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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Kirsten Greenhalgh and Vivienne Brunsden

169

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Chris Onions and Loel Collins

– The purpose of this paper is to consider the performance of quick-release harness buoyancy aids in water rescue.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the performance of quick-release harness buoyancy aids in water rescue.

Design/methodology/approach

The assumption is questioned that the performance of water rescue harnesses, in what is perceived as benign, low-flow conditions (<1.85 km/s) is acceptable. Increasingly, rescue personnel are deployed to flooding events during which low-flow, but high-hazard conditions may prevail. A range of commercially available buoyancy aids manufactured in the UK were tested under “real world conditions” and the nature of the release rated.

Findings

The primary data illustrate that 25 per cent of releases where incomplete in low-flow conditions. By analogy a karabiner in a rope rescue system with a 1:4 chance of failure would be unacceptable. Consequently, harness testing, design, manufacture, use and deployment may all be in need of reconsideration if the harness is to remain suitable for its current deployment.

Originality/value

A group of international experts from the USA, Europe and the UK have reviewed the findings and highlight possible reasons for these failures. These comments form the basis for research in future papers.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 26 March 2018

Fernando Martin Roxas and Andrea Santiago

Managing non-profit organizations, social enterprises, strategic management for small entities and tourism.

Abstract

Subject area

Managing non-profit organizations, social enterprises, strategic management for small entities and tourism.

Study level/applicability

Useful for graduate students enrolled in courses with development aspects. Undergraduate students learning about non-profit organizations can also benefit.

Case overview

This is a case of a small non-profit organization that is struggling to formalize its operating systems to generate sufficient surplus to plough funds back to the community that it envisioned to serve. The protagonist has to make a decision of whether to invest large sums in a health center for permanent visibility or to implement health services on a smaller scale given its current level of operations. Whether the protagonists’ operations are scaleable or not is also in question, as its main activity – slum tours – is not a widely accepted concept.

Expected learning outcomes

1. Students will understand the challenges of starting and growing non-profit organizations. 2. Students will recognize the need to make operations efficient and to establish control systems to manage enterprise resources. 3. Students will realize that decision-making requires the balancing of interests of multiple stakeholders. 4. Students will learn to analyze the options of financing social projects considering marketing, operations and financial data. 5. Students will gain better appreciation of the merits and demerits of slum tourism.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1945

The observations in an article upon British wines which appeared in the January issue of the JOURNAL have occasioned the publication in The Wine and Spirit Trade Review of some…

Abstract

The observations in an article upon British wines which appeared in the January issue of the JOURNAL have occasioned the publication in The Wine and Spirit Trade Review of some comments endorsing views which we set forth, and also the publication in the same periodical of a letter addressed to the BRITISH FOOD JOURNAL, from Mr. G. Gordon Watt, of Messrs. Lamb & Watt, Ltd., in which he protests against certain views which he attributes to us, but which, in fact, are nowhere to be found in the article in question. The policy of this JOURNAL for the last nearly fifty years has always been to encourage and assist the producer of good and genuine products, and our duty to the public and to the honest manufacturer is to call attention to practices which we consider are not in the best interests of either. We do not underrate the position which the British wine industry has won for itself; the fact that in pre‐war years some six million gallons of these wines were produced and sold, sufficiently attests their popularity and the need which the industry meets, and undoubtedly it has played an important part during the war years in filling the gap created by the almost total exclusion of the importation of foreign wines for the British market. British wines are perfectly good and genuine products and occupy a legitimate position in the beverages of the country provided that they conform to the descriptions under which they are sold. In this connection we adhere to the opinion which we have already expressed, that where wines bear a foreign appellation, such as “Port Type,” “Sherry Type” or “British Sherry,” the purchaser is entitled to expect that the fruit of the vine is an essential part of the raw material used in the production of the wine. It has been suggested that it would be useful to both makers and consumers if some standard could be established for British wines which would prevent the sale under that description of concoctions which have none of the attributes of wine. In the event of standards ultimately being established, we are of the opinion that for the purposes of preservation it is desirable that wines of the Port and Sherry types should contain 28/29 degrees of proof spirit.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1976

Government appointed and sponsored committees of every description—select, ad hoc, advisory, inquiry—such a prominent feature of the public scene since the last War, are…

Abstract

Government appointed and sponsored committees of every description—select, ad hoc, advisory, inquiry—such a prominent feature of the public scene since the last War, are understandable, even acceptable, reflect the urgency of the times in which we live. In the gathering gloom of more recent twilight years, they have flourished inordinately, especially in the socio‐political field, where most of their researches have been conducted. Usually embellished with the name of the figure‐head chairman, almost always expensively financed, they have one thing in common—an enormous output of words, telling us much of what we already know. So much of it seems dull, meaningless jargon, reflecting attitudes rather than sound, general principles.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 78 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1978

