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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Karin Newman, Tanya Pyne and Alan Cowling

Uses an empirical investigation based on a survey of junior doctors in five NHS trust hospitals, to examine their attitudes towards both the general principle of clinical…

2593

Abstract

Uses an empirical investigation based on a survey of junior doctors in five NHS trust hospitals, to examine their attitudes towards both the general principle of clinical involvement in hospital management and the particular prospect of exercising such a role themselves. Finds that junior doctors, with few exceptions and irrespective of grade, were very positive towards clinical management roles in NHS trusts and were almost universally keen to assume management responsibilities when they were more senior. At the same time, finds junior doctors to have little concept of the doctor‐ manager role or the recognized and demanded specific preparation for assuming management responsibilities.

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Health Manpower Management, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-2065

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Alan Cowling and Mike Walters

To what extent have personnel managersrecaptured their enthusiasm for manpowerplanning, especially recruitment planning, in thelight of projected demographic change in the1990s? A…

Abstract

To what extent have personnel managers recaptured their enthusiasm for manpower planning, especially recruitment planning, in the light of projected demographic change in the 1990s? A survey conducted on behalf of the Institute of Personnel Management explores the issue. Its findings are presented and reviewed in the context of the general state of the art at the present time. Although in the private sector a number of major initiatives have been successfully launched in such areas as training and development and competitive restructuring, other areas of manpower planning find only limited support, and the public sector lags behind the rest of the field. There exist a few examples of comprehensive and systematic manpower planning.

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Personnel Review, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

Karin Newman and Alan Cowling

Based on a national evaluation of a £2 millionGovernment‐sponsored programme to send some 260 consultants from the 14Regional Health Authorities in England to attend Business…

Abstract

Based on a national evaluation of a £2 million Government‐sponsored programme to send some 260 consultants from the 14 Regional Health Authorities in England to attend Business School management programmes during 1992‐3. Reports on a 20‐month tracking study to assess changes in the level and breadth of knowledge, attitudes and behaviour as acknowledged by course participants, their UGMs, line managers and where possible their chief executives. Over 2,000 course participants were interviewed and some 106 completed both pre‐ and post‐course attendance “self‐efficacy” questionnaires. Most consultants emerged from the courses feeling more confident to handle their current and prospective management roles and the tangible returns to the organization suggest that advanced management development should continue for consultants being appointed to senior management roles such as clinical and medical directors.

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Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1998

Karin Newman, Alan Cowling and Susan Leigh

Features a case study of a major bank which aimed to achieve corporate transformation and a dramatic improvement in service quality. The links between service quality, customer…

4439

Abstract

Features a case study of a major bank which aimed to achieve corporate transformation and a dramatic improvement in service quality. The links between service quality, customer satisfaction and corporate profitability in UK banking are outlined in order to set in context the many quality improvement initiatives undertaken by UK retail banks in recent years. Business process re‐engineering has proved to be the most popular of service quality initiatives but most have been limited to single processes rather than corporate transformation as portrayed in the case study. The five‐year corporate transformation programme focuses on employee communications, the redesign of work, recruitment and reward processes and the introduction of consumer research‐based national quality standards. The bank was rewarded for its efforts, coming top for three consecutive years in the Which? service quality surveys and, according to its own data, which contributed to a rise in customer satisfaction and customer retention at a time of declining employee satisfaction. Future developments in service quality segmentation and a working definition of service quality are proposed.

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International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1985

Alan Cowling and Alastair Evans

Whilst it is generally accepted that the way in which an organisation, particularly a large organisation, is designed can and does have a major influence on its operation and…

Abstract

Whilst it is generally accepted that the way in which an organisation, particularly a large organisation, is designed can and does have a major influence on its operation and efficiency, there is little evidence that the design and restructuring of organisations is tackled in a systematic fashion in the United Kingdom. It is also far from clear whether personnel departments can and do play a major role in this process. This article presents the findings of an investigation by a project team set up by the National Committee for Organisation and Manpower Planning of the Institute of Personnel Management to examine this subject, in the context of relevant contemporary theory and practice.

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Personnel Review, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1999

Alan Cowling, Karin Newman and Susie Leigh

This paper focuses on the practice of evidence‐based healthcare by doctors, nurses, midwives and the professions allied to medicine in four NHS Trusts in and around London. This…

3681

Abstract

This paper focuses on the practice of evidence‐based healthcare by doctors, nurses, midwives and the professions allied to medicine in four NHS Trusts in and around London. This qualitative study, based on interviews and self‐efficiency ratings uncovered the extent of evidence based practice between different groups and between acute and community Trusts, the perceived obstacles to the adoption and implementation of EBHC, and throws light on the knowledge, skills and attitudes required for such practice. Five clusters of competencies were identified – personal attributes, interpersonal, self‐management, information management and technical knowledge skills – and these form the basis of a competency framework of measurable criteria to assess proficiency as well as staff training needs which it is hoped will enable NHS Trusts to devise strategies to meet the requirements and challenges of clinical governance from April 1999.

