Search results

1 – 10 of 525
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

David Rae

The purpose of this paper is to explore the roles of peripherality and centrality in relation to entrepreneurial learning and development. Peripherality has previously…

Downloads
1385

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the roles of peripherality and centrality in relation to entrepreneurial learning and development. Peripherality has previously been considered from a mainly geographical perspective as being remote, loosely connected and marginal. A broader conception of the topic is addressed, asking: in what ways is peripherality relevant to entrepreneurial learning? How can centre-peripheral connectivity enhance this? What are the implications for communities, learners and educators?

Design/methodology/approach

Discourses of entrepreneurship development relating to policy, economics, geography and culture favour the concept of centres, which attract attention, resources, activities and people. Whilst peripherality is an enduring topic of interest in regional studies, it is widened through using the conceptualisation of legitimate peripheral participation in social learning as a methodological lens for the study. A case study of the technology sector in Cape Breton, Canada is included to illustrate peripheral entrepreneurship.

Findings

The paper suggests ways in which peripheral-central relationships can be a positive factor in entrepreneurial learning. It suggests that rebalancing the bidirectional “flow” of knowledge, talent and resources between centres and peripheries can enhance the value of peripheral entrepreneurship, learning and innovation.

Social implications

The paper connects with prior work on community economic development, offering observations for entrepreneurial learning and development of knowledge-intensive businesses in peripheral areas. Boundary-spanning leadership and skills are required to facilitate peripheral-central interaction and entrepreneurship.

Originality/value

Peripherality is defined more widely than in prior work, suggesting peripheral learning is part of the fundamental human experience and offers new insights, innovations and opportunities which can create shared value. A conceptual framework for peripheral-central entrepreneurial learning is proposed, which may assist in rebalancing central-peripheral value creation, innovation and regeneration.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 August 2020

Helle Neergaard, William B. Gartner, Ulla Hytti, Diamanto Politis and David Rae

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 November 2013

David Rae and Naomi Ruth Woodier-Harris

Enterprise and entrepreneurship education (EEE) is seen as a major contributor to economic growth and development in the post-2008 environment we term the “New Era”. The…

Downloads
3003

Abstract

Purpose

Enterprise and entrepreneurship education (EEE) is seen as a major contributor to economic growth and development in the post-2008 environment we term the “New Era”. The role of EEE in enabling graduates to develop entrepreneurial intentions and career plans is therefore of major importance. The paper explores how EEE can influence postgraduate entrepreneurship and career initiation in the context of the New Era economy at an international level.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores the learning experiences of a group of 60 postgraduate international students who completed an Entrepreneurship programme at the University of Lincoln which included the development of personal learning narratives and career plans. The students were exposed to the opportunity-centred entrepreneurship approach and the “Entrepreneurial Effectiveness” model in the QAA (2012) guidelines. Their narratives were analysed to assess: prior career intentions, proposed career intentions resulting from the EEE programme, application of learning arising from the EEE programme and a survey of students was used to validate the narratives

Findings

EEE has a wider influence on personal development and career planning than simply the intention to create new ventures. The paper builds on a prior study of international postgraduate students’ orientation to entrepreneurship education in their expectations of the UK higher education, which confirmed that career development is a major motivator for international study in the UK (Rae and Woodier-Harris, 2012). The paper contributes new understanding of the relationships between EEE and graduate career intentions, especially at PG and international levels. The paper explores personal growth, confidence and identity development, formation of new career intentions and the application of learning. The international dimension is considerable and this is discussed.

Practical implications

The paper has implications for the marketing, design and delivery of EEE at international and HE institutional levels, as well as for the practices of educators in designing, validating and delivering programmes for entrepreneurial career development, at national and international levels.

Originality/value

The paper contributes new understanding to the role of EEE in postgraduate career initiation at international level in a period of significant and complex economic transformation.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 55 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 July 2021

Kingsley Obi Omeihe, Amon Simba, David Rae, Veronika Gustafsson and Mohammad Saud Khan

The purpose of this article is to develop new insights into the interplay between trust, indigenous institutions and weak/dysfunctional formal institutions using the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to develop new insights into the interplay between trust, indigenous institutions and weak/dysfunctional formal institutions using the Nigerian context – a developing country in Western Africa. It advances new understanding on how Nigerian entrepreneurs trust in their indigenous institutions such as family ties, kinship, chieftaincy, religion, cooperatives and trade associations to resolve disputes arising from their exporting activities as opposed to dormant formal institutions in their country.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory study adopts an interpretive research paradigm, and it utilises a case study strategy. Data collected through observations, archival records and qualitative conversations with 36 exporting Nigerian small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) is analysed by utilising a combination of within and cross-case analysis techniques. Doing so enabled an in-depth study of the methods their owner-managers use in order to take advantage of the relationships they established through their long-standing cultural institutions in the place of weak formal institutions in their country.

Findings

Indigenous institutions have evolved to replace formalised institutions within the business environment in Nigeria. They have developed to become an alternative and trusted arbiter for solving SMEs' export issues because of weak/dysfunctional formal institutions in the Western African country. The owner-managers of exporting SMEs perceive formal institutions as representing a fragmented system that does not benefit their export businesses.

Practical implications

The findings demonstrate that there is need for policymakers to consider the role of informal institutions in the Nigerian context. Such an approach is essential given the economic importance and increasing number of SMEs that trade and export their goods through informal structures in Nigeria.

