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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2010

Etlyn J. Kenny and Rob B. Briner

The purpose of this paper is to explore how ethnicity remains relevant to the workplace experience of minority ethnic graduate employees in contemporary British organizations.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how ethnicity remains relevant to the workplace experience of minority ethnic graduate employees in contemporary British organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative interviews were conducted with 30 British Black Caribbean graduate employees drawn from a range of public and private‐sector organizations to examine the ways in which they felt their ethnicity impacted on how they experienced their places of work. Template analysis was used to analyse the data.

Findings

The paper finds that racial discrimination, social class and ethnic identity were key elements of the way in which ethnicity was experienced by these minority ethnic graduate employees. The paper discusses the differing ways racial discrimination is experienced and conceptualized in contemporary British organizations; and highlights the ways in which social class may play a role in how a group of (largely) working class minority ethnic graduates progress their careers in (largely) middle class organizational environments. Presented for the first time is a theory on the key facets of the ways ethnic identity might be experienced at work.

Research limitations/implications

Further research would be required to see if the findings are replicated with graduates from other minority ethnic groups.

Practical implications

The paper provides insights into ways in which majority and minority ethnic employees may experience organizations differently.

Originality/value

This paper provides some new insights into the role of ethnicity at work. It also attempts to address some of the issues with organizational psychological research on ethnicity at work identified by Kenny and Briner.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Arthur A. Felts and Philip H. Jos

Examines the current attack on the legitimacy of the administrative state, and the question of how public administration should respond, in light of Weber’s account of…

Abstract

Examines the current attack on the legitimacy of the administrative state, and the question of how public administration should respond, in light of Weber’s account of bureaucratic domination. Finds in Weber a political theorist who rejects rather explicity the claim that bureaucracy can articulate and defend substantive values properly or wisely; one who provides an account of why administrators ‐ notwithstanding their considerable talents ‐ are an especially threatening participant in struggles over the ends of the state. Explores Weber’s account of the tension between political leadership and a system based increasingly on expertise and instrumental rationality. Explains how Weber’s analysis offers fresh insight into the current dilemma of public administration with respect to its role in governance and its search for professional status.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-252X

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Case study
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Susan Bosco and Diane M. Harvey

The saga of Market Basket took place over a period of months during which a significant upheaval occurred in the long-successful business. The turmoil drew in a broad…

Abstract

Synopsis

The saga of Market Basket took place over a period of months during which a significant upheaval occurred in the long-successful business. The turmoil drew in a broad range of stakeholders. In a rare chain of events, non-unionized workers and managers engineered a change in senior management of the company. Their willingness to sacrifice their livelihoods in support of one person exemplifies the impact that can be made by a single, authentic, leader. This case draws upon secondary sources which provide insight into broad panoply of business and organizational behavior issues. The primary focus of the case, however, is leadership.

Research methodology

This case was developed using secondary sources and court documents that reported on the events that precipitated the problems at Market Basket as well as the strike and aftermath.

Relevant courses and levels

Management principles, organizational behavior. All undergraduate class levels would be appropriate.

Theoretical bases

This case exemplifies these three major theories in a real-life situation: stakeholder theory, corporate culture theory, organizational commitment.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1995

Reproduces the three winning entries in the Scottish schools essaycompetition. Entrants were asked to choose a character from a book andto write about what that character…

Abstract

Reproduces the three winning entries in the Scottish schools essay competition. Entrants were asked to choose a character from a book and to write about what that character means to them.

Details

Library Review, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Rocco R. Vanasco

The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) of 1977 and its amendment – the Trade and Competitive Act of 1988 – are unique not only in the history of the accounting and…

Abstract

The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) of 1977 and its amendment – the Trade and Competitive Act of 1988 – are unique not only in the history of the accounting and auditing profession, but also in international law. The Acts raised awareness of the need for efficient and adequate internal control systems to prevent illegal acts such as the bribery of foreign officials, political parties and governments to secure or maintain contracts overseas. Its uniqueness is also due to the fact that the USA is the first country to pioneer such a legislation that impacted foreign trade, international law and codes of ethics. The research traces the history of the FCPA before and after its enactment, the role played by the various branches of the United States Government – Congress, Department of Justice, Securities Exchange commission (SEC), Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS); the contributions made by professional associations such as the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICFA), the Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA), the American Bar Association (ABA); and, finally, the role played by various international organizations such as the United Nations (UN), the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the World Trade Organization (WTO) and the International Federation of Accountants (IFAC). A cultural, ethical and legalistic background will give a better understanding of the FCPA as wll as the rationale for its controversy.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 14 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2018

Dianne Thurab-Nkhosi, Gwendoline Williams and Maria Mason-Roberts

The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which student assessments used in two capstone courses in a Master’s in Human Resource Management (HRM) Program were…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which student assessments used in two capstone courses in a Master’s in Human Resource Management (HRM) Program were authentic, and encouraged confidence in competencies identified.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was taken to evaluate the perception of lecturers, clients and students regarding authenticity of assessments and the competencies achieved. The authors used a five-dimensional framework for authentic assessment developed by Gulikers et al. (2004) as a basis for an online survey of the students and focus group, reflection of the client and for self-reporting their reflections.

