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Article
Publication date: 24 October 2023

Barrie Green and Jake Stanworth

This paper aims to critically compare the impact and preparedness for practice of two types of mental health nurse training in the UK. One being a hospital-based apprenticeship…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to critically compare the impact and preparedness for practice of two types of mental health nurse training in the UK. One being a hospital-based apprenticeship model from the 1980s; the other a university-based and more academically focussed approach from this millennium.

Design/methodology/approach

This autoethnographic reflective commentary describes and reviews the effectiveness of two training curricula for Registered Mental Nurse (RMN) training. The first being the certificate-level 1983 syllabus of the UK Central Council for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting, which was replaced in the late 1990s by diploma and degree-level Project 2000 training of the General Nursing Council. Using a reflective narrative approach to describe the lived experience of two qualified nurses, it compares, reviews and critiques both initiatives.

Findings

The author/researchers found both benefits and negatives inherent in each model. These were grouped into five key headings, which are a sense of belonging/identity; exposure to clinical practice; differences in training modality; development of clinical management skills and clinical preparedness; and academic merit. The older curriculum lacked an academic or research base, whereas the more recent approach encouraged and enhanced this element. However, with regard to preparing the clinician/registered nurse to feel confident in addressing a range of clinical and managerial challenges, the older style training seems to deliver better outcomes. They conclude that a move towards a “middle ground” between the two models may be of benefit to future RMN preparation.

Research limitations/implications

This study reports on the experience of two registered nurses. Therefore, the sample size is small. However, autoethnography is acknowledged as an effective means of delivering qualitative research; in addition, the authors access and use material from the wider literature to triangulate and critique their approach. This paper adds to the literature but also allows for duplication by others to further test the findings.

Practical implications

This type of study provides an opportunity for others to review, compare and contrast nursing or other multi-discipline changes in training/curriculum. The research method is one that is transferable and can be used within areas of practice, which have resource limitations. It provides an opportunity to replicate it in other services or jurisdictions.

Social implications

Nursing in the UK has experienced significant change over the past four decades. For RMNs, the move from hospitals into the community has been transformational. In addition, the influence of higher academic standards and the influence of the recent pandemic have challenged the profession and individuals within it. This study demonstrates positive and negative elements of the dilemma faced by nurses and offers a further contribution to this area.

Originality/value

There are a number of academic papers, media stories, statutory reports and guidance that explore the impact of changes within nurse training. This paper uses a first person autoethnographic study of the impact and effectiveness of these changes at a human level, the nurse on the ground. It uses the ward medicine keys as the vehicle to represent the huge responsibility that newly qualified nurses must face; this is not widely represented elsewhere in the literature!

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 May 2023

Ayesha Adeel, Chathurika Kannangara, Harnovdeep Singh Bharaj, Ambar Basu, Barrie Green, Lisa Ogilvie and Jerome Carson

Digital mental health interventions (DMHIs) are promising alternatives to traditional face-to-face psychological interventions to improve psychological outcomes in various chronic…

162

Abstract

Purpose

Digital mental health interventions (DMHIs) are promising alternatives to traditional face-to-face psychological interventions to improve psychological outcomes in various chronic health conditions. However, their efficacy among people with diabetes is yet to be established. Therefore, this narrative review aims to identify the importance and need for evidence-based research on DMHIs targeting the psychological outcomes in people with diabetes.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a narrative review approach, this study highlights the technological advancements in diabetes health care and identifies a need for developing DMHIs for people with diabetes.

Findings

DMHIs are promising for improving psychological outcomes in people with diabetes. However, there is a need for further rigorous, controlled and high-quality diabetes-focused studies, to make firm conclusions on the effectiveness and appropriateness of DMHIs for patients with diabetes. This review also suggests that DMHIs based on psychological theories and studies with higher quality methodologies are also needed.

Originality/value

This review highlights the contemporary literature on diabetes and related technological advancements. The findings of this study serve as a basis of the improvement of policy on digital mental health services for people with diabetes, to impact the global burden of the disease.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 April 2023

Barrie Green

This paper aims to describe a link between and benefits of two initiatives targeted at mental health and social inclusion. One being informal, the sport of walking football; the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe a link between and benefits of two initiatives targeted at mental health and social inclusion. One being informal, the sport of walking football; the other a formal self-help well-being group.

