Search results

1 – 10 of 113
Book part
Publication date: 25 January 2013

Anne Nortcliffe and Andrew Middleton

Research into the autonomous use of MP3 audio recorders by students in UK higher education demonstrated that students were innovative in their autonomous use of the devices. They…

Abstract

Research into the autonomous use of MP3 audio recorders by students in UK higher education demonstrated that students were innovative in their autonomous use of the devices. They used them to capture learning conversations from formal and informal situations to personalise and enhance their learning. However, today smartphones and other smart devices have replaced the necessity for students to carry multiple mobile devices including MP3 recorders. This chapter builds upon the earlier work and presents a small qualitative study into how students are autonomously using their smart devices to support their learning. The research explores the hypothesis that students are being innovative in the ways in which they are using their smart devices to support their formal and informal learning. The study involved five students who own smart devices who were invited to discuss their ownership of smartphone and tablet technologies and the ways they used them in their studies. The students first completed a short questionnaire and were then interviewed in small groups. The results agree with previous research into student use of smart devices and describe autonomous engagement facilitated by personally owned smart technologies. The study identifies continuous patterns of pervasive engagement by students and concludes that more thought should be given to disruptive innovation, digital literacy and employability.

Details

Increasing Student Engagement and Retention Using Mobile Applications: Smartphones, Skype and Texting Technologies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-509-8

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Anne Middleton

To provide a possible methodology by which the quality of student bibliographies can be measured.

Abstract

Purpose

To provide a possible methodology by which the quality of student bibliographies can be measured.

Design/methodology/approach

The citations in some undergraduate business student bibliographies were categorised by resource type which were designated as either “scholarly” or “non‐scholarly”. A ratio of scholarly/non‐scholarly references – the “scholarly index”, was calculated for each bibliography as an indication of its quality.

Findings

The scholarly index did allow differences in bibliography quality to be detected between the different module assignments that were examined.

Research limitations/implications

There are a number of variables affecting the quality of student bibliographies including the library. As a measurement of library impact student bibliography quality has a limited value unless library factors can be isolated from other variables.

Originality/value

This methodology and the scholarly index, could be employed where it is required to assess or compare the quality of student bibliographies.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Linda Banwell

236

Abstract

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Book part
Publication date: 17 January 2023

Øystein Jensen, Hyangmi Kim and Joseph S. Chen

The aim of this chapter is to delineate a product framework concerning managed visitor attractions (MVA), which highlights the supply-chain aspects of destinations. It first…

Abstract

The aim of this chapter is to delineate a product framework concerning managed visitor attractions (MVA), which highlights the supply-chain aspects of destinations. It first touches on the rationales for developing such a framework and then constructs a framework composed of a set of product components deriving from the extant literature. Consequently, an version of a product component framework, fastening on an accumulated sample of attraction cases, is presented through three illustrative cases. In the conclusion section, this study elaborates on the study limitation while connoting how the resultant data could shed light on the role of the components of the MVA product in the creation of visitor experiences.

Article
Publication date: 17 September 2009

Anne Edwards

This article focuses on the conditions that are conducive to effective work on reducing children's vulnerability to social exclusion. It draws on three studies of practitioners…

Abstract

This article focuses on the conditions that are conducive to effective work on reducing children's vulnerability to social exclusion. It draws on three studies of practitioners who are collaborating to prevent the social exclusion of children and young people. Two ideas are discussed: distributed expertise and relational agency. Distributed expertise recognises that expertise is distributed across local systems and that practitioners need to become adept at recognising, drawing on and contributing to it. Relational agency offers a finer‐grained analysis of what is involved in working in systems of distributed expertise. Findings include the need for professionals to develop relational agency as an extra layer of expertise alongside their core professional expertise and a concern that interprofessional work may result in seeing clients as tasks to be worked on rather than people to be worked with relationally. Implications for training and professional development are outlined.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1971

IT IS EASY to make glib generalisations about the student situation in this country, and its associated problems, but a recondite analysis of student mores is much more difficult…

45

Abstract

IT IS EASY to make glib generalisations about the student situation in this country, and its associated problems, but a recondite analysis of student mores is much more difficult. Commentators tend to be extreme, varying from those who declaim ‘All for youth and the world well lost’ to those crying ‘Stop their grants, make them do a day's work’, and more in similar vein. An understanding of student attitudes to work and society is one thing, the cause and effect of their attitudes is quite another. What is certain is that there has been a radical change, and the full effects of this change are yet to be felt. Behind each new generation rise those ever ready to decry the follies of youth, but today there is a widespread and differing view held that youth is king, and can do no wrong. Both of these points of view are extreme, and both, in totality, are unjustified.

