Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
Article
Publication date: 14 June 2022

Stephanie E. Perrett, Christie Craddock, Gareth Dunseath, Giri Shankar, Stephen Luzio and Benjamin J. Gray

Smoking rates are known to be higher amongst those committed to prison than the general population. Those in prison suffer from high rates of comorbidities that are likely to…

Abstract

Purpose

Smoking rates are known to be higher amongst those committed to prison than the general population. Those in prison suffer from high rates of comorbidities that are likely to increase their risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), making it more difficult to manage. In 2016, a tobacco ban began to be implemented across prisons in England and Wales, UK. This study aims to measure the effect of the tobacco ban on predicted cardiovascular risk for those quitting smoking on admission to prison.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data from a prevalence study of CVD in prisons, the authors have assessed the effect of the tobacco ban on cardiovascular risk, using predicted age to CVD event, ten-year CVD risk and heart age, for those who previously smoked and gave up on admission to prison.

Findings

The results demonstrate measurable health gains across all age groups with the greatest gains found in those aged 50 years and older and who had been heavy smokers. Quitting smoking on admission to prison led to a reduced heart age of between two and seven years for all participants.

Originality/value

The data supports tobacco bans in prisons as a public health measure to reduce risk of CVD. Interventions are needed to encourage maintenance of smoking cessation on release from prison for the full health benefits to be realised.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 September 2019

Stephanie E. Perrett, Benjamin J. Gray, L. G., D. E. and Neville J. Brooks

Those in prison have expert knowledge of issues affecting their health and wellbeing. The purpose of this paper is to report on work undertaken with male prisoners. This paper…

Abstract

Purpose

Those in prison have expert knowledge of issues affecting their health and wellbeing. The purpose of this paper is to report on work undertaken with male prisoners. This paper presents learning and findings from the process of engaging imprisoned men as peer researchers.

Design/methodology/approach

The peer researcher approach offers an emic perspective to understand the experience of being in prison. The authors established the peer research role as an educational initiative at a long-stay prison in Wales, UK to determine the feasibility of engaging imprisoned men as peer researchers. Focus groups, interviews and questionnaires were used by the peer researchers to identify the health and wellbeing concerns of men in prison.

Findings

The project positively demonstrated the feasibility of engaging imprisoned men as peer researchers. Four recurring themes affecting health and wellbeing for men in a prison vulnerable persons unit were identified: communication, safety, respect and emotional needs. Themes were inextricably linked demonstrating the complex relationships between prison and health.

Originality/value

This was the first prison peer-research project to take place in Wales, UK. It demonstrates the value men in prison can play in developing the evidence base around health and wellbeing in prison, contributing to changes within the prison to improve health and wellbeing for all.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2024

Benjamin Thomas Gray and Matthew Sisto

The purpose of this study is to describe peer support work in a men’s mental health unit from a lived experience and service user’s perspective. The intertwining of process (a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to describe peer support work in a men’s mental health unit from a lived experience and service user’s perspective. The intertwining of process (a lived experience perspective) and subject (the therapeutic value of peer support) leads to greater knowledge and insight into peer support for people with mental health problems.

Design/methodology/approach

This service user narrative draws on the extracts from a reflective journal of interactions and conversations with people with mental health problems as well as feedback from service users and staff about the value of peer support. These methods allow a first-person, service user’s, reflective and narrative account of peer support work.

Findings

Peer support work, particularly hearing voices sessions, are found to be highly therapeutic and worthwhile. They promote insight and create feelings of safety and hope in what can sometimes be a frightening and hostile ward environment. Peer support provides emotional and practical support. Sharing stories and experiences of mental illness with people leads to trust, feelings of being valued, heard and accepted as well as better experiences of care and being seen as a person first. Due to their shared experiences, peer support workers are able to befriend people with mental health problems on the ward. Peer support work bridges the gap and vacuum of care between people with mental health problems and staff. It compensates for understaffing to provide more holistic and person-centred care and support.

Originality/value

Lived experience/ service user perspectives and narratives on peer support are rare, particularly in a hospital setting. This article provides a rich, perhaps overlooked and hidden narrative on the nature of peer support work. People with mental health problems, like Ben, are often excluded from society, health and social care, education, employment and research. This narrative opens up a pathway to understanding peer support from a service user perspective.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 3 September 2003

Michael R Mullen, C.M Sashi and Patricia M Doney

Market entry strategies range from foreign direct investment to licensing with varying levels of commitment, risk and opportunity. Exporting products or services is one of the…

Abstract

Market entry strategies range from foreign direct investment to licensing with varying levels of commitment, risk and opportunity. Exporting products or services is one of the most common of the intermediate market entry strategies. It is typically accomplished through authorized international channels of distribution. However, when significant price differences exist between markets, alternative, parallel channels of distribution are almost certain to arise. These parallel channels, often referred to as gray marketing, are generally legal but unauthorized distribution channels that create an alternative export market entry. After a review of the literature, a case study highlights these complex issues from the perspective of both manufacturer and parallel marketer. The case study provides a tool for evaluating theory and a basis for discussing this important alternative mode of market entry. The case and the discussion which follows also highlight the role of international trade shows as an important element of the marketing mix for entering many foreign markets.