Design/methodology/approach

This reflective commentary describes two group activities which are aimed at addressing physical and mental health challenges of older adults. These are described by the author to highlight the benefits that they provide for some of the challenges faced by men in particular in later life. Using a narrative approach to describe a synergy between the two initiatives created by the link between the activities, and the participants.

Findings

The Lawnmower Maintenance Society has proved to be a successful model for promoting and supporting the participant’s mental health and well-being. As we emerge from the trauma of COVID-19 and the isolation of lockdown, such initiatives may help redress the imbalance in health which resulted. Although there are several similar groups, there seems to be a positive link between the physical and mental health benefits of using Walking Football as a shared interest of the attendees. Feedback from participants and interest from the wider community suggest the positive impact of such groups, particularly as National Health Service resources are stretched beyond capacity.

Research limitations/implications

Although this study reports on one new group for men, to the best of the author’s knowledge, this is the first to bring together the areas of Walking Football and a men’s support group.

Practical implications

This type of support group could easily be extended if the footballing authorities wish to replicate it in other parts of the country.

Social implications

It is well known that men are very reluctant to talk about personal problems. Other workers have also tried innovative solutions to this problem, such as Men in Sheds. This case study offers a further contribution to this area.

Originality/value

There are several academic papers, as well as information on well-being groups in both the print and social media. This commentary outlines a small, but contemporary, description of one such initiative.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2001

Barrie Green and Lynne Robinson

Records of violent incidents were retrospectively analysed to identify trends associated with violent incidents within an NHS medium secure psychiatric unit. Over a 12‐month…

Abstract

Records of violent incidents were retrospectively analysed to identify trends associated with violent incidents within an NHS medium secure psychiatric unit. Over a 12‐month period, 116 incident forms related to 112 incidents. These incidents were compared with a study from the previous 12 months within the same unit. Both studies were based upon work from within a high‐security setting (Caldwell and Naismith, 1989). There was a significant reduction in the overall number of violent incidents.The majority of incidents continued to occur within the intensive care admission unit. There continued to be a higher incidence of assaultive behaviour throughout the afternoon and evening. Seasonal variations demonstrates a reduction of incidents throughout the autumn and winter months compared with the previous year, and a significant change in the number of incidents that occurred during the summer.There remain opportunities for comparison with other secure units and further refinement of the methodology.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2007

Barrie Green and Simon Wood

In contemporary forensic mental health and learning disability services effective care and risk management, which is safe for individuals and the public, can only be delivered by…

Abstract

In contemporary forensic mental health and learning disability services effective care and risk management, which is safe for individuals and the public, can only be delivered by drawing upon differing perspectives and interventions. In practice uni‐disciplinary training abounds, but the authors found a lack of formal training inherently constructed to be multidisciplinary. Therefore, a course was developed, in conjunction with a university partner, to meet this need. This modular course is flexible in nature, but is normally delivered over one semester leading to certification. In addition, there is the option of either essay or portfolio submission providing access to credits toward other academic awards. This programme of study, ‘Professional Practice in Secure Environments’ was recently cited as an example of good practice in From Values to Action, the CNO review of mental health nursing (NIMHE, 2006). Modules begin from a foundation of theory and relate it intimately to practice; students develop an understanding of multidisciplinary working by both training together and training in each others' conceptual frameworks. Participants to date include those from health, criminal justice, and social care arenas, and those with no previous higher study have submitted essays. Evaluations are positive and are used to refine delivery and content. The authors conclude that the course demystifies practice and academia, and provides access to both. This is an integral part of the training strategy, which is directed to meeting current and future service needs.Current and future developments and expansion of forensic mental health provision into new types of service will be less effective without a move away from traditional educational approaches. Services to meet the specific needs of groups such as secure long‐stay and personality disorders cannot be sustained effectively without a parallel development of new types of training.The strategic thinking behind this course, practical obstacles encountered, and solutions developed are described in this paper.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 July 2023

