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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2021

Keren Dopelt, Baruch Levi and Nadav Davidovitch

This paper aims to examine the views of physicians in senior management positions regarding the distinctive characteristics and roles of leaders in the Israeli health-care system…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the views of physicians in senior management positions regarding the distinctive characteristics and roles of leaders in the Israeli health-care system and what might be the interactions between management and leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 13 semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with physicians in senior management positions. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using the qualitative-phenomenological method.

Findings

Interviewees discerned leaders as exhibiting traits of transformational leadership and managers, as expressing characteristics of transactional leadership. Most interviewees asserted that physicians should act as social leaders promoting public health and equality in health care, beyond their clinical practice. They agreed that physicians should fill most senior positions in the health-care system, provided they undergo appropriate training in management, leadership and interdisciplinary collaboration.

Originality/value

Interviewees revealed gaps between the aspiration to lead, perceptions of physicians as leaders and what occurs in reality: physicians wish to assume leadership roles in the health-care system and emphasize the qualities of transformative leadership, but medical education does not include leadership training. Therefore, there is a need to develop training programs for physicians in management and leadership. There is also a need to integrate physicians from various communities to promote local leadership in the health-care field and to reduce disparities. The consideration of health-care leadership is especially applicable in the context of the Covid-19 pandemic, which has placed the question of leadership within and outside of the medical community in a broader social context.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

Marilyn Kleinberg Neimark

Critically examines the ways in which the boundaries of businessethics are being established within business schools, consulting firmsand corporations. Contrasts this official…

13256

Abstract

Critically examines the ways in which the boundaries of business ethics are being established within business schools, consulting firms and corporations. Contrasts this official discourse on ethics with an alternative, more socially informed, and potentially disruptive approach to the ethics of business.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1987

Gary Kurzbard and Gary F. Soldow

To claim that marketing is concerned with exchange is a currently accepted definition which allows wide interpretation and can be applied to almost all disciplines. A satisfactory…

2015

Abstract

To claim that marketing is concerned with exchange is a currently accepted definition which allows wide interpretation and can be applied to almost all disciplines. A satisfactory definition should develop both inclusionary and exclusionary criteria. Marketing has an underlying purpose connected with the exchange of goods and services, and ideas can be studied only if they serve that purpose. It should be placed firmly in the economic sphere, employing strategies intentionally rendered and goal‐directed. This definition allows wide consideration of diverse subject areas, but keeps the process within specific parameters, bringing about its more satisfactory development as a scientific discipline.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Angus J. Duff and Chris C.A. Chan

– To empirically consider work and career as potential influences of suicide.

1348

Abstract

Purpose

To empirically consider work and career as potential influences of suicide.

Design/methodology/approach

In this qualitative study we conducted in-depth semi-structured interviews with 16 individuals who were survivors (i.e. family members or intimates) of individuals who had committed suicide. Data was analyzed using a grounded theory methodology.

Findings

This exploratory study used purposive self-determination as the theoretical framework for analyzing their life histories. Factors of purposive self-determination, including lack of purpose, feeling controlled, experiencing failure, and social exclusion all figured prominently but differentially according to life-stage. Distinct work and career themes for early-career, mid-career and late-career suicides emerged. Early-career suicides were attributed to educational or work-related contexts, leading to a sense of hopelessness. Mid-career suicides emphasized despair based in failure. Finally, an attempt to escape from challenges associated with transitioning roles in retirements emerged as a key theme in late-career suicides.

Originality/value

Although suicide has been studied extensively from medical, psychopathological, sociological, anthropological, philosophical and religious perspectives, there is a dearth of research considering why certain individuals choose to end their own lives as a result of work and career related reasons. This study sought to contribute to our understanding of this under-researched phenomenon. Additionally, while extant careers theory and research has considered positive notions of career such as career success or careers as a calling, this work presents an alternate lens, the consideration of career failure and careers as a sentence.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

T.K. Das and David M. Boje

The field of interorganizational studies is not currently known for applying qualitative methodologies with the same enthusiasm as statistically‐based survey techniques. A review…

Abstract

The field of interorganizational studies is not currently known for applying qualitative methodologies with the same enthusiasm as statistically‐based survey techniques. A review of recent developments in qualitative methodologies reveals several techniques which can be fruitfully applied to the study of interorganizational (IO) networks. This paper extends the meaning‐based social definitionist perspective to the study of IO networks, by drawing upon the relevant theoretical aspects of social phenomenology, symbolic interactionism, and ethnomethodology. The social definitionist perspective is concerned with theories and methodologies relevant to the social definition and construction of meaning in multiple actor settings. Such a meaning‐based perspective would facilitate the application of qualitative methodologies to IO networks, in parallel with similar developments in organizational behavior. The paper identifies four specific types of qualitative analyses for IO studies: phenomenological typification, domain analysis, componential analysis, and conversational analysis.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Shelagh K. Mooney, Candice Harris and Irene Ryan

The purpose of this paper is to explore why workers remain in long hospitality careers and to challenge the frequent portrayal of careers in the sector as temporary and…

3541

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore why workers remain in long hospitality careers and to challenge the frequent portrayal of careers in the sector as temporary and unsatisfactory.

