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Article

Bahar Durmaz, Stephen Platt and Tan Yigitcanlar

The paper aims to examine the role of creative industries in general and the film industry in particular for place‐making, spatial development, tourism, and the formation…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to examine the role of creative industries in general and the film industry in particular for place‐making, spatial development, tourism, and the formation of creative cities.

Design/methodology/approach

The article reveals the preliminary findings of two case studies from Beyoglu, Istanbul, and Soho, London.

Findings

The research found a relation between place and creativity and the positive contribution to creativity of being in a city center. Among the creative industries, the film industry plays an important role in the economic and spatial development of cities by fostering endogenous creativeness, attracting exogenous talent, and contributing to the formation of places that creative cities require.

Originality/value

The paper raises interesting questions about the importance of place to creativity, also questioning whether creative industries can be a driver for regeneration.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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Book part

Micah Trippe

This chapter will use A Propos de Nice, filmed by Jean Vigo and Boris Kaufman in February and March 1930, as a case study to illustrate how city films created segmented…

Abstract

This chapter will use A Propos de Nice, filmed by Jean Vigo and Boris Kaufman in February and March 1930, as a case study to illustrate how city films created segmented views of quotidian urban life in both form and content. In terms of form, short clips are juxtaposed in a rapid montage to form a segmented portrait of the city. In terms of content, the segments in Vigo's film, and the city film genre as a whole, are full of everyday events such as drinking coffee, washing clothes, sunbathing, and playing boules. The portrait of Nice that emerges within the film, then, is one of quotidian segmentation. This chapter will conduct a visual analysis of the film as it progresses, situating it within the history of Nice, cinematic conceptions of the city prior to its production, the city film genre, and the French avant-garde.

Details

Everyday Life in the Segmented City
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-259-3

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Article

Sweden, with a 3.4 million labour force, 45 per cent of it in commerce, transport and the service industries, tackles the problem of re‐training in a thoroughly…

Abstract

Sweden, with a 3.4 million labour force, 45 per cent of it in commerce, transport and the service industries, tackles the problem of re‐training in a thoroughly imaginative way, as a film Investment in Manpower (col, 30 min) shows. Their National Labour Board deals with it in the round, fitting the men to the jobs, and treating its material throughout as human beings with modern human needs. There are no age limits, and prejudices about being too old to learn are firmly squashed. Rail fares to attend interview are paid, moving costs met, and grants given to keep the home going while training.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 6 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Book part

Lorenzo Tripodi

This volume of Research in Urban Sociology derives from the conference ‘Everyday life in the segmented city’ held in July 2010 in Florence, and is composed of a selection…

Abstract

This volume of Research in Urban Sociology derives from the conference ‘Everyday life in the segmented city’ held in July 2010 in Florence, and is composed of a selection of papers originally presented on this occasion. Starting from the epochal assumption that for the first time in human history the majority of the world's population lives in urban environment, the conference gathered a set of presentations dealing with issues of global urbanization, showing a multiplicity of approaches and points of view which we tried to preserve within the limits of this publication. Urbanization is a phenomenon inscribed into globalization process with enormous consequences in the transformation of urban space and the everyday life of citizens: a dynamics which is reflected also in a flourishing analytical discourse that increasingly transcends the boundaries of established urban disciplines. The progressive extension of the urban domain beyond the limits of the city, and across diverse scales, has its corollary in the progressive segmentation of the urban dimension along multiple lines of material, social, economic, cultural and ethnic nature. Here we have chosen the perspective of the everyday to analyse how practices and policy can overcome the spin towards fragmentation and anomy and reinforce social cohesion for a more just and liveable city, endorsing the ‘right to the city’ as postulated by the seminal work of Henri Lefebvre. Although not specifically focused on his work, this collection clearly reveals the fundamental influence of the French philosopher over the knowledge and critique of late modern spatial production (Lefebvre, 1991b), and the net of Lefebvre's concept which connect different papers constitutes an evident subtext to this volume of Research in Urban Sociology. The original structure of the conference foresaw five distinct thematic sections, entitled ‘Right to the city’, ‘Cinematic urbanism’, ‘Governance and planning’, ‘Re-appropriation of urban spaces,’ and ‘Suburbanization and post urban cities’. Ultimately, in composing this volume we decided not to adopt those thematic areas as distinct sections, as many papers demonstrated the interdependence of these topics, escaping a strong separation of the arguments. On the contrary, the five topics recur all along this volume as transversal issues connecting almost all contributions. In the Introduction we aim at retracing those connections, starting from the dialectic evocated by the title between ‘everyday life’ practices of the inhabitants and what has been named here ‘segmented city’ as an epitome of the contemporary city in the age of globalization.

Details

Everyday Life in the Segmented City
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-259-3

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Book part

Karen F. Gracy and Michèle Valerie Cloonan

Moving images represent a category of material which has historically received short shrift in most libraries and archives. Film, video, and now digital images form a…

Abstract

Moving images represent a category of material which has historically received short shrift in most libraries and archives. Film, video, and now digital images form a significant part of many library and archival collections, however, and can be found in many formats and genres. Despite the ubiquity of such media in cultural institutions, the majority of libraries and archives owning collections of moving images have neglected these holdings—with the specific exception of those few archives devoted primarily to the care and preservation of moving images.