Application of the numerical method to the art of Medicine was regarded not as a “trivial ingenuity” but “an important stage in its development”; thus proclaimed Professor…

Abstract

Application of the numerical method to the art of Medicine was regarded not as a “trivial ingenuity” but “an important stage in its development”; thus proclaimed Professor Bradford Hill, accepted as the father of medical statistics, a study still largely unintelligible to the mass of medical practitioners. The need for Statistics is the elucidation of the effects of multiple causes; this represents the essence of the statistical method and is most commendable. Conclusions reached empirically under statistical scrutiny have mistakes and fallacies exposed. Numerical methods of analysis, the mathematical approach, reveals data relating to factors in an investigation, which might be missed in empirical observation, and by means of a figure states their significance in the whole. A simplified example is the numerical analysis of food poisoning, which alone determines the commonest causative organisms, the commonest food vehicles and the organisms which affect different foods, as well as changes in the pattern, e.g., the rising incidence of S. agona and the increase of turkey (and the occasions on which it is served, such as Christmas parties), as a food poisoning vehicle. The information data enables preventive measures to be taken. The ever‐widening fields of Medicine literally teem with such situations, where complexities are unravelled and the true significance of the many factors are established. Almost every sphere of human activity can be similarly measured. Apart from errors of sampling, problems seem fewer and controversy less with technical methods of analysis then on the presentation and interpretation of figures, or as Bradford Hill states “on the application of common sense and on elementary rules of logic”.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 80 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 24 February 2012

Chris Baumann, Hamin Hamin and Rosalie L. Tung

This study aims to investigate investing and borrowing behavior in retail banking between ethnic groups, specifically the Caucasians vis‐à‐vis the Chinese.

2681

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate investing and borrowing behavior in retail banking between ethnic groups, specifically the Caucasians vis‐à‐vis the Chinese.

Design/methodology/approach

A total sample of 645 Caucasians and Chinese in Australia, Canada and China were tested for their level of business assigned to their main banks, defined as share of wallet (SOW) in this study. The study applied multivariate analyses.

Findings

No significant differences were found between the ethnic Chinese in Australia and Canada in comparison to their counterparts in mainland China, or compared with the Caucasians in Australia and Canada. This finding of convergence suggests that ethnic Chinese have adapted to the local banking behavior. The ethnic Chinese in Australia and Canada assigned 81‐88 percent of their assets to their main banks, in comparison to only 72 percent for their counterparts in China and 73 percent for the Caucasians. As such, the ethnic Chinese in Australia and Canada have developed their own unique behavior, resulting in crossvergence: an over‐adaptation to local behavior in managing their assets, and a mid‐way approach between the Chinese in China and the local Caucasians when it comes to borrowing money.

Practical implications

For bank marketing managers, this form of crossvergence constitutes a challenge as it suggests that gaining the trust of Chinese customers is complex since the SOW is lowest in the booming emerging market (i.e. China) whereas ethnic Chinese consumers in Western markets have formed their own unique pattern of allocating business to their banks. “Ethnic banking” is suggested to offer tailored services to ethnic groups in order to satisfy their specific money management.

Originality/value

This study establishes that Chinese consumers in Western markets are a distinct consumer group. Products and services need to be specially customized to suit their wants and needs.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1983

Memories and musings of the long ago reveal revolutionary changes in the world's food trade and in particular, food sources and marketing in the United Kingdom. Earliest memories…

Abstract

Memories and musings of the long ago reveal revolutionary changes in the world's food trade and in particular, food sources and marketing in the United Kingdom. Earliest memories of the retail food trade are of many small shops; it used to be said that, given a good site, food would always sell well. There were multiples, but none of their stores differed from the pattern and some of the firms — Upton's, the International, were household names as they are now. Others, eg., the Maypole, and names that are lost to memory, have been absorbed in the many mergers of more recent times. Food production has changed even more dramatically; countries once major sources and massive exporters, have now become equally massive importers and completely new sources of food have developed. It all reflects the political changes, resulting from two World Wars, just as the British market reflects the shifts in world production.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 85 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 28 June 2013

Karen Seashore Louis

The purpose of this paper is to present the author's commentary on the special issue of Journal of Educational Administration entitled “Systemwide reform: examining districts…

737

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the author's commentary on the special issue of Journal of Educational Administration entitled “Systemwide reform: examining districts under pressure”.

Design/methodology/approach

The author gives her personal opinions, draws upon her recent experiences in the national study of US district leadership for school improvement, recent engagement with one specific US district's improvement efforts and work with colleagues in Europe on how a nation's culture mediates global policy trends.

Findings

One striking feature is the degree to which the language of “New Public Management” (is suffused within all of the papers).

Originality/value

The author notes that each paper peels a layer of the opaque onion of systemic school reform initiatives in the USA and was struck by the papers’ insight into current policy and administrative dilemmas facing districts in the USA – and also by their uniquely American perspective.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 51 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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