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International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Karin Newman, Tanya Pyne and Alan Cowling

This paper proposes a diagnostic framework useful to Trust managers who are faced with the task of devising and implementing strategies for improvements in clinical effectiveness…

Abstract

This paper proposes a diagnostic framework useful to Trust managers who are faced with the task of devising and implementing strategies for improvements in clinical effectiveness, and is based on a recent study incorporating clinicians, managers, and professional staff in four NHS Trusts in the North Thames Region. The gap framework is inspired by the gap model developed by Zeithaml, Parasuraman and Berry from their research into service quality and incorporates Dave Sackett’s schema as well as a personal competency profile needed for the practice of evidence based health‐care (EBHC). The paper highlights the four organisational and personal failures (gaps) which contribute to the fifth gap, namely the discrepancy between clinically relevant research evidence and its implement‐ation in health care. To close the gaps, Trusts need to set the goal and tackle the cultural, organisational, attitudinal and more material aspects such as investment in the information infrastructure, education and training of doctors. Doctors need to go through a process from awareness to action facilitated through a combination of personal and organisational incentives and rewards as well as training in the requisite skills. Researchers should take steps to improve the quality of the evidence and its accessibility and purchasers should reinforce the use of EBHC by withdrawing funding for care which has proved to be ineffective, inappropriate or inferior.

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Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1996

Karin Newman and Alan Cowling

Presents an empirical study of major quality improvement initiatives recently undertaken by two British banks. Provides a useful comparison of the two different approaches, and…

4243

Abstract

Presents an empirical study of major quality improvement initiatives recently undertaken by two British banks. Provides a useful comparison of the two different approaches, and contributes new evidence on the current debate concerning the validity of the SERVQUAL model. First outlines the implementation of the SERVQUAL model, the bank’s subsequent quality improvement programme, and evidence of an improvement in customer satisfaction. Second, included for comparative purposes, describes the adoption and implementation of the Crosby total quality training programme. In both cases relevant evidence was gathered on staff attitudes. Given the long‐term nature of these comprehensive quality programmes, any evaluation must necessarily be tentative, but both banks are able to report an improvement in service quality, and fresh evidence is provided in support of the SERVQUAL model.

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International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1995

Alan Cowling and Karin Newman

Total quality management (TQM) principles are now being applied inservice industries in the UK, following their perceived success inmanufacturing industries, with the particular…

3752

Abstract

Total quality management (TQM) principles are now being applied in service industries in the UK, following their perceived success in manufacturing industries, with the particular aim of improving service quality. In financial services the impetus behind the adoption of quality programmes is increased competition and higher customer expectations. Studies of the introduction of quality programmes into service organizations in the UK are as yet few, but both these and the large number of studies of TQM in manufacturing point to the need for high levels of motivation and involvement by staff, and the significance of job satisfaction and of employment policies. Reports on an investigation into the introduction of TQM into two major banks in the UK, with a special focus on the reactions of employees. Highlights their success and limitations in two case studies, and draws out the lessons to be learned by senior management and human resources departments.

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Personnel Review, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Rachid Zeffane and Geoffrey Mayo

In recent years, organisations around the world have been seriously affected by a range of economic, political and social upheavals that have gathered momentum in most parts of…

180

Abstract

In recent years, organisations around the world have been seriously affected by a range of economic, political and social upheavals that have gathered momentum in most parts of the globe. The viability of the conventional (pyramidal) organisational structures is being challenged in conjunction with major shifts in the roles of mid and top managers. In many countries, the pace of the above socio‐economic events and uncertainties is happening at an unprecedented pace. Some markets are showing signs of potential gigantic expansions while others (historically prosperous) are on the verge of complete collapse (Dent, 1991). In responding to the socio‐economic challenges of the nineties, organisations (across the board) have resorted to dismantling the conventional pyramidal structure and adopting so‐called “leaner” structures (see Zeffane, 1992). The most common struggle has been to maintain market share in an economic environment increasingly characterised by excess labour supply (Bamber, 1990; Green & Macdonald, 1991). As organisations shifted their strategies from “mass production” to “post‐fordism” (see, for example Kern and Schumann, 1987), there has been a significant tendency to emphasise flexibility of both capital and labour in order to cater for the niche markets which are claimed to be rapidly emerging, world‐wide. This has resulted in massive organisational restructuring world‐wide.

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International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 14 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

1 – 10 of 74