Design/methodology/approach

The study took an interpretative social constructionist approach. Methods used were memory-work, semi-structured interviews and intersectional analysis.

Findings

A key finding in this study is that career longevity in hospitality is not solely dependent on career progression. Strong social connection, a professional self-identity and complex interesting work contribute to long careers.

Research limitations/implications

The study contributes detailed empirical knowledge about hospitality career paths in New Zealand. Conclusions should be generalised outside the specific context with caution.

Practical implications

The findings that hospitality jobs can be complex and satisfying at all hierarchical ranks hold practical implications for Human Resource Managers in the service sector. To increase career longevity, hospitality employers should improve induction and socialisation processes and recognise their employees’ professional identity.

Social implications

This paper significantly extends the notion of belonging and social connection in service work. “Social connection” is distinctly different from social and networking career competencies. Strong social connection is created by a fusion of complex social relationships with managers, co-workers and guests, ultimately creating the sense of a respected professional identity and satisfying career.

Originality/value

The contemporary concept of a successful hospitality career is associated with an upwards career trajectory; however, this paper suggests that at the lower hierarchical levels of service work, many individuals enjoy complex satisfying careers with no desire for further advancement.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 October 2009

Moshe Sharabi

The purpose of the paper is to compare the importance of work and other areas of life, as well as preferred work goals, among Jewish and Muslim academic graduates who work in the…

1176

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to compare the importance of work and other areas of life, as well as preferred work goals, among Jewish and Muslim academic graduates who work in the Israeli labor market.

Design/methodology/approach

The Meaning‐of‐Work questionnaire was conducted on 362 Jewish and 73 Muslim academic graduates.

Findings

The research findings reveal significant differences in all areas of life (work, family, leisure, community and religion) and in six of the eleven work goals. The MDS of Jews and Muslims also demonstrate different perceptions and internalization of work values among the two ethnic groups.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this study are related to the measures (importance of life areas and preferred work goals). Using a single‐item measure and ranking measures may not be the optimal, but those measures were used in a variety of studies conducted in several countries.

Practical implications

The findings attributed to cultural differences, ethnic conflict, as well as to the employment opportunities given to Jewish and Muslim academic graduates. The extra‐high work centrality of Muslim academic graduates reflects high non‐actualized potential for organizations and for Israeli society.

Originality/value

Work values of Muslims in general, and of Muslim academic graduates in particular, have not yet been studied in Israel and this is a preliminary study, which interprets findings through cultural, economic and social aspects of Jews and Muslims in Israel.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 April 1990

Hershey H. Friedman and Paul J. Herskovitz

The purpose of the present study was to determine whether providing shoppers with a gift upon entering a store would result in an increase in sales. An experiment was conducted in…

317

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to determine whether providing shoppers with a gift upon entering a store would result in an increase in sales. An experiment was conducted in a pharmacy and a total of 200 subjects were used. The results showed that shoppers given a key chain and thanked for patronizing the store spent significantly more than a control group of shoppers who were not given any gift upon entry ($10.76 vs. $9.21). The results of this study are explained by reference to the literature on reciprocity and gift‐giving.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Yehuda Baruch and Sally Woodward

An investigation was undertaken into the important, yet neglected area of the people aspects of management buyout (MBO/MBI). Since prior work suggests that management is, by far…

2096

Abstract

An investigation was undertaken into the important, yet neglected area of the people aspects of management buyout (MBO/MBI). Since prior work suggests that management is, by far, one of the most crucial factors in the success of MBOs an in‐depth study focused on the characteristics of buyout managers, the culture of management buyout teams, and influences on behaviours during the transaction. This paper reports one part of the study ‐ that relating to management buyout stressors. The aspect of the transaction that generates the most stress was found to be time pressure. Generally, however, the results suggest that stressors, identified by the literature and through focus groups, were not perceived as stressful by this group of buyout managers. Related to this, was the finding that the majority were able to cope with these stressors. Regression analysis indicated that a key factor in manager’s ability to cope was the open/interactive nature of the management team culture.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 36 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2004

Simone Kirpal

This paper reports on a comparative qualitative study across four European countries which explored the formation of work identity amongst nurses and other professionals in the…

8233

Abstract

This paper reports on a comparative qualitative study across four European countries which explored the formation of work identity amongst nurses and other professionals in the field of health care. Within this sector, it identifies trends towards a more flexible, more highly skilled and more mobile workforce. Conversely, however, it is becoming difficult to recruit and retain staff due to increasing workload, decreasing job satisfaction and comparatively low pay. Occupational identity is theorised as a multi‐dimensional phenomenon, with structural, social and individual‐psychological components. A number of emerging common themes across the three dimensions and across the four national settings include structural conflicts between cost efficiency and quality of care, and individual conflicts between the core activity of caring for patients and the increasing demands of administration and other peripheral work. The study identifies a number of strategies used by nurses to balance these conflicting demands. Overall, the professional identity of nurses remains strong, but it is important for policy makers to be aware of the potential negative effects, in terms of staff turnover, mobility and job (dis)satisfaction, of the current state of the health care sector.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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