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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1981

VINE is produced at least four times a year with the object of providing up‐to‐date news of work being done in the automation of library house‐keeping processes…

Abstract

VINE is produced at least four times a year with the object of providing up‐to‐date news of work being done in the automation of library house‐keeping processes, principally in the UK. It is edited and substantially written by the Information Officer for Library Automation based in Southampton University Library and supported by a grant from the British Library Research and Development Department. Copyright for VINE articles rests with the British Library Board, but opinions expressed in VINE do not necessarily reflect the news and policies of the British Library. The subscription for VINE in 1981 will be £20 for UK subscribers and £23 for overseas subscribers — the subscription year runs from January to December and VINE is available in either paper or microfiche format.

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VINE, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1981

VINE is produced at least four times a year with the object of providing up‐to‐date news of work being done in the automation of library house‐keeping processes…

Abstract

VINE is produced at least four times a year with the object of providing up‐to‐date news of work being done in the automation of library house‐keeping processes, principally in the UK. It is edited and substantially written by the Information Officer for Library Automation based in Southampton University Library and supported by a grant from the British Library Research and Development Department. Copyright for VINE articles rests with the British Library Board, but opinions expressed in VINE do not necessarily reflect the news and policies of the British Library. The subscription for VINE in 1981 will be £20 for UK subscribers and £23 for overseas subscribers — the subscription year runs from January to December and VINE is available in either paper or microfiche format.

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VINE, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1976

VINE is a Very Informal Newsletter produced three times a year by the Information Officer for Library Automation and financed by the British Library Research & Development…

Abstract

VINE is a Very Informal Newsletter produced three times a year by the Information Officer for Library Automation and financed by the British Library Research & Development Department. It is issued free of charge on request to interested librarians, systems staff and library college lecturers. VINE'S objective is to provice an up‐to‐date picture of work being done in U.K. library automation which has not been reported elsewhere.

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VINE, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1979

VINE is produced at least four times a year with the object of providing up‐to‐date news of work being done in the automation of library housekeeping processes…

Abstract

VINE is produced at least four times a year with the object of providing up‐to‐date news of work being done in the automation of library housekeeping processes, principally in the UK. It is edited and substantially written by Tony McSean, Information Officer for Library Automation based in Southampton University Library and supported by a grant from the British Library Research and Development Department. Copyright for VINE articles rests with the British Library Board, but opinions expressed in VINE do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of the British Library. The subscription to VINE is £10 per year and the subscription period runs from January to December.

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VINE, vol. 9 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1980

VINE is produced at least four times a year with the object of providing up‐to‐date news of work being done in the automation of library housekeeping processes…

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Abstract

VINE is produced at least four times a year with the object of providing up‐to‐date news of work being done in the automation of library housekeeping processes, principally in the UK. It is edited and substantially written by the Information Officer for Library Automation based in Southampton University Library and supported by a grant from the British Library Research and Development Department. Copyright for VINE articles rests with the British Library Board, but opinions expressed in VINE do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of the British Library. The subscription for 1981 for VINE is £20 for UK subscribers and £23 for overseas subscribers — subscription year runs from January to December.

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VINE, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1981

JAMES FREEMAN

As computers have become more pervasive it is also clear that they have demanded new standards of attention from us and given rise to radically different training needs…

Abstract

As computers have become more pervasive it is also clear that they have demanded new standards of attention from us and given rise to radically different training needs. Nowhere is this more evident than in the area of data input: data demanded for computer analysis is now greater than ever before. At the same time, there has been a growing requirement for data of high quality and precision. Unfortunately, the quality now being sought is often well beyond the capability of the average (unaided) human operator. A relatively new piece of equipment overcomes many of the problems associated with data input by effectively recording data where they are generated. In fact, PORTABLE DATA TERMINALS (or hand held recorders) are just another example of a computer function being transferred from the hands of the specialist to those of the user. Of course, this is highly desirable as long as the user is properly trained to operate the new equipment. Unfortunately, as we have seen in so many related areas of technology, this does not always occur. The result is that standards do not improve, and may actually worsen. Hence, it is critical for all concerned that training in the use of portable terminals should be properly understood. Before we analyse training needs in 3 below, we first examine how terminals are currently being used (in 1) and comment on some of the useful ancillary equipment (in 2).

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Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 13 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1985

Ray Denenberg, Bob Rader, Thomas P. Brown, Wayne Davison and Fred Lauber

The Linked Systems project (LSP) is directed towards implementing computer‐to‐computer communications among its participants. The original three participants are the…

Abstract

The Linked Systems project (LSP) is directed towards implementing computer‐to‐computer communications among its participants. The original three participants are the Library of Congress (LC), the Research Libraries Group (RLG), and the Western Library Network (WLN, formerly the Washington Library Network). The project now has a fourth participant, the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC). LSP consists of two major components. The first component, Authorities Implementation, is described in Library Hi Tech issue 10 (page 61). The second component, the Standard Network Interconnection (SNI), is the specification of the LSP protocols, and the implementation of these protocols on the participant systems. Protocol specification was a joint effort of the original three participants (LC, RLG, and WLN) and was described in Library Hi Tech issue 10 (page 71). Implementation, however, has consisted of individual efforts of the (now) four participants. This four‐part report focuses on these individual implementation efforts.

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Library Hi Tech, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1977

Lucy A. Tedd

Discusses similarities and differences in the various definitions of the word network. It has come to have two meanings in the library and information science field…

Abstract

Discusses similarities and differences in the various definitions of the word network. It has come to have two meanings in the library and information science field. Firstly there are bibliographic or logical networks and secondly there are computer or physical networks. All definitions comply to it being a series of points interconnected by communications chAnnels. In the past, libraries have used postal, telephone, van and telex services to communicate with other libraries. Increasingly they will need to receive and transmit digital information—information going to and from computer systems. Describes and illustrates the equipment needed to transmit such information on‐line: terminals; modems and acoustic couplers; and telecommunications chAnnels—their speed, mode of sending information, and types. In the context of physical networks, explains and assesses packet‐switching, and discusses: the protocol X25, to be used in EURONET; possible shapes of computer networks; physical networks of use to libraries. Mentions a number of logical networks, and refers to published literature.

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Program, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1986

Hank Epstein

The design of an online public access catalog greatly affects the performance and capacity requirements of the computer system. The characteristics of traditional menu and…

Abstract

The design of an online public access catalog greatly affects the performance and capacity requirements of the computer system. The characteristics of traditional menu and command‐driven systems that most affect performance are explained.

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Library Hi Tech, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1976

B.M. Doouss and G.L. Collins

This monograph defines distributed intelligence and discusses the relationship of distributed intelligence to data base, justifications for using the technique, and the…

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61

Abstract

This monograph defines distributed intelligence and discusses the relationship of distributed intelligence to data base, justifications for using the technique, and the approach to successful implementation of the technique. The approach is then illustrated by reference to a case study of experience in Birds Eye Foods. The planning process by which computing strategy for the company was decided is described, and the planning conclusions reached to date are given. The current state of development in the company is outlined and the very real savings so far achieved are specified. Finally, the main conclusions of the monograph are brought together. In essence these conclusions are that major savings are achievable using distributed intelligence, and that the implementation of a company data processing plan can be made quicker and simpler by its use. However, careful central control must be maintained so as to avoid fragmentation of machine, language skills, and application taking place.

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Management Decision, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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