Findings

It was found that the assessments in the two courses were aligned with the five criteria of the framework for defining authentic assessments developed by Gulikers et al. (2004), however, there were challenges noted by the students and clients. Students reported attaining some of the competencies identified in the HRM graduate competency profile but needing reinforcement for more confidence. While the students felt that they benefitted, one major challenge of the authentic assessments was the heavy workload.

Practical implications

Graduate programs in HRM may be producing students without the relevant competencies and the confidence to perform, partly because approaches to teaching and learning and in particular design of assessments may not be sufficiently practical. The findings of this study can provide support for more authentic assessments in professional business education programs.

Originality/value

Few cases studies exist on application of authentic assessments to mastery of competencies in developing countries. This contributes to the discussion on competency-based education and authentic learning, with particular reference to developing country contexts.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 37 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Julia Yates and Sarah Skinner

Existing research has established that women drop out of engineering careers in part because of a dissatisfaction with their career development, but women's understanding…

Abstract

Purpose

Existing research has established that women drop out of engineering careers in part because of a dissatisfaction with their career development, but women's understanding of career development in engineering has been as yet largely unexplored. This paper aims to explore female engineers' experiences of navigating their careers and their perceptions of barriers to career development, through the lens of the intelligent career framework (ICF).

Design/methodology/approach

The in-depth interviews of this study were conducted with female engineers in the UK and analysed using template analysis.

Findings

The authors identified three structural barriers that participants felt hinder women's career development in engineering: (1) promotions are more likely to be given to people who are widely known – more often men; (2) promotions are more likely to be given to people on whom high status is conferred in this context – more often men and (3) promotions are more likely to be given to people who conform to the ideal worker ideology – more often men. The women also offered a series of counter-narratives in which they reframed the behaviour they witnessed as something other than sexism.

Originality/value

The findings highlight the significant and systemic bias against women's career development through gender stereotypes in workplaces and an implicitly gendered organisation that hinders the development of the three competencies needed for career advancement. The authors describe a range of counter-narratives that the participants use to help them to make sense of their experiences. Finally, the authors illustrate the application of the intelligent career framework (ICF) as a lens to view the career development culture of an organisation.

Details

Career Development International, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Nick Ellis

A postmodernist look at the position of marketing at the turn of the millennium. Devises a dream‐like conversation between four professionals (a doctor, a lawyer, an

Abstract

A postmodernist look at the position of marketing at the turn of the millennium. Devises a dream‐like conversation between four professionals (a doctor, a lawyer, an accountant and a marketer). Each representative defends the status of the profession, with the focus on the marketer. Considers the opinion of others of the role of the marketer and reflects on its development and obstacles to development.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1997

Gerald Vinten, David A. Lane and Nicky Hayes

There can be no doubt that the small and medium sized enterprise (SME) plays a pivotal role in most if not all economies, and that social policy makers have an interest in…

Abstract

There can be no doubt that the small and medium sized enterprise (SME) plays a pivotal role in most if not all economies, and that social policy makers have an interest in ensuring the viability of this sector of the economy, which plays a crucial role in the contract culture of national and international competitiveness. Quite apart from the essential symbiosis between the large multinationals and public limited companies and this sector, the sustainability of unemployment benefit payouts would be jeopardised should the sector experience a significant downturn. There are already worldwide concerns about the ability to continue to finance state pensions at anything like the present scale, and any loss of viability of the SME sector will simply exacerbate this situation. There are also useful reciprocations to be achieved by comparisons across sectors, including in significant areas such as internal control (Vinten, Lane, Hayes, 1996). The recent flurry of activity has included initiatives of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of England and Wales 1996) and the information needs of owners (Institute of Chartered Accountants of England and Wales 1996a), an Auditing Practices Board (1996) Practice Note, and a Department of Trade and Industry Consultation Document (DTI 1996).

Details

Management Research News, vol. 20 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2008

Louis Beaubien

This paper aims to discuss the concepts contained in communities of practice theory (COPT) and how they might contribute to greater understanding of organizations.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the concepts contained in communities of practice theory (COPT) and how they might contribute to greater understanding of organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws upon COPT as a means to broaden the perspective of institutional theory.

Findings

The findings provide insight into the processes surrounding organizational change. The notion of change as both intentional actions and unintended consequences is explored through a review of the case of Arthur Andersen and Company.

Research limitations/implications

The study presents a historically informed case study that presents a novel theoretical approach for examinations of behavior, practices and ethics in organizations. Future work based on broader empirical examinations would enrich the findings presented in this study.

Practical implications

The study provides a means to examine organizations in practice and expands awareness of how behaviors in organizations evolve and might be shaped and encouraged over time.

Originality/value

The study introduces a novel theoretical vocabulary to the accounting academy COPT that has the potential to expand our understanding of organizations through examinations of practice.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

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