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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Moyra Riseborough

The Single Regeneration Budget (SRB) is a key social‐economic regeneration instrument in the UK delivered through partnerships of cross‐ sectoral organisations with local…

Abstract

The Single Regeneration Budget (SRB) is a key social‐economic regeneration instrument in the UK delivered through partnerships of cross‐ sectoral organisations with local communities. The article discusses recent research which found that women’s needs and capabilities were largely ignored in SRB. The reasons stem from widespread “gender blindness” characterised by familiar gender‐neutral motifs which deny the salience of gender as a variable through which human life and inequality are experienced. Gender blindness was additionally supported by social processes and institutions which have emerged from shifts in public policy and political change since the 1980s. The gender blindness of the late 1990s is described as a new manifestation of discrimination and its curiousness is that it is evident in a policy context which gives high priority to combating social exclusion.

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International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

S. Mavin, P. Bryans and T. Waring

This paper argues that business and management schools continue to operate a gender blind approach (or at best gender neutral) to management education, management research…

Abstract

This paper argues that business and management schools continue to operate a gender blind approach (or at best gender neutral) to management education, management research and the development of management theory. This echoes a pattern repeated in the practice of management, which closes down and inhibits opportunities for management to be “done differently” and for organisations to be different. Reflecting on the author's experiences within two business schools and on their empirical research carried out over six years, the paper provides substantive arguments for the authors' position relating to the masculine nature of management, the place of academic women in management, the male dominated processes of management education and management research and the need to place gender on the agenda in management education. The paper concludes with a call for an “unlearning” and a “rethinking” of gender blind management education and provides some examples of how this might be achieved.

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Management Decision, vol. 42 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Sharon Mavin, Patricia Bryans and Teresa Waring

This paper argues that UK business and management schools continue to operate a gender blind approach (or at best gender neutral) to management education, research and the…

Abstract

This paper argues that UK business and management schools continue to operate a gender blind approach (or at best gender neutral) to management education, research and the development of management theory. This echoes a pattern repeated in the practice of management, which closes down and inhibits opportunities for management to be “done differently” and for organizations to be different. Our aim in this paper is to critically scrutinise and enable a consciousness raising in ourselves and our audience by highlighting what we understand as gender blindness within management, management research and education. However, the issue of whether this gender blindness results from “not seeing”, “being unaware”, “suppressing gender” or “gender defensiveness” remains problematic. We conclude with a call for an “unlearning” and a “rethinking” of gender blind management education and provide some examples of how this might be achieved.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Abstract

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Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2020

Rifat Kamasak, Mustafa Ozbilgin, Berk Kucukaltan and Meltem Yavuz

The interplay between gender and dynamic managerial capabilities is not well studied in the extant literature. This paper aims to explore how dynamic managerial…

Abstract

Purpose

The interplay between gender and dynamic managerial capabilities is not well studied in the extant literature. This paper aims to explore how dynamic managerial capabilities, as prized qualities in the job market, are framed in gendered ways and how the gendering process disadvantages female and male workers for different reasons and harms the organisations, which use the managerial capabilities approach without proofing it for gender biases.

Design/methodology/approach

An extensive literature review was conducted and a framework that offers a new gender perspective was offered.

Findings

A number of ways dynamic managerial capabilities may be proofed for gender biases and how a gender-balanced framing of dynamic managerial capabilities may be achieved are identified.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the development of a new gender perspective, which is called regendering of dynamic managerial capabilities, which frees the concept from its binary frames of gender, assumptions of gender neutrality, with a view to capture gender diversity in a way which is closer to its nature in theory and practice of dynamic managerial capabilities.

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Gender in Management: An International Journal , vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2018

Corina Sheerin and Margaret Linehan

Through an examination of the everyday organisational and social practices, this paper aims to consider gender performativity and hegemonic masculinity within front office…

Abstract

Purpose

Through an examination of the everyday organisational and social practices, this paper aims to consider gender performativity and hegemonic masculinity within front office investment management. At the core of this research is the need to understand the interactions between gender, power and patriarchy.

Design/methodology/approach

An interpretivist philosophical stance underpins the study. A theory-building approach using 19 semi-structured interviews with investment management employees based in Ireland was undertaken.

Findings

The findings highlight a sector in which gender is performed in line with sectoral expectations, which place men in positions of dominance with hegemonic masculinity inherent. The organisational structures and daily interactions are imbued with male norms, which dictate how gender is to be performed, and which places women firmly as “different” and “outsiders”. These mechanisms of inequality are further supported by men’s “blocked reflexivity”.

Practical implications

The findings of this study indicate clear evidence of a “patriarchal dividend”, which is underpinned by the maintenance of closure regimes and gender blindness particularly, among senior male gatekeepers. Such results call for policymakers to go beyond goals of numerical parity and ensure transparency and equality across all aspects of work. A holistic and multifaceted approach to addressing issues of gendered culture and the normalisation of men’s privileged relationship with power positions is needed.