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12-024627-4

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Article

Chan Ka Ming

Since the launch of the Mainland and Hong Kong Closer Economic Partnership Arrangement (CEPA) in 2003, Hong Kong cinema is believed to have confronted drastic changes…

Abstract

Purpose

Since the launch of the Mainland and Hong Kong Closer Economic Partnership Arrangement (CEPA) in 2003, Hong Kong cinema is believed to have confronted drastic changes. Hong Kong cinema is described to be dying, lacking creative space and losing local distinctiveness. A decade later, the rise of Hong Kong – China coproduction cinema under CEPA has been normalized and changed the once pessimism in the industry. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how Hong Kong cinema adjusted its production and creation in the first 10 years of CEPA.

Design/methodology/approach

Beginning with a review of the overall development, three paradigmatic cases are examined for reflecting upon what the major industrial and commercial concerns on the Hong Kong – China coproduction model are, and how such a coproduction model is not developed as smooth as what the Hong Kong filmmakers expected.

Findings

Collectively, this paper singles out the difficulties in operation and the limit of transnationality that occur in the Chinese context for the development of Hong Kong cinema under the Hong Kong – China coproduction model.

Originality/value

This is the author’s research in his five-year study of Hong Kong cinema and it contributes a lot to the field of cinema studies with relevant industrial and policy concern.

Details

Social Transformations in Chinese Societies, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1871-2673

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Article

Sanford Berman

It's not enough to simply acquire alternative and small‐press materials. They must also be made easily accessible to library users by means of accurate, intelligible, and…

Abstract

It's not enough to simply acquire alternative and small‐press materials. They must also be made easily accessible to library users by means of accurate, intelligible, and thorough cataloging.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article

Russell Belk

The purpose of this review is to offer a summary of visual and projective research methods that have been applied or may be applied fruitfully in an Asian context…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this review is to offer a summary of visual and projective research methods that have been applied or may be applied fruitfully in an Asian context. Examples are provided and a delineation of the strengths and weaknesses of the methods is made.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a review article covering a number of different relevant methods and briefly reviewing studies that have been conducted in Asia using these methods.

Findings

The paper reviews five different uses of qualitative visual and projective methods in Asian consumer and market research: as archival data for analysis; as direct stimuli for data collection; as projective stimuli for data collection; as a means for recording qualitative data; and as a means for presenting qualitative findings.

Research limitations/implications

It is suggested that Asia contains a rich visual culture and that the research techniques reviewed offer compelling means for enhancing data collection, data analysis, and findings presentations from qualitative market and consumer research in Asia.

Originality/value

The paper brings together a diverse array of prior research illustrating the potential of the methods reviewed. In addition to discussing this research a number of references are provided for those wishing to examine these methods in greater detail and apply them to their own research.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Book part

James Peltz and Anita C. Street

This chapter explores how data-driven methods such as Artificial Intelligence pose real concerns for individual privacy. The current paradigm of collecting data from those…

Abstract

This chapter explores how data-driven methods such as Artificial Intelligence pose real concerns for individual privacy. The current paradigm of collecting data from those using online applications and services is reinforced by significant potential profits that the private sector stands to realize by delivering a broad range of services to users faster and more conveniently. Terms of use and privacy agreements are a common source of confusion, and are written in a way that dulls their impact and dopes most into automatically accepting a certain level of risk in exchange for convenience and “free” access. Third parties, including the government, gain access to these data in numerous ways. If the erosion of individual protections of privacy and the potential dangers this poses to our autonomy and democratic ideals were not alarming enough, the digital surrogate product of “you” that is created from this paradigm might one day freely share thoughts, buying habits, and your pattern of life with whoever owns these data. We use an ethical framework to assess key factors in these issues and discuss some of the dilemmas posed by Artificial Intelligence methods, the current norm of sharing one's data, and what can be done to remind individuals to value privacy. Will our digital surrogate one day need protections too?

Details

Artificial Intelligence and Global Security
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-812-4

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Article

Rodney Jensen

The purpose of this research has been to compile an up to date survey of the management methods of the film and television industries used by local and regional government…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research has been to compile an up to date survey of the management methods of the film and television industries used by local and regional government agencies in international production centres. It was intended that the results of the survey would clarify differences in mode of operation and governance and the factors that may contribute to their “attractiveness” from the point of view of the film production market.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used a combination of written questions and telephone interviews to elicit responses from selected agencies in English‐speaking countries. A typology of different management approaches has been prepared on the basis of the survey data.

Findings

The main findings are that the primary government role is connected with film production management, yet very limited evidence has been found for proactive spatial/economic planning support for the industry by local or regional government.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of the research relate to the smallness of the sample and the difficulty, in some cases, of eliciting meaningful responses. The implications of the findings are considered to be of considerable relevance to desirable modes of governance, the need for planning reform, and ways in which production management processes can be better streamlined. The potential role for local or regional government in adopting practices more in tune with market requirements has considerable implications for the creative and cultural economy, and the findings are of relevance to government decision makers and senior policy staff.

Social implications

The social implications are indirect and theoretical as they relate to improvements in the cultural landscape of spatial industry clusters. They have not been examined in this paper.

Originality/value

This research program is considered to have originality in that it bridges distinct areas of inquiry usually dealt with by separate professions or skill‐sets (film production, governance and management). Its originality is supported by the limited data discovered in the literature on this combination of topics.

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