Details

New Library World, vol. 72 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Anne Edwards

The paper focuses on preventative services for children, young people and families. It argues that client‐led service provision calls for flexibility from service providers, using…

1155

Abstract

The paper focuses on preventative services for children, young people and families. It argues that client‐led service provision calls for flexibility from service providers, using the distributed expertise to be found across the professions involved and a high degree of interprofessional trust. All this, in turn, requires a systemic response from the major agencies if they are to support this new professionalism.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Anne de Looy, Anastasia Markaki, Sofie Joossens, Aspasia Spyridaki and Vasiliki Chatzi

– The aim of this study is to describe placement learning opportunities for student dietitians related to future fields of work.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to describe placement learning opportunities for student dietitians related to future fields of work.

Design/methodology/approach

An online questionnaire determined the variety and duration of pre-qualifying practice placements across Europe. Responses from members of the Thematic Network DIETS2 in Europe (n = 39) were analysed.

Findings

A response rate of 61 per cent from 19 countries (39 higher education institutions or national dietetic associations) is reported. Four sub-types of placement are used by the respondents for pre-qualifying dietetic students. Placements are in public health, education and social care (28 per cent); clinical (27 per cent); catering (20 per cent) and others (25 per cent), including the food industry. Median number of weeks in the location was 12 for clinical settings; 5 for health, education and social care; 4.5 for in catering and up to 7 weeks in other locations.

Research limitations/implications

If dietitians and nutritionists are to contribute fully to Health 2020 and Europe 2020 agendas for improving the health of the workforce, which is fundamental to improve productivity and lessen absenteeism, then alerting them to diverse strategies and practical implementation as seen in practice is highly important. Developing competence, brought about by engaging in a diversity of practice-based learning, would enable dietitians to meet multidisciplinary and multidimensional roles required to improve European nutritional health.

Practical implications

Clear learning outcomes and competence statements are critical for guiding practice-based learning.

Originality/value

The diversity of locations of placements needs to be promoted and exploited by higher education for health improvement.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 45 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 February 2009

Steven D. Brown, Harry Daniels, Anne Edwards, Jane Leadbetter, Deirdre Martin, David Middleton, Paul Warmington, Apostol Apostolov and Anna Popova

The purpose of this paper is to describe the problem of achieving “organizational justice” for children within integrated children's services. Justice is understood, following…

469

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the problem of achieving “organizational justice” for children within integrated children's services. Justice is understood, following Byers and Rhodes discussion of Levinas as respecting the “unique and indivisible” character of a given child.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical material reported here is drawn from a large study of interagency working in children's services in the UK. Data are taken from Developmental Work Research sessions. Methodological details are outlined in Daniels et al. and Leadbetter et al.

Findings

The key finding discussed here is that in order to balance the outcome measures used in children's services, participants use a further abstraction “the outcome of improved outcomes”. The logical and practical consequences of this abstraction are analysed.

Originality/value

The paper offers an empirically grounded contribution to conceptual debates about otherness and ethics in organization. In particular, it argues that a concern for the other need not preclude a high level of concrete categorization and minute target setting. The philosophical debate is seen to be “resolved” in practice.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1949

It has often been said that a great part of the strength of Aslib lies in the fact that it brings together those whose experience has been gained in many widely differing fields…

Abstract

It has often been said that a great part of the strength of Aslib lies in the fact that it brings together those whose experience has been gained in many widely differing fields but who have a common interest in the means by which information may be collected and disseminated to the greatest advantage. Lists of its members have, therefore, a more than ordinary value since they present, in miniature, a cross‐section of institutions and individuals who share this special interest.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

1 – 10 of 113