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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

David F. Elloy and Catherine R. Smith

The dual‐career phenomenon has become increasingly prevalent worldwide. This lifestyle often generates stresses and strains, at home and at work, for couples juggling multiple…

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Abstract

The dual‐career phenomenon has become increasingly prevalent worldwide. This lifestyle often generates stresses and strains, at home and at work, for couples juggling multiple demands, which can have negative consequences for organisations. While most empirical research into this lifestyle has been conducted in the United States and Britain, very little has been carried out in Australia. This particular study, based on data from an Australian sample of 121 lawyers and accountants, was therefore aimed at analysing the levels of stress, work‐family conflict and overload among dual‐career and single‐career couples. The results confirm that dual‐career couples experience higher levels of stress, work‐family conflict and overload than single‐career couples. To enhance labour productivity and organisational effectiveness, human resource managers therefore need to take account of the potential for dual‐career stress, overload and conflict, and respond flexibly to dual‐career employee status.

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Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Catherine R. Smith

This paper reports on a recent Australian study of 20 “copreneurial” marital partners who own and manage a small business together. For “copreneurs”, the disadvantages of living…

2311

Abstract

This paper reports on a recent Australian study of 20 “copreneurial” marital partners who own and manage a small business together. For “copreneurs”, the disadvantages of living and working together are outweighed by opportunities for maximum autonomy and personal control, and working together in a common cause which capitalises on individual strengths and values. Work and family management is enhanced by this form of family business, allowing partners to combine career and home duties flexibly and effectively. Traditional gender roles are apparent in “copreneurship”, with women predominantly responsible for the home domain and family care. “Copreneurship” helps promote a “family‐friendly” work environment for the business partners and for their employees. This “family‐friendly” culture also fosters an entrepreneurial spirit in children, which bodes well for the next generation of small business owners and salaried employees.

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Women in Management Review, vol. 15 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Catherine R. Smith

Recognizing changing demographics and the importance of balancingthe workforce, proactive organizations are now pursuing deliberatestrategies to improve women′s employment and…

Abstract

Recognizing changing demographics and the importance of balancing the workforce, proactive organizations are now pursuing deliberate strategies to improve women′s employment and career opportunities for women at all levels of industry. Describes some parallel Australian initiatives. These include moves to facilitate the combination of work and family responsibilities, particularly beneficial for women. These initiatives bode well for women′s career development generally, and particularly within the realms of senior management.

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Women in Management Review, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1997

Catherine R. Smith

Discusses the gendered culture of management education and its role in perpetuating a gendered culture of management, which in turn inhibits the equitable progression of women…

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Abstract

Discusses the gendered culture of management education and its role in perpetuating a gendered culture of management, which in turn inhibits the equitable progression of women through the ranks of management. Reports findings from a recent Australian survey which revealed a masculine bias in management education, which disadvantages both female and male learners. Perceived gender paradigms of male educators may result in women learners being more disadvantaged than men, and issues of concern to male students can cause much greater concern to their female counterparts. The research led to the production of an award‐winning video, Gender Issues in Management: Capitalising on Awareness of Diversity. This constitutes an additional teaching resource for management educators, trainers, consultants and others working on diversity issues.

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Women in Management Review, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

Catherine R. Smith

Describes trends in the dual‐career research literature, whichshows that conflicting demands of home and work are exacerbated whenboth partners strive for upward career…

Abstract

Describes trends in the dual‐career research literature, which shows that conflicting demands of home and work are exacerbated when both partners strive for upward career progression, disadvantaging women more than men, and adversely affecting their work performance. Directions for future work in the area are indicated, including more studies of women managers. Employers have a key role to play in enhancing both organizational and individual benefits, by acknowledging the interrelationship between home and work, and the conflicting demands and loyalties facing dual‐career couples, and adopting innovative and flexible work options.

