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1 – 10 of 45
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2002

Richard C. Morey, Beverley A. Sparks and Hugh C. Wilkins

The consumption of wine has over recent years increased in many countries with wine now often being a preferred social beverage. As consumption has increased consumers have become…

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Abstract

The consumption of wine has over recent years increased in many countries with wine now often being a preferred social beverage. As consumption has increased consumers have become more familiar with the range of wines available and are now more sophisticated in their selection of wines. The wine selection process is likely to be highly complex and may involve trading off a range of product attributes when making a purchase. This article presents the results of a research project investigating consumer decision making when selecting wines. It focuses on five key wine attributes (grape variety, price brand recognition the region of production and whether it has won any awards), and situates the decision process within possible buying contexts. Price, type of wine, the presence of a national award and the purchase context were significant predictors of the decision to purchase a wine. This study is an example of an analytical approach applied to an issue that has largely defied the use of quantitative tools.

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International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1935

In the House of Commons recently Sir Kingsley Wood, the Minister of Health, was asked by Mr. Rickards, the member for the Skipton division of the West Riding, whether “the new…

Abstract

In the House of Commons recently Sir Kingsley Wood, the Minister of Health, was asked by Mr. Rickards, the member for the Skipton division of the West Riding, whether “the new process of adding germicide to milk for destroying bacteria had been brought to his notice?; whether he would have the process tested and investigated?; and consider whether any modification of the Food and Drugs (Adulteration) Act would be required to permit of milk so treated being sold on a commercial scale?”—Sir Kingsley Wood in reply disclaimed all official knowledge of the germicide. He also pointed out that to treat milk with a germicide would be contrary to the provisions of the Preservatives Regulations, and of the Food and Drugs (Adulteration) Act. We understand “germ” to be a more or less popular term frequently and somewhat loosely used when reference in general is made to pathogenic organisms; and a germicide is a material something that kills, or is supposed to kill, germs when it comes in contact with them, or the medium in which they exist. A disinfectant is a germicide. In the simple judgment of the ordinary householder the more it smells the better it is for purposes of disinfection. When a germicide is used in cither medicine or surgery the term antiseptic is frequently employed. Familiar instances of both disinfectants and antiseptics are chloride of lime, carbolic acid, iodine, boron compounds, formalin, sulphur dioxide, or sulphites.

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British Food Journal, vol. 37 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 14 April 2010

Hugh Masters and Susanne Forrest

Mental health service user involvement in education has gained momentum and prominence over the past decade, but service user involvement in the assessment of students' practice…

Abstract

Mental health service user involvement in education has gained momentum and prominence over the past decade, but service user involvement in the assessment of students' practice remains underdeveloped. This paper reports findings from a qualitative analysis of documentary data that captured service users' feedback to mental health student nurses about their practice. Third year mental health nursing students in acute inpatient placements were required to elicit, record and reflect on the feedback that service users gave them about their practice.One hundred and eighty eight accounts of this feedback were analysed and findings are presented in terms of the methods that students used to gain feedback and the issues that emerged from this. The analysis also explored the role that students appear to play in care delivery and what aspects of their role service users most valued. The impact that the feedback had on the students' learning and practice is examined and discussed in relation to future opportunities for, and likely barriers to, continued service user involvement in assessing students' practice.

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The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

J.R. Carby‐Hall

In a previous monograph a discussion took place on stages one and part of stage two of the three stage process in an unfair dismissal action, namely the employee having to show…

Abstract

In a previous monograph a discussion took place on stages one and part of stage two of the three stage process in an unfair dismissal action, namely the employee having to show that he has been dismissed (stage one), and some of the reasons for dismissal which fall within the statutory categories, namely the employee's capability and qualifications; misconduct and redundancy (part of stage two). In this monograph an analysis is proposed on the two remaining reasons, these being the contravention of a duty imposed by an enactment and some other substantial reason. There will then follow a discussion on the test of fairness as constituting the third of the three stage process and on the remedies available when the tribunal finds that the employee has been unfairly dismissed.

