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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Ann J. Grafstein

41

Abstract

Details

Electronic Resources Review, vol. 4 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1364-5137

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Ann J. Grafstein

135

Abstract

Details

Electronic Resources Review, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1364-5137

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Tricia Jane Bingham, Josie Wirjapranata and Shirley-Ann Chinnery

This paper outlines a teaching and learning collaboration between information literacy (IL) professionals and a social work academic at The University of Auckland. The…

1205

Abstract

Purpose

This paper outlines a teaching and learning collaboration between information literacy (IL) professionals and a social work academic at The University of Auckland. The collaboration was developed for the purpose of introducing evidence-based practice (EBP) and related IL skills to a third-year social work cohort preparing for their first practicum. Embedding the research–practice connection in the minds of students at this level of study is essential, as using evidence in practice is considered to be a fundamental professional objective. Despite this perspective, it is not uncommon for research to be viewed as an ancillary, if not discretionary skill in social work, with the research–practice gap well recognised in the social work literature. EBP offers students a clearly defined, systematic research framework imminently suited to the novice learner which emphasises the importance of research for practice. Research skills, in particular IL and the ability to find, evaluate and apply information, are essential to the development of effective EBP. Apart from the practical skills of being able to find evidence, critical thinking and reflective skills are key skills also inherent to IL processes and practice, and mastery of the evidence-based approach is impossible without mastery of these key IL competencies. Taking a solution-focused frame, theoretically underpinned by a constructivist teaching philosophy, we detail specific EBP and IL teaching practices, challenges and the remedies applied. The paper concludes with key lessons learned and future directions for teaching EBP and IL skills to social work students at The University of Auckland.

Design/methodology/approach

A solution-focused frame is theoretically underpinned by a constructivist teaching philosophy.

Findings

This paper offers insights derived from seven years of teaching EBP and IL skills to social work students and investigates specific teaching challenges and details the remedies applied.

Research limitations/implications

As a case study, this article deals with one instance of EBP and IL teaching. Focusing specifically on EBP in the social sciences, this may not be relevant for other disciplines.

Practical implications

This paper offers insights into methods for merging EBP and IL skills teaching in the social sciences, providing practical examples of activities which can be used in teaching, underpinned by relevant theory.

Social implications

To be effective practitioners, social workers must understand the importance of research to practice, in particular how this can improve their professional knowledge and practice. Forging the research–practice connection aids the development of competent practitioners and enhances the well-being of social work clients.

Originality/value

The authors outline constructivist–connectivist learning activities that can be used to advance students’ IL skills, develop research capacity and enhance the importance of the research-practice connection in social work practice. While much research has been done on EBP and IL connections in the medical and nursing literature, there is limited literature discussing EBP and IL integration in social work.

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Patricia Layzell Ward

Reviews the general literature of management relevant to the information and library professions, and that of the management of information, knowledge‐based and library…

6397

Abstract

Reviews the general literature of management relevant to the information and library professions, and that of the management of information, knowledge‐based and library services published in 2002. Themes emerging at major conferences are noted and issues of growing concern are identified.

Details

Library Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

James K. Elmborg

Points out the similarities and differences between library instruction and writing instruction in the higher education curriculum. Notes that information literacy…

3526

Abstract

Points out the similarities and differences between library instruction and writing instruction in the higher education curriculum. Notes that information literacy librarians can learn from the experiences of composition instructors regarding curricular revision and reform. Suggests that one of the keys to information literacy reaching its potential is to find common ground with programs like Writing across the Curriculum.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Janneka L. Guise

To develop a method of systematically analyzing reference and instruction programmes at academic libraries so managers of such services can identify potential areas of…

1130

Abstract

Purpose

To develop a method of systematically analyzing reference and instruction programmes at academic libraries so managers of such services can identify potential areas of change and make more confident recommendations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the library literature and then introduces a template for programme analysis. A case study is used to help illustrate the need for programme analysis, and also to clarify the template.

Findings

The reference and instruction literature on assessment and new service models indicates that academic librarians are struggling to update programming in order to meet the needs of current library patrons. There is no how‐to manual for managers of reference and instruction departments to analyze their services comprehensively and to decide what changes to make. This paper introduces a template that academic librarians could use to systematically analyze their reference and instruction programming with regard to the history of the programmes, internal and external environmental factors that affect the provision of service, and how the current service model compares with others.

Practical implications

The use of this template will allow academic librarians at any size library to investigate the historical and environmental factors that affect their services, so they can more confidently identify potential areas of change and make documented and supported recommendations to library administration.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils a gap in the literature and offers a guide to programme analysis for managers of reference and instruction departments.

Details

New Library World, vol. 106 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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