Originality/value

This paper is situated within a relatively under-researched labour market space, that of investment management. The findings conceptualise gender as a social process, thus facilitating traditional assumptions about gender at work as a single entity to be challenged. The results also advance theoretical insights of misogynistic work cultures and hegemonic masculinity through the analysis of gendered behaviours within this traditionally male environment.

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Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Eva Elisabeth Wittbom

This paper aims to discuss the gendered dimensions of management control. Gender mainstreaming is a worldwide strategy for gender equality. The question raised in this…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the gendered dimensions of management control. Gender mainstreaming is a worldwide strategy for gender equality. The question raised in this paper is how a management control system functions under the pressure of mainstreaming gender into a core business.

Design/methodology/approach

The evidence stems from a case study at two Swedish Governmental public transport administrations. Interviews, observations of meetings and close reading of documents furnish this paper with data over a five-year period regarding the management control of the policy goal of a gender-equal transport system. The practice of management control for gender mainstreaming is studied by adopting sociological institutional theory and a gender perspective.

Findings

The management control system proves to hamper gender equality. In a technocratic core business, the control system fails to support gender mainstreaming. In this paper, the control of a gender-equal transport system results in a quantitative perspective on women and men instead of a qualitative gender perspective on the transport system.

Practical implications

This paper has practical implications both for accountants being involved in management control for gender mainstreaming and for all persons involved in promoting gender mainstreaming.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the scarce literature from research with a gender perspective on management control systems. Being exposed to gender mainstreaming, the gender perspective discloses dysfunctional dimensions within the management control system.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

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Book part
Publication date: 2 July 2020

Kate Fitz-Gibbon, Sandra Walklate, Jude McCulloch and JaneMaree Maher

In this opening chapter, the editors review the nature of different feminist perspectives and the impact that they have had on criminology and victimology. They will pay…

Abstract

In this opening chapter, the editors review the nature of different feminist perspectives and the impact that they have had on criminology and victimology. They will pay particular attention to the influence of diverse feminist voices in both past and present and the ongoing challenges posed by the emergence of southern criminology and the recourse to law as an avenue to securing change for women living with violence.

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Feminism, Criminology and Social Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-956-4

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Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2016

Franca Bimbi

The chapter is an auto-ethnographic account of the self-management of a chronic illness within the context of a participatory research project on Mediterranean Diet (MD)…

Abstract

Purpose

The chapter is an auto-ethnographic account of the self-management of a chronic illness within the context of a participatory research project on Mediterranean Diet (MD). A group of Italian women with type 2 diabetes is following a non-medical, personal interpretation of the Mediterranean-style diet. The research account is preceded by a critical appraisal of the scientific narratives of the MD.

Methodology/approach

Analysis of epidemiological research on MD examines some methodological aspects of gender blindness in its scientific approach. The ethnography concerns self-management of MD diet and redefinition of gender relations.

Findings

MD is analyzed as a case of transplantation of yesterday’s cultural and social capitals of the peasant classes, to today’s discourses on food considered as appropriate for affluent people suffering from satiety diseases. The ethnography highlights gender aspects of biographical work, examining in particular a “conversion” dietary model.

Research limitations

The ethnography must be amplified to include women and men from different social classes with various Mediterranean cooking habits, and family and gender patterns.

Practical implications

The chapter highlights cultural processes for women’s empowerment in self-managing type 2 diabetes.

Originality/value

This chapter may represent a seminal sociological work on chronic illness, gender and food studies in one of the “native” contexts of the Mediterranean-style diet.

Details

Gender and Food: From Production to Consumption and After
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-054-1

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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Maryam Dilmaghani and Vurain Tabvuma

The purpose of this study is to compare the gender gaps in work–life balance satisfaction across occupations. Due to data limitations, the studies of work–life balance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to compare the gender gaps in work–life balance satisfaction across occupations. Due to data limitations, the studies of work–life balance satisfaction have generally relied on researcher collected data. As a result, large-scale studies encompassing all occupations in the same social and policy context are rare. In several cycles of the Canadian General Social Survey, the respondents are directly asked about their work–life balance (WLB) satisfaction. The present paper takes advantage of this unique opportunity to compare the gender gap in WLB satisfaction across occupations in Canada.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper pools four cross-sectional datasets (N = 37,335). Multivariate regression analysis is used.

Findings

Women in management and education are found to have a lower WLB satisfaction than their male counterparts. Conversely, and rather surprisingly, a WLB satisfaction advantage is found for women in transport over males in this occupation. Further investigation shows that the female WLB advantage in transport is driven by the relatively low WLB satisfaction of males in this occupation, while the opposite is true for education.

Social implications

The findings are discussed in light of the WLB policies and their increasing gender-blindness.

Originality/value

This paper is the first large-scale study which compares the gender gap in WLB satisfaction across occupations, in a given policy context.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal , vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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