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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Hye-Jin Paek, Elizabeth Taylor Quilliam, Sookyong Kim, Lorraine J. Weatherspoon, Nora J. Rifon and Mira Lee

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the content of food advergames and the nutritional quality of foods promoted in those advergames with the presence of child visitors…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the content of food advergames and the nutritional quality of foods promoted in those advergames with the presence of child visitors.

Design/methodology/approach

This study integrates three different sources of data, first, characteristics of the audience from internet audience measurement metrics; second, an analysis of food advergame content; and third, an analysis of the dietary quality of the foods in advergames.

Findings

The results show that 83.2 percent of the total 143 advergames are sponsored by CFBAI participating companies and 79.5 percent of the total 44 advergames reaching children are sponsored by those companies. About 87 percent of the advergames reaching children do not include age limit specification. By contrast, about 71 percent of the advergames reaching children include ad breaks and about half of the advergames reaching children include healthy lifestyle information. Compared to the total, advergames reaching children seem to have a higher level of brand integration. Moreover, most foods that the advergames promote are classified as unhealthy. Finally, the results show that ad breaks and number of brand identifiers are the two significant predictors of food advergames with child unique visitors.

Originality/value

Despite the increased attention to and scrutiny of innovative and interactive food marketing targeting children, little is known about the extent to which such techniques actually reach children, nor about the content and nutritional quality of foods they promote. This study attempts to fill in the gap by focussing on food advergames.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Elizabeth Taylor Quilliam

The purpose of this paper is to examine the brand extension tactics of food marketers, considering the implications in view of public health concerns related to obesity.

2166

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the brand extension tactics of food marketers, considering the implications in view of public health concerns related to obesity.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides examples of food marketers that have introduced and promoted healthy menu or product options and examples of product line extensions that are based on larger size as the differentiating attribute.

Findings

The paper finds that brand extensions that are based solely on introducing larger sizes may meet consumer needs and benefit organizations in the short term, but at the risk of diluting brand equity and compromising society's long‐term health goals.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that food marketers should consider long‐term brand equity issues and societal needs as well as short‐term corporate goals and immediate consumer needs when extending their brands.

Originality/value

The paper provides guidance for food marketers, identifying the potential shortcomings in applying the marketing concept to brand extension without consideration of broader societal needs.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Elizabeth Taylor Quilliam

The purpose of this paper is to explore how retail organizations serve heirs attempting to settle estates, suggesting that companies providing minimal customer service risk…

813

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how retail organizations serve heirs attempting to settle estates, suggesting that companies providing minimal customer service risk driving away future business, while those companies that seek solutions to ease the estate settlement process can acquire new customer relationships from heirs and beneficiaries.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides examples of companies that adhere to strict rules, minimal service, or emphasis on cost reduction, comparing them to companies with more flexible and compassionate approaches to estate settlement.

Findings

An approach to customer service centered on meeting customer needs can enhance an organization's reputation. By contrast, those reliant on rigid policies risk losing long‐term business opportunities.

Practical implications

Companies can gain new customer relationships by improving the way they handle estate claims and provide service to executors, administrators, heirs, and beneficiaries. Financial services companies in particular stand to acquire new customer relationships from the forecasted large generational wealth transfer.

Originality/value

The paper provides guidance for improving customer service when settling estates, and argues that companies that do not seek positive ways to ease the difficulties in dealing with financial matters at death ignore the basic directives of a marketing perspective.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 February 2019

Mira Lee, Jieun Lee and Elizabeth Quilliam

This study examined both American and Korean consumers’ motivation to share marketer-generated content (MGC) on Facebook and how these motives are related to the frequency of…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study examined both American and Korean consumers’ motivation to share marketer-generated content (MGC) on Facebook and how these motives are related to the frequency of various types of sharing activities and the frequency of sharing various types of MGC.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted in the US and Korea.

Findings

The findings demonstrated that both American and Korean consumers share MGC for several reasons: liking/helping the brand, self-presentation/social interaction, economic rewards, and entertainment. In addition to these four motivations, Korean consumers also share MGC with others to offer information that may be of use to them. These different types of motivations were associated with the frequency of sharing MGC directly from Facebook brand pages, of re-sharing what Facebook friends shared first, of adding comments when sharing, and of sharing different types of MGC differently. We found similarities and differences in the patterns of these relationships between the US and Korea.

Originality/value

Although many studies on electronic word of mouth (eWOM) have examined consumers’ motivations for providing consumer-generated content, research on consumer motivations to forward marketer-generated content is scarce. Additionally, earlier work examined the influences of motivation on sharing in general and on a certain type of MGC. Our findings that focused on various types of motivations to share MGC, and their influences on various types of MGC and specific types of sharing activities can provide a more complete picture than what was previously available in the eWOM literature. Further, by comparing American consumers’ motivations to share MGC on SNSs and their influences on sharing activities with those of Korean consumers, this study contributes to building a body of cross-cultural studies on consumer sharing of MGC.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2020

Mhamed Biygautane, Evelyn Micelotta, Claudia Gabbioneta and Giulia Cappellaro

Research on institutional logics has missed the opportunity to understand how and why societies may fundamentally differ in their material and symbolic systems. In this chapter…

Abstract

Research on institutional logics has missed the opportunity to understand how and why societies may fundamentally differ in their material and symbolic systems. In this chapter, the authors offer a qualitative examination of the implementation of infrastructure public–private partnership (PPP) projects in the Arab state of Qatar. The authors illustrate how the macrofoundations of Qatari society are rooted in the notion of tribe, an inter-institutional system under which the intertwined institutional orders of the state, the market, and the family have historically developed and operated. Their study sheds light on how these macrofoundations shape the processes and mechanisms that underpin the resistance to the introduction of innovative organizational forms. The chapter makes two contributions. First, it identifies how “foreign” organizational forms rooted in Western institutional orders trigger adverse reactions from societies characterized by different institutional orders. Second, it demonstrates the challenge of implementing PPPs in an institutional context that is unfavorable to them and where actors seek to preserve the supremacy of the extant inter-institutional system.

Details

Macrofoundations: Exploring the Institutionally Situated Nature of Activity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-160-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1906

THE first of the Islington Public Libraries, opened on September 21st, has proved a phenomenal success, and, at the same time, has thrown an interesting light on several modern…

Abstract

THE first of the Islington Public Libraries, opened on September 21st, has proved a phenomenal success, and, at the same time, has thrown an interesting light on several modern theories in librarianship. It is, as our readers know, the fust of a system of five libraries, towards the erection of which Dr. Carnegie has given £40,000. The building itself is, as many librarians had an opportunity of judging at the “private view” described in our last number, of an exceedingly well‐lighted and attractive character. The arrangement and accommodation provided present several novel features. On the ground floor, opening from the Central Hall, is the Children's Lending Library and Reading Room. This is stocked with about 3,000 volumes for lending purposes, including French and German juvenile literature, and the reading room portion has seating accommodation for about a hundred children. A representative selection of children's magazines are displayed here, and there are special study‐tables for girls and boys equipped with suitable reference collections. A feature of this room is a striking dado of pictures illustrating scenes from English history, which goes far to make the room interesting and attractive.

Details

New Library World, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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