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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2016

Fredrik Bååthe, Gunnar Ahlborg Jr, Lars Edgren, Annica Lagström and Kerstin Nilsson

The purpose of this paper is to uncover paradoxes emerging from physicians’ experiences of a patient-centered and team-based ward round, in an internal medicine department.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to uncover paradoxes emerging from physicians’ experiences of a patient-centered and team-based ward round, in an internal medicine department.

Design/methodology/approach

Abductive reasoning relates empirical material to complex responsive processes theory in a dialectical process to further understandings.

Findings

This paper found the response from physicians, to a patient-centered and team-based ward round, related to whether the new demands challenged or confirmed individual physician’s professional identity. Two empirically divergent perspectives on enacting the role of physician during ward round emerged: We-perspective and I-perspective, based on where the physician’s professional identity was centered. Physicians with more of an I-perspective experienced challenges with the new round, while physicians with more of a We-perspective experienced alignment with their professional identity and embraced the new round. When identity is challenged, anxiety is aroused, and if anxiety is not catered to, then resistance is likely to follow and changes are likely to be hampered.

Practical implications

For change processes affecting physicians’ professional identity, it is important for managers and change leaders to acknowledge paradox and find a balance between new knowledge that needs to be learnt and who the physician is becoming in this new procedure.

Originality/value

This paper provides increased understanding about how physicians’ professional identity is interacting with a patient-centered ward round. It adds to the knowledge about developing health care in line with recent societal requests and with sustainable physician engagement.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Mats Eklof and Gunnar Ahlborg Jr

This paper aims to test the effects on aspects of workplace communication relevant to teamwork, and social support, in hospital units, of a dialog training (DT) intervention based…

5051

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to test the effects on aspects of workplace communication relevant to teamwork, and social support, in hospital units, of a dialog training (DT) intervention based on knowledge of key quality aspects related to interpersonal work-related communication among healthcare workers.

Design/methodology/approach

A cluster randomized controlled study conducted among approximately 300 Swedish healthcare workers employed at ten hospital units. Workplace communication was measured in the form of participative safety, trust/openness, and social support. Effects were tested at three-month and six-month follow-ups. Repeated measurements were made.

Findings

The results indicated that DT had a positive influence on participative safety and social support from managers. A positive tendency was observed for trust/openness.

Originality/value

Developing and practicing good staff communication in hospital units is an important area for interventions designed to improve job performance and health.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Christina Grill, Gunnar Ahlborg Jr, Ewa Wikström and Eva-Carin Lindgren

This paper aims to illuminate and analyse the participants’ experiences of the influences of a dialogue intervention. Cooperation and coordination in health care require planning…

1131

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to illuminate and analyse the participants’ experiences of the influences of a dialogue intervention. Cooperation and coordination in health care require planning of dialogically oriented communication to prevent stress and ill health and to promote health, well-being, learning and efficiency in the organisation.

Design/methodology/approach

An intervention method based on dialogue theory, with Socratic provocations and concrete workplace examples enhanced authenticity of conversations. A qualitative study, using qualitative content analysis, entailed interviews with 24 nurses, assistant nurses and paramedics, strategically selected from 156 intervention participants.

Findings

Two themes emerged, dialogue-learning processes and dialogue-promoting communicative actions. The first includes risk-taking to overcome resistance and fear of dialogue, expressing openly thoughts and feelings on concrete issues and taboo subjects, listening to and reflecting on one’s own and others’ perspectives and problematising norms and values. The second comprises voicing opinions, and regarding one’s own limits; requesting support and room for manoeuvre; and restraining negative emotions and comments in the interest of well-being. Findings depict strengthened awareness and readiness regarding dialogue and multiple balancing of dialogue at work.

Research limitations/implications

This study implies further observing and examining of communicative patterns during workplace dialogue.

Practical implications

A useful approach to communication development for occupational health and personnel in health care and other workplace contexts.

Originality/value

Previously, arenas have been created for dialogue, but close-process studies of dialogue in health-care work are scarce. This study provides insights into how workplace communication can develop towards dialogue.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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