Details

Reviving Traditions in Research on International Market Entry
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-044-9

Article
Publication date: 16 September 2013

Benjamin Gray, John Larsen and Alison Faulkner

The physical health needs of people with mental health problems are currently under addressed and often ignored, both in training and in practice. The PRIMROSE trial intervention…

Abstract

Purpose

The physical health needs of people with mental health problems are currently under addressed and often ignored, both in training and in practice. The PRIMROSE trial intervention was designed to remedy that – focusing in particular on risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This paper describes how people with experience of using mental health services and carers contributed to the development of the PRIMROSE intervention. It draws out key messages for educators, researchers and practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a case study approach the paper outlines how a Third sector organisation supported the study team in setting up a Lived Experience Advisory Panel (LEAP), drawing on a pre-existing model and recent thinking about service user and carer involvement in research. It is described how the approach sought to engage wider involvement of people with an interest in CVD while also offering more focused input into specifically the development of the trial intervention.

Findings –

An innovative approach was taken whereby a large LEAP, comprising 27 service users and carers, was supporting the development of the study mainly through e-mail and web updates and feedback, while a sub-group of the LEAP, with eight members, met three times and had a focus on inputting ideas into the development of the intervention. The creation of a LEAP proved helpful to the project, resulting in an enhanced and more relevant intervention – summed up in a series of eleven recommendations. Appointment of an independent chair of the sub-group proved invaluable and there is learning from this project for other similar initiatives.

Originality/value

This study has value for others who are developing practice interventions. A range of suggestions were made which will have relevance for training, ensuring that physical health issues are not ignored. There is much to learn too from the process of this project, for the involvement of service users and carers in research, education and in practice development.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 September 2016

Jane W. Gibson and Benjamin J. Gray

To illuminate the underlying logic of western Kansas farmers’ decisions to irrigate at unsustainable rates and the state’s regulatory policies and practices that enable depletion…

Abstract

Purpose

To illuminate the underlying logic of western Kansas farmers’ decisions to irrigate at unsustainable rates and the state’s regulatory policies and practices that enable depletion of the Ogallala aquifer.

Methodology/approach

Ethnographic interviewing of 39 western Kansas farmers, state water management personnel, and archival research.

Findings

Farmers occupy an ambiguous position as petty capitalists who focus attention on their own farms with seasonal planning horizons, and they hold a view of “good stewardship” that melds economic and noneconomic considerations, and that provides a rationale for unsustainable irrigation practices. The state resolves the contradiction between the finite groundwater resource and ideological commitments to economic growth by devolving responsibility for water management to groundwater users.

Research limitations/implications

While the small sample size is likely to be representative of the larger pool of irrigators, further research with other farmers representative of the region will be necessary to verify findings.

Social implications

Depletion of the Ogallala aquifer contributes to farm consolidation and community decline, and the ecological costs will leave future farmers and remaining communities without the benefits of groundwater. Western Kansas will likely have to revert to a system of dryland farming.

Details

The Economics of Ecology, Exchange, and Adaptation: Anthropological Explorations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-227-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2008

Alvin J. Schexnider

This article addresses the critical need for exceptional leaders to shepherd the nationʼs Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in a post-Brown era where African…

Abstract

This article addresses the critical need for exceptional leaders to shepherd the nationʼs Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in a post-Brown era where African American students enjoy unlimited access to higher education in the United States. The article spotlights the many contributions Black colleges and universities have made to American society against insuperable odds since their inception in the mid-nineteenth century. It studies selected examples of HBCUs whose graduates have distinguished themselves in areas where other institutions enjoy centers of excellence. The article traces the historical inequities between major and minority institutions, the challenges HBCUs face in surmounting these disparities, and the growing tendency of Black students to exercise their options by enrolling at White colleges and universities. With the loss of a pure monopoly on African American students, Black colleges now must find leaders of exceptional talent and vision in order to ensure their survival. The article recommends strategies designed to surmount hurdles and enhance the viability of Black colleges and universities in an increasingly competitive environment.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

Abstract

Details

The Economics of Ecology, Exchange, and Adaptation: Anthropological Explorations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-227-9

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 1 September 2016

Abstract

Details

The Economics of Ecology, Exchange, and Adaptation: Anthropological Explorations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-227-9

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

1 – 10 of over 1000