International Financial Markets: Volume 13

Cover of International Financial Markets
Subject:

Table of contents

(17 chapters)
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About the Editors

Pages vii-viii
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Preface

Page xv
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Abstract

In this chapter, we apply the new measure of speculative activities (hereafter, named the speculative ratio) in Chan, Nguyen, and Chan (2013) to study the relationship between those activities and volatility in the oil futures market. We document that the speculative ratio (trading volume divided by open interest) can isolate speculative elements from total trading activities. Using the oil futures data and dividing the data into two subperiods surrounding Hurricane Katrina, we find an increased speculative trades in the post-Hurricane Katrina period. Our results show that speculative activities create a more volatile oil futures market and they lower the information flow between volatility and speculative activities in the post-Hurricane Katrina period.

Abstract

This study explores the price linkage between the Chinese commodity futures market and other dominant futures markets, and examines the forces behind the price linkages. The contribution by the trading hour innovations in the United States (or United Kingdom) market to the overnight price changes in the Chinese market is larger in scale than the contribution by the daytime information from the Chinese market to the overnight returns of the corresponding US (or UK) market. Several futures have significant interactions of the domestic and foreign factors in the price linkages while the Chinese domestic factors explain better the global market price linkage in some futures (aluminum, gold, and corn), demonstrating the leading role of the Chinese futures markets in these world markets.

Abstract

This chapter provides a review of the Chinese government policies that promote the internationalization of the Chinese currency, the renminbi or RMB, which include the RMB swap arrangements between the central banks, trading of the RMB across different markets, and establishment of the dim sum bond market. In particular, we update the development of the dim sum bond market in terms of the size, amount of the issues, coupon and tenor characteristics, issuers, and investment bankers of dim sum bond issues. The dim sum bond market appears to be a promising global asset class for investors.

Abstract

The real estate market has evolved significantly over the past 10 years and has experienced rapid growth throughout the world in its various forms. Many emerging countries witnessed the significant growth in their commercial real estate markets that became a stable sector of their economies. These countries, after developing a reliable commercial real estate base within their economies subsequently developed real estate financial markets. The growth of the real estate investment trusts, REITs, markets in many countries within the past decade helped attract global capital that facilitated additional investments in local real estate developments. Significantly, this period of time may have witnessed a higher degree of integration of real estate with the broader financial markets due in large part to the securitization of mortgages. Yet the general real estate market was also impacted in many parts of the world with rising prices and subsequent price collapses. This section focuses on the various areas of the global real estate market and the changes that it has encountered as examined by researchers of real estate. This chapter also examines the recent trends in global real estate markets and explores how these changes have affected the broader investment community.

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Abstract

This chapter provides a comprehensive overview of the young, but rapidly growing sovereign credit default swap (CDS) market, describes the function, trading, history, market participants, key statistical and stylized facts about CDS prices, determinants, price discovery, and risk issues.

Abstract

The study examines the joint effect of sovereign and call risks on the duration of callable sovereign bonds over the period 1996–2011. The results indicate that the sovereign risk-adjusted duration is significantly shorter than its Macaulay counterpart for U.S. dollar-denominated investment-grade callable sovereign bonds. Further, the “shortening” effect of sovereign and call risks on duration is generally stronger among bonds of lower ratings. Similar results are obtained when CDS prices are used as a proxy for changes in sovereign risk. Results from this study emphasize the importance of considering the joint effect of sovereign and call risks in managing the interest rate risk exposure in fixed income investments.

Abstract

Previous research suggests that monthly commodity futures returns are like equity returns and recommend long-only portfolio positions. A follow-up question is whether the distributions of daily returns on commodity futures are fat-tailed, just like equity returns. This question has important implication for commodity futures traders because futures trade positions are marked to the market daily. The Extreme Value Theory (EVT) is used to test whether the distributions of the commodity futures returns are fat-tailed with finite variance. The results suggest that not all commodity futures returns have a fat-tail distribution and the tails of the distributions of commodity futures returns generally are smaller than the tails of the distribution of equity returns.

Abstract

This chapter examines the increased levels of cross-asset price comovement and its relationship with the recent rounds of “extraordinary intervention” from the US Federal Reserve. The results show that, even after controlling for the preceding financial crisis, asset return volatility, investor risk perceptions, and channels of monetary stimulus, historically unrelated financial asset returns experienced abnormal changes in their conditional correlations. The strength of these cross-asset correlations is directly linked to periods of Federal Reserve interventions yet disappear when the interventions were (in fact or were perceived to be) withdrawn. Despite being studied extensively in the academic literature, no traditional intervention channels can explain the changes in cross-comovement. It is proposed that the Fed’s extraordinary stimulus caused investors to use Fed announcements as a common, low-cost information source on which they used to make common portfolio-allocation decisions. The changes in comovement during the intervention period may have reduced investor welfare for those with longer-horizon allocation strategies, those not prepared for the eventual ending of the stimulus, and for underfunded liability-optimizing portfolio managers (e.g., state pension funds).

Abstract

This study examines the investment opportunities available for individual investors in the carbon emissions market. Volume, investment correlations, location of trade, return volatility, and price discovery are examined for the Barclays carbon emissions exchange traded note (ETN) launched in July of 2008 and traded in U.S. markets. Our main findings indicate this new type of asset evidences diversification benefits for individual investors. Its main source of volatility and price discovery is the underlying European futures carbon market.

Cover of International Financial Markets
DOI
10.1108/S1574-8715(2013)13
Publication date
2013-08-28
Book series
Frontiers of Economics and Globalization
Editors
Series copyright holder
Emerald Publishing Limited
ISBN
978-1-78190-312-4
eISBN
978-1-78190-312-4
Book series ISSN
1574-8715