Jerome Carson

165

Abstract

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2001

Norman McClelland, Graham Towl and David Crighton

Abstract

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Article
Publication date: 21 October 2019

Nina C. Cooper, Deepa Balachandran Nair, Sile Egan, Andrew Barrie and Bhathika Perera

Intellectual disability (ID) is prevalent in 1 per cent of the population. Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) affects up to 5 per cent of the general population of adult women…

Abstract

Purpose

Intellectual disability (ID) is prevalent in 1 per cent of the population. Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) affects up to 5 per cent of the general population of adult women. Identification of PMS is challenging in women with ID due to differences in communication. Management of PMS in the ID population requires careful consideration of baseline function, co-existing mental and physical health problems, drug interactions as well as complex ethical considerations. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Prospero-registered systematic review (CRD42019119398) of papers exploring the diagnosis and management of patients with PMS and ID (n=414). In total, 35 relevant titles were identified and 27 full text papers were assessed for eligibility, resulting in 10 studies for final qualitative analysis.

Findings

Ten original research papers were included. There are no standardised symptom criteria for diagnosis of PMS in women with ID. Studies relied on observer-reported data. All papers demonstrated higher rates of PMS in women with ID compared with the general adult population. Management was not standardised and varied between centres. Mainstays of treatment included non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, combined oral contraceptive pills and intramuscular progesterone. Newer evidence suggests levonorgestrel intrauterine systems may be appropriate. There was no quantitative method of establishing success of management.

Practical implications

A modified symptom diary should be used for diagnosis in this population. Differentiation between cyclical behavioural change due to pain vs mood disturbance remains challenging. Conservative, psychological and medical management should be the mainstay of treatment, with surgery considered in exceptional cases.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates the current limited evidence for the management of PMS in women with a diagnosis of ID and offers an overview of the current options for managing these patients’ symptoms.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 February 2020

Nicholas Morgan Geddes

This paper aims to propose that the socio-technical perspective is under-represented when appraising the adoption potential of renewable energy technologies (RETs) in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose that the socio-technical perspective is under-represented when appraising the adoption potential of renewable energy technologies (RETs) in late-industrialising countries and that this results in under-adoption. It also aims to identify a methodological approach that allows the socio-technical perspective to be integrated into management decision-making, alongside the more typical economic appraisal methodology.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study and novel mixed-methodology approach is used, which applies the diffusion of innovations framework, innovation system (IS) framework and system dynamics modelling (SDM) alongside traditional economic modelling and appraisal techniques. This approach is used to assess the adoption potential of solar photovoltaic (PV) and diesel water pumping systems in the wildlife conservation sector and surrounding rural communities in Kenya. The case study approach tests the merits of the mixed-methodology approach.

Findings

The life-cycle costs of solar PV water pumping systems are lower in nearly all financing and utilisation scenarios; offer additional social, technical and environmental benefits; and the conditions exist for greater adoption. The use of an integrated diffusion of innovations and IS framework generates significant qualitative data that can support management decision-making. The use of SDM techniques aid conceptualisation of the community economic, water and institutional systems into which water pumps may be diffused and provide a starting point for formal SDM simulation. The results suggest that these techniques capture the socio-technical perspective well and, when used alongside traditional project appraisal approaches, produce more complete information with which to support management decision-making.

Originality/value

This mixed-methodology approach could be used by practitioners to increase the diffusion and adoption of RETs in more complex contexts in late-industrialising countries. The emergent theory built through the case-study approach should be tested further to assess the merits of applying these techniques to support RET management decision-making in other contexts and more broadly.

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1974

Barrie Pettman

It is now ten years since the Industrial Training Act was placed on the statute book. Progress in this decade on the training front has been vast. However, continuous assessment…

Abstract

It is now ten years since the Industrial Training Act was placed on the statute book. Progress in this decade on the training front has been vast. However, continuous assessment and modifications have been made via the 1972 Green Paper the subsequent White Paper and Bill and, more recently, the Employment and Training Act, 1973.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 16 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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