…

2227

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the mediating effect of organizational identification (OI) in the relationship between organizational justice and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB), and also to examine the moderating effects of transactional and relational contracts in the relationship between OI and OCB.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from employees working for ten companies in South Korea. The participants were asked with a self-reported survey, and 284 questionnaires were used in the analyses.

Findings

Among the three types of organizational justice, the effects of distributive and interactional justice on OCB were mediated by OI. The authors also found that the positive relationship between OI and OCB was stronger for both a low level of transactional and a high level of relational contract. In addition, the moderated mediation analyses confirmed that the indirect relationships between distributive, interactional justice and OCB through OI were valid for both high and low level of transactional contract, and only for low level of relational contract.

Practical implications

To facilitate employees’ OCB, organizations have to pay adequate attention to distributive justice which is rather neglected, and also must understand what types of psychological contract employees have.

Originality/value

This study intensively explored the internal mechanism as to how the different types of organizational justice lead to OCB by identifying the mediating effect of OI and moderating roles of psychological contracts.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 31 August 2014

Seong-Gyu Jeon and Yong Jin Kim

The weapon system of The Navy is the small quantity producing system on multiple kinds. It is consisted of various equipment and the subordinate parts of those which can repair…

Abstract

The weapon system of The Navy is the small quantity producing system on multiple kinds. It is consisted of various equipment and the subordinate parts of those which can repair the damaged part. The operating procedure concerning warship's repair parts managed under these systems is as follows. Firstly, if demand of repair parts occurs from warship which is the operating unit of weapon, then the Fleet(the repair & supply support battalion) is in charge of dealing with these requests. If certain request from warship is beyond the battalion's capability, it is delivered directly to the Logistic Command. In short, the repair and supply support system of repair parts can be described as the multi-level support system. The various theoretical researches on inventory management of Navy's repair parts and simulation study that reflects reality in detail have been carried out simultaneously. However, the majority of existing research has been conducted on aircraft and tank's repairable items, in that, the studies is woefully deficient in the area concerning Navy's inventory management. For that reason, this paper firstly constructs the model of consumable items that is frequently damaged reflecting characteristics of navy's repair parts inventory management using ARENA simulation. After that, this paper is trying to propose methodology to analyze optimal inventory level of each supply unit through OptQuest, the optimization program of ARENA simulation.

Details

Journal of International Logistics and Trade, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1738-2122

Keywords

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