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Book part
Publication date: 23 June 2017

David Grayson

Abstract

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Take Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-292-3

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2010

David Grayson

1041

Abstract

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Strategic HR Review, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 23 June 2017

David Grayson

Abstract

Details

Take Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-292-3

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Petya Koleva and Muhammad Azam Roomi

The authors are reviewing Social Intrapreneurism and All That Jazz: How business innovators are helping to build a more sustainable world – the last book of the scholarly team…

401

Abstract

Purpose

The authors are reviewing Social Intrapreneurism and All That Jazz: How business innovators are helping to build a more sustainable world – the last book of the scholarly team David Grayson, Melody McLaren and Heiko Spitzeck issued in March 2014 that aims to demonstrate how business can become an active participant in building a sustainable future by utilizing its capacity and resources.

Design/methodology/approach

By reviewing their book in perspective through the literature, the authors discuss its potential and significance for academic and business society.

Findings

By doing so, the book was identified as a quite beneficial and a valuable source of information for business students with interest in corporate social responsibility and sustainability, individuals having career aspirations in the field of social intrapreneurship, and managers aiming to introduce social intrapreneurism in their organisations.

Originality/value

The paper adds some further insights into the topic of social intrapreneurship and the relevance of this practice to well-known and established concepts focused on the relationship between business and society.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

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Content available
Book part
Publication date: 23 June 2017

David Grayson

Abstract

Details

Take Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-292-3

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1993

David Grayson

It is estimated that by the year 2000, 40 per cent of all the UKworkforce will require first degree level of education as a minimum.Examines the role of Corporate Community…

1170

Abstract

It is estimated that by the year 2000, 40 per cent of all the UK workforce will require first degree level of education as a minimum. Examines the role of Corporate Community Involvement (CCI), a strategic management tool, and highlights several case examples.

Details

Management Development Review, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0962-2519

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 5 March 2021

Michael Grace, Alister J. Scott, Jonathan P. Sadler, David G. Proverbs and Nick Grayson

Globally, urban planners and decision makers are pursuing place-based initiatives to develop and enhance urban infrastructure to optimise city performance, competitiveness and…

Abstract

Globally, urban planners and decision makers are pursuing place-based initiatives to develop and enhance urban infrastructure to optimise city performance, competitiveness and sustainability credentials. New discourses associated with big data, Building Information Modelling, SMART cities, green and biophilic thinking inform research, policy and practice agendas to varying extents. However, these discourses remain relatively isolated as much city planning is still pursued within traditional sectoral silos hindering integration. This research explores new conceptual ground at the Smart – Natural City interface within a safe interdisciplinary opportunity space. Using the city of Birmingham UK as a case study, a methodology was developed championing co-design, integration and social learning to develop a conceptual framework to navigate the challenges and opportunities at the Smart-Natural city interface. An innovation workshop and supplementary interviews drew upon the insights and experiences of 25 experts leading to the identification of five key spaces for the conceptualisation and delivery at the Smart-Natural city interface. At the core is the space for connectivity; surrounded by spaces for visioning, place-making, citizen-led participatorylearning and monitoring.The framework provides a starting point for improved discussions, understandings and negotiations to cover all components of this particular interface. Our results show the importance of using all spaces within shared narratives; moving towards ‘silver-green’ and living infrastructure and developing data in response to identified priorities. Whilst the need for vision has dominated traditional urban planning discourses we have identified the need for improved connectivity as a prerequisite. The use of all 5 characteristics collectively takes forward the literature on socio-ecological-technological relationships and heralds significant potential to inform and improve city governance frameworks, including the benefits of a transferable deliberative and co-design method that generates ownership with a real stake in the outcomes.

Details

Emerald Open Research, vol. 1 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-3952

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 8 January 2021

Victoria Hurth

This chapter is about helping you provide a solid platform for your organisation to engage with impact, by shining a light on what sits behind the decisions you make. This chapter…

Abstract

This chapter is about helping you provide a solid platform for your organisation to engage with impact, by shining a light on what sits behind the decisions you make. This chapter will firstly set out why focussing on societal impact, whilst historically relevant, is really not a natural thing for today's organisations – in a sense, it goes against everything we have told ourselves about business for the past number of decades. At the same time, uniting the energy of an organisation to drive positive wellbeing impact is where the heart of the current revolution to address our multifaceted sustainability crises lies. It is a challenge we must rise to.

Many useful frameworks of sustainability/corporate responsibility maturity exist that can help us think about impact (e.g., Schaltegger, Hansen, & Lüdeke-Freund, 2015; Baumgartner & Ebner, 2010; Ainsbury & Grayson, 2014). This chapter extends this by delving deeper into the underlying economic mental models that structure existing organisational decision-making logics regarding impact. It outlines three archetypes of impact logic and the level of impact you would expect to be able to achieve if you operate from each one. All three sit within a ‘capitalist’ approach. Two of them are tightly bounded with neo-classical economic assumptions that have dominated business, the third marks a seismic break with these assumptions. In clarifying these archetypes, this chapter sets a trajectory that leaders can follow if they want to move towards delivering greater impact. The leadership lesson is that when it comes to delivering impact, if you want to go far, you have to go deep.

Business enterprises…are organs of society. They do not exist for their own sake, but to fulfil a specific social purpose and to satisfy a specific need of a society, a community or individuals.

Drucker (1974, p. 39).

Business enterprises…are organs of society. They do not exist for their own sake, but to fulfil a specific social purpose and to satisfy a specific need of a society, a community or individuals.

Details

Generation Impact
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-929-9

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

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Take Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-292-3

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 23 June 2017

David Grayson

Abstract

Details

Take Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-292-3

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