Originality/value

The study indicates that it is not just the void or absence of institutions that exist in a developing country such as Nigeria, but weak/dysfunctional formal institutions have been replaced by culturally embedded informal institutions. Thus, the study provides a new theoretical avenue depicting the concept of trusting in indigenous institutions.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

David Rae and Mary Carswell

Summarises the conclusions from research which explores how people learn to start and grow high performing businesses. Seeks to understand better the ways in which…

Downloads
5669

Abstract

Summarises the conclusions from research which explores how people learn to start and grow high performing businesses. Seeks to understand better the ways in which individuals learn to act entrepreneurially and also suggests how this understanding might influence the design of more effective learning experiences. Proposes a conceptual model of entrepreneurial learning, and assesses its implications for designing entrepreneurship education and development programmes. Findings indicate that there would be benefits from designing development programmes for current and aspirant business owners with a greater emphasis on personal development, based upon the entrepreneurial learning model proposed in the article.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 42 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

David Rae, Lynn Martin, Valerie Antcliff and Paul Hannon

This article aims to report the results of a complete survey of enterprise education in all higher education institutions (HEIs) in England, undertaken in 2010 by the…

Downloads
4995

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to report the results of a complete survey of enterprise education in all higher education institutions (HEIs) in England, undertaken in 2010 by the Institute for Small Business & Entrepreneurship (ISBE) on behalf of the National Council for Graduate Entrepreneurship (NCGE). The survey builds on prior work undertaken by the NCGE in England in 2006 and in 2007.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey aimed to establish a complete picture of curricular and extra‐curricular enterprise and entrepreneurship education. The survey uses a similar structure to the previous survey, enabling comparison to be made with enterprise provision over the 2006‐2010 period, as well as with the 2008 European survey of entrepreneurship in HE.

Findings

The results provide a stock‐take of enterprise education provision in participating HEIs and highlight the connections in institutional strategies between enterprise education, incubation/new venture support, graduate employability, innovation and academic enterprise. The paper reveals “hotspots” and gaps in enterprise provision and offers “benchmarks” for the sector.

Research limitations/implications

The article offers a summary of the implications for the future development and sustainability of enterprise education in HE, in relation to policy, funding and other changes in the sector. It also considers these issues in relation to recommendations from professional educators and government policy for future development of enterprise in HE and comments on the policy impact of this work.

Originality/value

The timing of the survey, in May‐July 2010, was important as it reflected the end of a period of over ten years of sustained investment in enterprise in higher education by the previous Labour government in the UK, through a range of funding initiatives. As major public expenditure reductions in support for HE and enterprise activity followed, this represented the “high water mark” of publicly funded enterprise activity in the HE sector, and raised the question of how enterprise education and support activities would become sustainable for the future. The report analyses existing provision, assesses its development over the 2006‐2010 period, and provides conclusions and recommendations covering future policy, development, resourcing, and sustainability of enterprise and entrepreneurship provision in higher education.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 29 April 2014

David Rae

Downloads
89

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

David Rae

Downloads
120

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

David Rae and Mary Carswell

This paper summarises the conclusions from research which explores how people learn entrepreneurial behaviour. Although learning can be said to have a critical role in…

Downloads
4751

Abstract

This paper summarises the conclusions from research which explores how people learn entrepreneurial behaviour. Although learning can be said to have a critical role in entrepreneurial achievement, the relationship is not well understood and, given the growing public policy emphasis which aims to stimulate entrepreneurship through formal education, there is a need for a greater understanding of how entrepreneurial capabilities are developed through life and work. The primary research method is through life story interviews with people who have demonstrated entrepreneurial attainment in running business ventures. In‐depth interviews explored their stories of the learning they experienced during their careers and business ventures. From the interpretation and analysis of these narratives, a number of significant themes emerge which suggest how the respondents made sense of their experiences and developed their entrepreneurial capabilities. From these themes, a conceptual model which relates the development of entrepreneurial learning to entrepreneurial achievement is proposed.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

David Rae

The purpose of this article is to explore the integrated processes of action learning, entrepreneurial learning and new venture creation by students and graduates in the…

Downloads
1911

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to explore the integrated processes of action learning, entrepreneurial learning and new venture creation by students and graduates in the creative industries by addressing two questions: How do action learning and entrepreneurial learning connect with new venture creation in the context of the creative industries? How does learning influence the types of creative enterprises developed by students?

Design/methodology/approach

The article is based around the case of the Student Placements for Entrepreneurs in Education (SPEED) project which ran in 13 higher education institutes (HEIs) in the UK between 2006 and 2008. This provided an innovative, action‐learning based route, enabling students to create new business ventures as self‐started work experience. The article uses the case to develop theoretical perspectives on creative entrepreneurship and action learning.

Findings

The article draws lessons from the experience of the SPEED programme as an innovative multi‐HEI project, and develops a conceptual model of creative entrepreneurship with illustrative cases. Transferable insights and a model of entrepreneurial action learning illustrate connections between venture formation and “pull” learning.

Practical implications

It is increasingly clear that graduate self‐employment and entrepreneurship must make an essential contribution to educational and economic development in the post‐recessionary economic era, but this is problematic, especially in the creative industries. Recommendations for development based on these models and practices are proposed for educators and policy‐makers.

Originality/value

The article connects action learning with theories of new venture creation and entrepreneurial learning. It develops critical insights and proposes conceptual models of creative enterprise and “pull” learning in venture creation.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

1 – 10 of 525