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1 – 10 of 727
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

G. Smithers, S. Finch, W. Doyle, C. Lowe, C.J. Bates, A. Prentice and P.C. Clarke

Commissioned by the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, the Department of Health and carried out by Social and Community Planning Research and MRC Dunn Nutrition Unit…

3399

Abstract

Commissioned by the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, the Department of Health and carried out by Social and Community Planning Research and MRC Dunn Nutrition Unit, the dental hospitals of the Universities of Newcastle and Birmingham and the Department of Epidemiology of the University of London, this research forms part of the National Diet and Nutrition Survey. Set up in 1992 the surveys cover representative groups of the population and examine the diet of the over‐65s in terms of actual dietary intake, habits, energy and nutrient intakes, physical measurements. Regional and socio‐economic comparisons are made.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 98 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Graham J. Treloar, Hani Gupta, Peter E.D. Love and Binh Nguyen

Residential building construction activities, whether it is new build, repair or maintenance, consumes a large amount of natural resources. This has a negative impact on the…

6015

Abstract

Residential building construction activities, whether it is new build, repair or maintenance, consumes a large amount of natural resources. This has a negative impact on the environment in the form depleting natural resources, increasing waste production and pollution. Previous research has identified the benefits of preventing or reducing material waste, mainly in terms of the limited available space for waste disposal, and escalating costs associated with landfills, waste management and disposal and their impact on a building company's profitability. There has however been little development internationally of innovative waste management strategies aimed at reducing the resource requirement of the construction process. The authors contend that embodied energy is a useful indicator of resource value. Using data provided by a regional high‐volume residential builder in the State of Victoria, Australia, this paper identifies the various types of waste that are generated from the construction of a typical standard house. It was found that in this particular case, wasted amounts of materials were less than those found previously by others for cases in capital cities (5‐10 per cent), suggesting that waste minimisation strategies are successfully being implemented. Cost and embodied energy savings from using materials with recycled content are potentially more beneficial in terms of embodied energy and resource depletion than waste minimisation strategies.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Jens Rowold and Jan Schilling

Within the framework of learning in organizations, the concept of career‐related continuous learning (CRCL) has gained increasing attention from the research community. The…

2390

Abstract

Purpose

Within the framework of learning in organizations, the concept of career‐related continuous learning (CRCL) has gained increasing attention from the research community. The purpose of the present study is to explore the combined effect of job‐ and career‐related variables on formal CRCL activities.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was based on a longitudinal framework with multiple sources of data. A total sample of n=106 call center agents provided information about job‐ and career‐related variables. Subsequently, their CRCL activities within their first 18 months in one of 11 call centers were assessed from company records.

Findings

Regression analysis revealed that job involvement predicted subsequent CRCL. Interestingly, women engaged in more CRCL activities than their male colleagues.

Research limitations/implications

In addition to objective measures of formal CRCL activities, future research should include subjective measures (i.e. survey methodology) of informal CRCL.

Practical implications

Via interventions such as active participation in decisions, and in task and work design, organization might want to foster employees' job involvement to ensure high degrees of subsequent CRCL behaviors.

Originality/value

The paper addresses a phenomenon (i.e. CRCL) that receives increasing attention from both practitioners and researchers; objective, longitudinal data provide evidence for the proposed relationship between job attitudes and CRCL and thus, causal inferences can be drawn.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

James W. Smither, Manuel London, Richard R. Reilly, Raymond Flautt, Yvette Vargas and Ivy Kucine

This paper hypothesized that ratees who share their multisource feedback with raters and ask for suggestions would improve more than other ratees. The participants were 5,335…

1958

Abstract

This paper hypothesized that ratees who share their multisource feedback with raters and ask for suggestions would improve more than other ratees. The participants were 5,335 ratees in a large, global corporation who received multisource feedback. Nine months after the initial survey, there was a follow‐up survey in which raters indicated whether the feedback recipient had shared the feedback and asked for suggestions. One year after the initial survey, there was a second multisource feedback survey. It was found that sharing feedback and asking for suggestions accounted for only a very small (albeit statistically significant) proportion of variance in improvement over time. This paper discusses factors that may affect the impact of sharing feedback and asking for suggestions following multisource feedback.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 January 2013

Regina H. Mulder

The purpose of this paper is to increase insight in the mechanisms of feedback processes by investigating what kind of feedback characteristics lead to what specific kind of…

2745

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to increase insight in the mechanisms of feedback processes by investigating what kind of feedback characteristics lead to what specific kind of informal learning activities (ILAs).

