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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Beaufort Longest

The purpose of this paper is to expand attention to responsible leader behavior in the world’s health sectors by explaining how this concept applies to health sectors, considering…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to expand attention to responsible leader behavior in the world’s health sectors by explaining how this concept applies to health sectors, considering why health sector leaders should behave responsibly, reviewing how they can do so, and asserting potential impact through an applied example.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a viewpoint, reflecting conceptualizations rooted in leadership literature which are then specifically applied to health sectors. A definition of responsible leader behavior is affirmed and applied specifically in health sectors. Conceptualizations and viewpoints about practice of responsible leader behavior in health sectors and potential consequences are then discussed and asserted.

Findings

Leadership failures and debacles found in health, but more so in other sectors, have led leadership researchers to offer insights, many of them empirical, into the challenges of leadership especially by more clearly delineating responsible leader behavior.

Practical implications

Much of what has been learned in the research about responsible leader behavior offers pathways for health sector leaders to more fully practice responsible leadership.

Social implications

This paper asserts and provides a supporting example that greater levels of responsible leader behavior in health sectors hold potentially important societal benefits.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to apply emerging conceptualizations and early empirical findings about responsible leader behavior specifically to leaders in health sectors.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 July 2005

Beaufort B. Longest

The incentives for organizations to practice good corporate citizenship include social expectations and pressures, the ingrained values of corporate leaders, and citizenship's…

Abstract

The incentives for organizations to practice good corporate citizenship include social expectations and pressures, the ingrained values of corporate leaders, and citizenship's contributions to business performance. In addition, healthcare organizations have a unique citizenship incentive because of the relationship between practicing corporate citizenship and achieving the core, health-enhancing purposes of these organizations. A template of six organization behaviors that have been empirically determined to be widely used citizenship-related behaviors is described, along with how a large healthcare organization exhibits these behaviors. A three-step process is described through which healthcare organizations can build competence in corporate citizenship by (1) incorporating citizenship commitments into their missions and giving citizenship a high priority; (2) organizing to build competence in corporate citizenship, and to facilitate and sustain citizenship performance; and (3) maintaining commitment to citizenship competence and increasing citizenship performance by conducting periodic citizenship audits, and acting on the results.

Details

Competence Perspectives on Resources, Stakeholders and Renewal
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-170-5

Book part
Publication date: 12 September 2001

Abstract

Details

Advances in Health Care Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-112-5

Book part
Publication date: 20 December 2000

Abstract

Details

Advances in Health Care Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-684-8

Book part
Publication date: 19 July 2005

Ron Sanchez and Aimé Heene

The competence-based perspective shares with the resource-based view the notion of the fundamental importance of an organization's resources in its competitive outcomes.1 In his…

Abstract

The competence-based perspective shares with the resource-based view the notion of the fundamental importance of an organization's resources in its competitive outcomes.1 In his paper “Probing into the nature of resources: Sustainable advantages and appropriable rents in the U.S. motion picture industry,” Jamal Shamsie investigates the sustainability of the competitive advantages that strategically important resources can bring to a firm, as well as the appropriability of the economic profits (rents) that can be derived from the uses of resources. To this end, the paper develops a classification of resource types based on the nature of a resource's ownership and control. Shamsie studies the U.S. motion picture industry to assess the degree of sustainable advantages and appropriable rents that can be generated by three types of resources: contracted resources, owned resources, and embedded resources. His findings suggest that in the subject industry both sustainability and appropriability are likely to be low for contracted resources such as top-rated stars and directors, while the greatest potential for sustainability and appropriability attach to embedded resources that accumulate firm-specific knowledge and learning in the development and marketing of various film genres.

Details

Competence Perspectives on Resources, Stakeholders and Renewal
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-170-5

Book part
Publication date: 31 October 2002

Abstract

Details

Advances in Health Care Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-176-7

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 19 July 2005

Abstract

Details

Competence Perspectives on Resources, Stakeholders and Renewal
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-170-5

Book part
Publication date: 19 July 2005

Abstract

Details

Competence Perspectives on Resources, Stakeholders and Renewal
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-170-5

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1992

SOME time ago leading aerospace and defence contractor Beaufort Engineering Ltd., encountered a major inspection bottle‐neck when producing batches of two similar, but highly…

Abstract

SOME time ago leading aerospace and defence contractor Beaufort Engineering Ltd., encountered a major inspection bottle‐neck when producing batches of two similar, but highly complex, turbine rotor components. As a very experienced, five‐axis machining facility, at Kirkby‐in‐Ashfield, near Nottingham, Beaufort had no real problem with cutting the parts.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 64 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1941

THE Bristol Beaufort (Type 152) is a twin‐engined, mid‐wing monoplane designed to carry out the duties of combined bomber, general reconnaissance, torpedo bomber, and general…

Abstract

THE Bristol Beaufort (Type 152) is a twin‐engined, mid‐wing monoplane designed to carry out the duties of combined bomber, general reconnaissance, torpedo bomber, and general purpose landplane.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 13 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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