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Managerial Law, vol. 33 no. 1/2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1954

THE year 1954 opened more brightly, in some respects, than most previous years. Salaries are better than they used to be, staffs are larger, and hours are shorter. But there is…

Abstract

THE year 1954 opened more brightly, in some respects, than most previous years. Salaries are better than they used to be, staffs are larger, and hours are shorter. But there is even less room for complacency or even bare satisfaction than there was forty years ago. Then, however poor was the pay and however long the hours, there was every indication that librarianship was gradually becoming recognized as a profession which in time would rank with the great professions. Principles and objectives were clear and were never lost sight of, but librarians and assistants of that day realized that the great professions were dependant, not only on principles but upon absolute mastery of technique; that no lawyer could survive who merely talked grandiloquently about the principles and objectives of his calling; that the medical man endured—and in many instances enjoyed—a severe and lengthy training in technique and practice, and that even when he became a specialist his prime need and principal qualification was absolute mastery and up to date knowledge of technique and practice in his field of specialisation. In the light of that fad a detailed study of library technique became accepted as essential, and a mass of practical and technical literature was studied and mastered by more than one generation. For examination purposes, perhaps more than for any other reason, the present generation of assistants continues that study, but there has been a change of weight. Today we hear frequently that technique is relatively unimportant and that principles and objectives are the vital essentials.

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New Library World, vol. 55 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

J.R. Carby‐Hall

Since their creation through the Industrial Training Act 1964 to hear appeals against levies, the jurisdiction of industrial tribunals has grown considerably. One aspect of this…

Abstract

Since their creation through the Industrial Training Act 1964 to hear appeals against levies, the jurisdiction of industrial tribunals has grown considerably. One aspect of this jurisdiction, unfair dismissal, is examined here. Basic principles related to the law of unfair dismissal are examined. The practice and procedure of an industrial tribunal solely in connection with unfair dismissal cases are examined in greater detail. A case study is used to illustrate the important aspects of procedure. Appendices give relevant forms and extracts from the appropriate Code of Practice.

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Managerial Law, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1962

THE improvement in the British standard of living is generally desired. Politicians have not only subscribed to that ideal but some of them have indicated the rate at which we…

Abstract

THE improvement in the British standard of living is generally desired. Politicians have not only subscribed to that ideal but some of them have indicated the rate at which we should advance. There are, however, certain trends in the country's economic life which must be reversed if we are to make any progress in that direction.

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Work Study, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2014

John H. Bickford III and Cynthia W. Rich

Common Core State Standards Initiative mandates increased readings of informational texts within English Language Arts starting in elementary school. Accurate, age-appropriate…

Abstract

Common Core State Standards Initiative mandates increased readings of informational texts within English Language Arts starting in elementary school. Accurate, age-appropriate, and engaging content is at the center of effective social studies teaching. Textbooks and children’s literature—both literary and informational—are prominent in elementary classrooms because of the esoteric nature of primary source material. Many research projects have investigated historical accuracy and representation within textbooks, but few have done so with children’s trade books. We examined children’s trade books centered on three historical figures frequently incorporated within elementary school curricula: Eleanor Roosevelt, Rosa Parks, and Helen Keller. Findings revealed various forms of historical misrepresentation and differing levels of historicity. Reporting such lacunae is important for those involved in curricular decisions. We believe children’s books, even those with historical omissions and misrepresentations, provide an unique opportunity for students to incorporate and scrutinize diverse perspectives as they actively assemble historical understandings. All secondary narratives, even historically representative children’s books, can benefit from primary source supplementation. We guide teachers interested in employing relevant and rich primary source material.

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Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1963

THE object of industry is to supply the goods and services needed by the community, with the minimum consumption of real resources. The goods and services constitute our standard…

Abstract

THE object of industry is to supply the goods and services needed by the community, with the minimum consumption of real resources. The goods and services constitute our standard of living, which we can only improve if we minimise the use of our real resources and reduce the wastage in them. Productivity is thus the ratio between what you take out in the way of goods and services and what you put in as real resources. Higher productivity is getting the same or more goods and services from less resources. That is the problem which faces us both in relation to the immediate needs of the population and in respect to the drive to increase exports and so pay for the important imports which the country so badly needs.

Details

Work Study, vol. 12 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1977

THE Reference Department of Paisley Central Library today occupies the room which was the original Public Library built in 1870 and opened to the public in April 1871. Since that…

Abstract

THE Reference Department of Paisley Central Library today occupies the room which was the original Public Library built in 1870 and opened to the public in April 1871. Since that date two extensions to the building have taken place. The first, in 1882, provided a separate room for both Reference and Lending libraries; the second, opened in 1938, provided a new Children's Department. Together with the original cost of the building, these extensions were entirely financed by Sir Peter Coats, James Coats of Auchendrane and Daniel Coats respectively. The people of Paisley indeed owe much to this one family, whose generosity was great. They not only provided the capital required but continued to donate many useful and often extremely valuable works of reference over the many years that followed. In 1975 Paisley Library was incorporated in the new Renfrew District library service.

Details

Library Review, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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