Design/methodology/approach

The 31 persons participated were recruited by the snowball method, and work in education, healthcare or profit sector. They filled out a learning log. The respondents wrote down feedback incidents that occurred and the ILA they carried out in response. A total of 367 feedback incidents led to 913 ILA. Quantitative analyses such as correlations and regression analyses are conducted.

Findings

Feedback led to ILA, especially to reflection, and communication with colleagues. There is no pattern found in the relation between outcomes. Timing aspects seem irrelevant for ILA. Feedback consisting of discussing possibilities for personal improvement leads to ILA. Precise, positive and helpful feedback leads to ILA.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the aim and design of the study, the outcomes are not generalizable and individual characteristics (e.g. motivation, attitude) were not measured. A few ILA are mentioned only a few times.

Practical implications

Feedback that consists of discussing possibilities for personal improvement can be used to increase ILA. Feedback can be used to increase reflection and communication at work. Creating a work culture that fosters learning from feedback is important. The quality of feedback providing competences is important.

Originality/value

This paper gives in-depth insight into the relation between specific characteristics of feedback and the ILA. It also assesses to what ILA a specific feedback incident (directly) leads.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 October 2022

Jill E. Ellingson and Kristina B. Tirol-Carmody

Self-report questionnaires are the predominant method used in human resource management (HRM) research to assess employees’ work-related psychological constructs (e.g., processes

Abstract

Self-report questionnaires are the predominant method used in human resource management (HRM) research to assess employees’ work-related psychological constructs (e.g., processes, states, and attributes). However, this method is associated with significant shortcomings, including the introduction of self-serving bias and common method variance when used exclusively. In this chapter, the authors challenge the assumption that individuals themselves are the only accurate source of the self-focused information collected in HRM research. Instead, the authors propose that other-ratings – ratings of a target individual that are provided by a workplace observer, such as a coworker, supervisor, or subordinate – can accurately assess commonly measured work-related psychological constructs. The authors begin by explaining the advantages of other-ratings for HRM research and practice, reviewing the history of other-ratings and how they emerged in the personality and person-perception literature, and outlining how they have been used in HRM research to date. Then, the authors build upon Funder’s (1995) realistic accuracy model to develop a theoretical argument detailing why workplace others should be able to accurately judge how another employee thinks and feels about work. Next, the authors highlight existing evidence in the literature on the accuracy of other-ratings and present the results of a preliminary meta-analysis on the ability of other-ratings to predict self-ratings of work-related psychological constructs. Finally, the authors discuss potential moderators of other-rating accuracy and reflect on a number of practical considerations for researchers looking to use other-ratings in their own work. The authors intend for this chapter to meaningfully contribute to the larger conversation on HRM research methods. Other-ratings are a simple, yet powerful, addition to the methodological toolkit of HRM researchers that can increase flexibility in research design and improve the overall quality of research.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-046-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Gary J. Greguras, John M. Ford and Stéphane Brutus

Although research on multisource ratings indicates that different rater sources provide different information, little research has investigated how ratees attend to such…

2103

Abstract

Although research on multisource ratings indicates that different rater sources provide different information, little research has investigated how ratees attend to such information. Understanding how ratees attend to feedback information from different rater sources is important because such attention likely impacts subsequent behavior. Using a policy‐capturing design, managers (n = 213) completed scenarios in which supervisor, peer, and subordinate ratings were varied across different performance dimensions. Results indicated that ratees attended to all three rater sources, with supervisor ratings being attended to more than peer or subordinate ratings. Further, results indicated a significant interaction between rater source and performance dimension such that some rater sources were attended to more, for certain dimensions, than for others.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2009

Kathleen Lynne Lane, Allison L. Bruhn, Mary E. Crnobori and Anne Louise Sewell

Functional assessment-based interventions are a tertiary support that have been incorporated in many three-tiered models of prevention to support students who do not respond to…

