Search results

1 – 3 of 3
Open Access
Article
Publication date: 22 November 2021

Chris Kossen and Chia-Yi Ooi

This paper reports on how micro-learning design principles are being trialled in an Australian and a Malaysian university to make online courses more accessible and attractive…

7158

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reports on how micro-learning design principles are being trialled in an Australian and a Malaysian university to make online courses more accessible and attractive, and a more positive experience, with the aim of increasing student success. Central to this approach is segmenting materials into “bite-size” instalments by way of short micro-lecture presentations and reducing other content. The aim of this “less is more” strategy is to reduce unnecessary cognitive load as an impediment to learning so that focus can shift to prioritising the most essential skills and content. The purpose of this trial is to explore the efficacy of micro-learning as a means for increasing student engagement and learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The trials involved a mixed mode methodology drawing on qualitative and ratings data from course satisfaction surveys and records on grades and completion.

Findings

To date, results have shown significant increases in student engagement and satisfaction, and also performance. Our application of micro-learning included reducing volume of content based on its practical value, use of novelty (e.g. infusing guest presenter input) and design of practical and collaborative student activities.

Research limitations/implications

Early results are encouraging regarding apparent utility for engaging learners and ease of application, i.e. implementability and transference potential. However, the rapidly expanding area of online learning requires further research to establish a well-validated evidence base for effective online teaching practices.

Practical implications

The findings are relevant to universities involved in online and blended learning. Micro-learning design methods show promise in being able to address major engagement barriers including cognitive overload.

Social implications

More students are struggling with learning in today's social environment brought about with the massification of higher education. Micro-learning seeks to address major barriers these learners face with methods that go beyond traditional teaching practices.

Originality/value

Findings here are encouraging and contribute to existing understanding on ways to increase learner engagement in the competitive and fast-growing area of online learning for universities globally.

Details

Asian Association of Open Universities Journal, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1858-3431

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 October 2021

Chris Kossen, Nicole McDonald and Peter McIlveen

Australia's agricultural industry has become highly dependent on young low-cost, overseas “working holiday” visa workers known as “backpackers”, who are notoriously subject to…

Abstract

Purpose

Australia's agricultural industry has become highly dependent on young low-cost, overseas “working holiday” visa workers known as “backpackers”, who are notoriously subject to exploitative workplace practices. This study aimed to explore backpackers' experiences in terms of how job demands, job resources and personal resources influence their appraisals of working in agriculture.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth semi-structured interviews were used to explore the work experiences of N = 21 backpackers employed under the Australian Working Holiday visa (subclass 417). Data were analyzed by thematic analysis and organized in terms of job demands and resources.

Findings

This study revealed job demands commonly experienced by agricultural backpacker workers (e.g. precarity, physically strenuous work, low pay), and job resources (e.g. adequate training, feedback) and personal resources (e.g. attitude, language) that buffer the demands. The findings indicate that backpackers' appraisals of their experiences and performance decline when demands outweigh resources.

Originality/value

This study offers an emic perspective on the work of an understudied segment of the agricultural workforce. The findings have implications for improving work practices and policies aimed at attracting and retaining this important labor source in the future.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2010

Erica Smith, Andrew Smith and Chris Selby Smith

This paper aims to examine the employment and training of mature‐aged workers, so that suggestions for improving training for mature‐aged workers may be offered.

2943

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the employment and training of mature‐aged workers, so that suggestions for improving training for mature‐aged workers may be offered.

Design/methodology/approach

Six expert interviews were carried out by telephone, and three case studies involving company site visits were completed. Each company case study involved interviews with managers, trainers and mature‐aged workers. The study was confined to the manufacturing industry.

Findings

Mature‐aged workers bring many advantages to workplaces and some employers show a definite preference for them over younger workers; but in some cases training needs to take account of lack of confidence and literacy and health issues. However, there is great diversity among mature‐aged workers.

Research limitations/implications

The research is confined to shop‐floor workers in manufacturing, and does not address training of mature‐aged managers and professionals. The research is small‐scale but provides new insights, and importantly the voices of the workers themselves.

Practical implications

The paper identifies managerial and training practices that can immediately be implemented.

Originality/value

The paper identifies some issues that can be taken up at a policy level as well as within companies. For example, the preference for qualification‐based training at a national level is not necessarily consistent with what mature‐aged workers prefer.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

1 – 3 of 3