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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2021

Xiao Chang, Xiaoliang Jia, Kuo Liu and Hao Hu

The purpose of this paper is to provide a knowledge-enabled digital twin for smart design (KDT-SD) of aircraft assembly line (AAL) to enhance the AAL efficiency…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a knowledge-enabled digital twin for smart design (KDT-SD) of aircraft assembly line (AAL) to enhance the AAL efficiency, performance and visibility. Modern AALs usually need to have capabilities such as digital-physical interaction and self-evaluation that brings significant challenges to traditional design method for AAL. The digital twin (DT) combining with reusable knowledge, as the key technologies in this framework, is introduced to promote the design process by configuring, understanding and evaluating design scheme.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed KDT-SD framework is designed with the introduction of DT and knowledge. First, dynamic design knowledge library (DDK-Lib) is established which could support the various activities of DT in the entire design process. Then, the knowledge-driven digital AAL modeling method is proposed. At last, knowledge-based smart evaluation is used to understand and identify the design flaws, which could further improvement of the design scheme.

Findings

By means of the KDT-SD framework proposed, it is possible to apply DT to reduce the complexity and discover design flaws in AAL design. Moreover, the knowledge equips DT with the capacities of rapid modeling and smart evaluation that improve design efficiency and quality.

Originality/value

The proposed KDT-SD framework can provide efficient design of AAL and evaluate the design performance in advance so that the feasibility of design scheme can be improved as much as possible.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

Ramazan Yaman

This study seeks to present a simple assembly line design and its balance for a low‐volume manufacturing company.

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to present a simple assembly line design and its balance for a low‐volume manufacturing company.

Design/methodology/approach

The study presents experiences with the design and implementation of a simple assembly line. The implementation concerns three aspects; design and construction of the assembly line, the assembly analysis of the product, and then balancing of the line. It also discusses construction and implementation difficulties of this tactical tool in the case company.

Findings

The study presents some outcomes from the design, implementation, and balancing of an assembly line for SMEs.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited by the case company and its experience.

Practical implications

This study is not pure theoretical study, it has application stages for industry, and it provides some real interface for the people from SMEs.

Originality/value

The approach has an original value in respect of implementation of assembly line for a small manufacturing company which has many limitations.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1984

S. Kähler

A paper presented at the Paris Assembly Automation conference dealt with a typical project concerning assembly automation of an LPG gas valve which had not been designed…

Abstract

A paper presented at the Paris Assembly Automation conference dealt with a typical project concerning assembly automation of an LPG gas valve which had not been designed for automatic assembly. A series of suggestions for design modifications were proposed with the purpose of simplifying assembly.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2007

Mozafar Saadat, Roy Sim and Farid Najafi

This paper aims to present a method for predicting dimensional variation in assembly processes of a wingbox structure concentrating on the assembly of skin panels to rib feet.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a method for predicting dimensional variation in assembly processes of a wingbox structure concentrating on the assembly of skin panels to rib feet.

Design/methodology/approach

Finite element modelling and experimental tests are conducted on the rib structure based on the site measurement gathered from the Airbus assembly factory.

Findings

The results have shown that the simulated model has the capability of predicting to an acceptable degree of accuracy the overall geometrical variations of the ribs and skin panels, as well as the positional variations of each individual rib foot.

Originality/value

The authors believe that no previous research has offered a similar prediction method for large aerostructures.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

R. Bäβler

THE increasing pressure of national and international competition is forcing firms to rationalise even further, especially in the field of assembly. In order to perform…

Abstract

THE increasing pressure of national and international competition is forcing firms to rationalise even further, especially in the field of assembly. In order to perform assembly tasks with the least possible expenditure of time, assembly facilities, space requirements and personnel, it has become necessary to include these objectives in the development stage of the product. Therefore, assembly‐oriented design now provides a good opportunity for rationalisation.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Peter Gröndahl and Mauro Onori

The Assembly Systems Unit at the Royal Institute of Technology and IVF Stockholm has developed several Flexible Automatic Assembly (FAA) cell solutions over the years…

Abstract

The Assembly Systems Unit at the Royal Institute of Technology and IVF Stockholm has developed several Flexible Automatic Assembly (FAA) cell solutions over the years (Mark I, Mark II, Mark IIF and Mark III). The industrial reality, however, clearly points out that the basic notions of flexibility must be extended and be enhanced without increasing the complexity. This has led our research team to revise the ideas and solutions available for manual and automatic assembly, resulting in the Hyper Flexible Automatic Assembly (HFAA) project. The paper describes the driving factors behind the needs and objectives for the HFAA project, as well as how it will present a standardised set of assembly process‐oriented system components. The paper also describes the new Mark IV application. This industrial HFAA system is being developed in order to test the concept’s industrial viability. The HFAA concept will allow the user to start from a manual assembly station and gradually add assembly equipment. The basic concepts of stepwise automation, standard assembly machine and sub‐batch principle emanate from our previous research.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Juhani Heilala and Paavo Voho

Market turbulence forces assembly plants to constantly adjust their production volume of products, variants and quantities. At the same time, assembly plant managers must…

Abstract

Market turbulence forces assembly plants to constantly adjust their production volume of products, variants and quantities. At the same time, assembly plant managers must protect long‐term investments in the flexible assembly system. For reconfigurability and agility the best solution is the modular semi‐automatic approach by combining flexible automation and human skills. It gives managers possibility to adjust volume by adding new modules or to automate the manual tasks step by step. The control of material handling and information flow in the agile assembly system is important. To keep flexibility, the combination of an intelligent pallet, i.e. use of escort memory, carrying a single product together with other hardware providing paperless production even supports a lot size of one. The article shows how to create flexible capability and capacity in the final assembly systems.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1982

B. Gondocs and T. Kovacs

To improve the flexibility of its assembly methods the Bakony Works in Hungary took out a manufacturing licence with Bosch. Some examples of where the system has been used…

Abstract

To improve the flexibility of its assembly methods the Bakony Works in Hungary took out a manufacturing licence with Bosch. Some examples of where the system has been used are described.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1986

B. Lotter

The dividing line between the sensible and efficient use of assembly robots and that of dedicated automatic assembly machines requires detailed planning.

Abstract

The dividing line between the sensible and efficient use of assembly robots and that of dedicated automatic assembly machines requires detailed planning.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1978

P.F. Rogers

As competition grows in the robot field and as more sophisticated applications emerge, it has become necessary to accurately predict robot cycle time. Especially in the…

Abstract

As competition grows in the robot field and as more sophisticated applications emerge, it has become necessary to accurately predict robot cycle time. Especially in the area of robot assembly applications, it is necessary to estimate times to balance multi‐arm systems and to economically compare robot assembly systems to alternate methods. Using the Unimate 6000 robot system as a model and manual time methods as a guide, a robot time and motion method is developed. Three time estimating methods are discussed starting with a simple, approximate one and finishing with a detailed, accurate one. All three methods can be adapted for use with applications other than assembly and will be further evaluated in the future with other robot systems.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

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