Abstract

Functional assessment-based interventions are a tertiary support that have been incorporated in many three-tiered models of prevention to support students who do not respond to more global prevention efforts. Although endorsed by host of reputable organizations (e.g., National Association of School Psychologists) and mandated in Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA, 1997, 2004), concerns have been raised that this mandate may not be warranted if functional assessment-based interventions do not meet minimum criteria to establish this as an evidence-based practice. One issue contributing to this concern is variability in the functional assessment process. John Umbreit and colleagues (2007) have attempted to address this concern by introducing a systematic approach that includes (a) a Function Matrix to analyze functional assessment data and identify the hypothesized function(s) of the target behavior and (b) a Function-Based Intervention Decision Model to guide intervention planning. In this chapter, we applied the core quality indicators for single-case research developed by Horner, Carr, Halle, McGee, Odom, and Wolery (2005) to studies conducted using this practice to determine the extent to which this systematic approach to functional assessment-based interventions met the standards for evidence-based practices for use in educational settings across the K-12 continuum for students with or at-risk for high incidence disabilities. If this practice is deemed to meet criteria, then this systematic approach may be particularly useful in meeting the mandate established in IDEA. Results suggest that it may be appropriate to establish this systematic method as a promising practice.

Details

Policy and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-311-8

Article
Publication date: 27 March 2007

Dirk van Dierendonck, Clare Haynes, Carol Borrill and Chris Stride

To investigate the influence of participating in an upward feedback program on leadership behaviour, both as indicated be self‐ratings and subordinates' ratings.

6010

Abstract

Purpose

To investigate the influence of participating in an upward feedback program on leadership behaviour, both as indicated be self‐ratings and subordinates' ratings.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design consisted of two measurement points within six months. The program included managers receiving an upward feedback report and a short workshop to facilitate interpretation. A sample of 45 managers and 308 staff members of a community health care organization took part.

Findings

The study showed three results. First, managers lack insight into the real impact of their behavior. Second, only a small positive effect was found of the upward feedback program on the leadership behaviour as rated by their staff in terms of valuing diversity. Third, the managers' self‐ratings of Presenting feedback, Fairness and Integrity & respect decreased between Time 1 and Time 2.

Originality/value

The study points towards the need for HRM professionals to carefully implement upward feedback programs in order to have a real impact on the development of managers.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2018

Rebecca Mosson, Henna Hasson, Ulrica von Thiele Schwarz and Anne Richter

A common component in leadership interventions is the provision of feedback on leadership behaviors. The assumption is that, when there is a discrepancy in this feedback between…

Abstract

Purpose

A common component in leadership interventions is the provision of feedback on leadership behaviors. The assumption is that, when there is a discrepancy in this feedback between managers’ and others’ ratings of leadership, this will increase managers’ self-awareness and motivate them to close this gap. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how agreement between managers and their subordinates changes over time as a result of a leadership intervention.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaire data were collected from line managers (N=18) and their subordinates (N=640) at pre-intervention, post-intervention and at a six-month follow-up. The managers participated in a leadership intervention that aimed to increase their knowledge and skills related to the leadership behaviors described in the Full-Range Leadership Model. Inter-rater agreement and reliability were calculated to justify aggregating the subordinates’ ratings. The managers and their subordinates were grouped according to three agreement categories: in agreement, managers’ over-rating and managers’ under-rating based on the managers’ views of their leader behaviors in relation to their subordinates’.

Findings

Manager-subordinate agreement on the managers’ leadership increased between pre-intervention and post-intervention but then decreased at the six-month follow-up (17, 61 and 44 percent, respectively). Most managers (n=15) changed agreement categories over time, and only three managers remained in the same agreement category throughout. The subordinates’ mean leadership ratings changed more than the managers’ mean ratings.

Originality/value

This is the first study to explore how manager-subordinate agreement changes when managers participate in a leadership intervention in a health care context. It shows that an intervention that includes upward feedback, by which managers self-rating of their leadership is compared with their subordinates’ ratings, can be an effective way to increase agreement.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

1 – 10 of 727