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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2011

Anne Jasman and Peter McIlveen

The purpose of this paper is to open up the question of how we prepare people to be resilient, flexible and capable of managing the uncertainties and complexities of the

2071

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to open up the question of how we prepare people to be resilient, flexible and capable of managing the uncertainties and complexities of the twenty‐first century by using both futures studies and complexity theory as a backdrop for a discussion of career education and teacher education in the future.

Design/methodology/approach

Recent developments in the work of others in futures studies and complexity theory are presented. These developments provide a framework for discussing current understandings of career and teacher education and to explore the possible trajectories for supporting learning to, in and through work across the lifespan.

Findings

Through applying futures studies and complexity theory to career and teacher education the authors conclude that these conceptual frameworks have much to offer practitioners and policy makers in the fields of career education and teacher education, and that theory development in these fields is already embracing the conceptual tools within these areas of study.

Practical implications

Suggestions are made for what will be needed in the future and how educational organisations will have to adapt in order to promote resilience and flexibility in the face of the uncertainty and complexity of learning and work in the twenty‐first century.

Originality/value

This paper brings together four distinct areas of research and scholarship – i.e. complexity theory, futures studies, career and teacher education – in order to explore possible and desirable trajectories for supporting learning to, in and through work across the lifespan.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 January 2012

Eddie Blass, Anne Jasman and Roger Levy

The purpose of this paper is to share the reflections of a group of five academics who started supervising practice‐based doctoral students at a similar time in the same…

1070

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to share the reflections of a group of five academics who started supervising practice‐based doctoral students at a similar time in the same institution.

Design/methodology/approach

The supervisors engaged in a collaborative research process themselves, exploring their supervision practices, due in part to the relatively limited literature available in the field, and in part as a support mechanism to help them understand what they were doing.

Findings

As the first students have now completed, the learning from taking students through the cycle from start to finish for the first time is also now complete in itself. While the supervisors continue to learn both from and within the supervision process itself, that initial experience of supervising doctoral students is now complete and in many ways the doctoral development process of the students themselves.

Originality/value

This paper offers insight into the doctoral development process from the supervisor's perspective, and offers reflections on the supervision process itself, as well as insight into the difficulties that can be encountered when researching your own practice.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 27 January 2012

Pamela Green and John Bowden

327

Abstract

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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