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Women in Management Review, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1993

Catherine R. Smith, Margaret Crowley and Jacquie Hutchinson

For the last ten years there has been substantial encouragement forwomen to broaden their career horizons and enter into non‐traditionalareas of work. In the mining industry in…

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Abstract

For the last ten years there has been substantial encouragement for women to broaden their career horizons and enter into non‐traditional areas of work. In the mining industry in particular, women now work as geologists, surveyors, mechanical engineers, electrical engineers, environmental scientists, chemical engineers, and production workers, in some of the most remote and hostile locations in Australia. Given the strategic role of the mining industry within the Australian economy, and the resources which individuals, organizations and governments have already invested in training and development, one would expect that these women could look forward to a long and productive future in the industry. Instead, many younger women in particular are considering leaving the industry. In 1991 Commonwealth funding was made available by WREIP for a research project on women in mining. Based on data derived from a workshop based on this research, this article examines the reasons why women are considering deserting a workplace which they strove so hard to enter. It considers issues such as the implications of ineffective management practices, particularly within the context of career development; the implications of management failure to acknowledge the “genderedness” of organizations; and the limitations of current equal employment opportunity and affirmative action legislation to produce the necessary structural and attitudinal changes.

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International Journal of Career Management, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6214

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1997

Catherine R. Smith

Presents findings from a study investigating the career transitions of a sample of dual‐career managerial couples within Australian organizations. Results confirm that job changes…

3922

Abstract

Presents findings from a study investigating the career transitions of a sample of dual‐career managerial couples within Australian organizations. Results confirm that job changes are complex processes, which are determined by biographical factors such as sex, age, parental status, stakeholder influence and career salience. However, they are very much influenced by work factors such as the culture of the employing organization. Recommends more flexible career paths, employment practices and managerial conventions, to facilitate the career development of the growing numbers of dual‐career couples, and to enhance labour retention and organizational productivity.

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Career Development International, vol. 2 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Catherine R. Smith

Reports on an Australian survey comparing women and men students’ perceptions of learning advantages and disadvantages in management education. Findings suggest a masculine bias…

2716

Abstract

Reports on an Australian survey comparing women and men students’ perceptions of learning advantages and disadvantages in management education. Findings suggest a masculine bias, which disadvantages both female and male learners. Issues of concern to male students give much greater concern to their female counterparts. Gender paradigms of male educators appear to particularly disadvantage women’s learning experiences. Implications for management educators and learners are discussed. The research led to a video on awareness of gender diversity in management, which won the Australian National Award for Best Practice in Adult Education/Human Resource Development 1996.

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

The role of women in Europe Volume 97, Number 2 of European Business Review includes an article with this title by Marilyn M. Helms and Cynthia J. Guffey. They argue that with…

Abstract

The role of women in Europe Volume 97, Number 2 of European Business Review includes an article with this title by Marilyn M. Helms and Cynthia J. Guffey. They argue that with major events including the European Economic Community, German unification and the fall of the former Soviet Union, there is an increased reality of a large united Europe. With these societal and political changes comes change in the role of women. As the number of women entering the labour market increased, the effect of job equality must be investigated. Examines the role of women in the European workforce. Discusses areas such as promotion, mentoring, education, compensation and reform recommendations. Shows that four key economic, demographic, and organisational trends are creating positive effects for women in the European labour force.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 16 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1992

Quebec was the first Canadian jurisdiction to legislate on pay equality. It did so through the adoption of the Charter of Rights and Freedom, in 1976, a passive legislation since…

Abstract

Quebec was the first Canadian jurisdiction to legislate on pay equality. It did so through the adoption of the Charter of Rights and Freedom, in 1976, a passive legislation since it is based on complaints. It seems to be a matter of time before the Quebec Government passes a pro‐active legislation on pay equity and, in doing so, it will likely draw its inspiration from the Pay Equity Act (PEA) passed by the Ontario Government in 1987. One of PEAs important features is the emphasis on institutional structures and practices in determining the appropriate unit for the purpose of achieving pay equity. In practice, such units will often match up with the usual job families (e.g. clerical or office vs production jobs). However, the historical development of jobs families is intertwined with the evolution of occupational segregation between men and women in the labour markets.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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