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Adapted dialectical behaviour therapy for male offenders with learning disabilities in a high secure environment: six years on

Catrin Morrissey (National High Secure Learning Disability Service, Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust, UK)
Bridget Ingamells (National High Secure Learning Disability Service, Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust, UK)

Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour

ISSN: 2042-0927

Article publication date: 24 January 2011

707

Abstract

Dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT) (Linehan, 1993) is a comprehensive psychological treatment that was first developed for suicidal individuals with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder. The model has successfully been used to address violence and aggression in a forensic setting (Evershed et al, 2003). The National High Secure Learning Disability Service (NHSLDS) piloted an adapted DBT programme suitable for men with mild learning/intellectual disabilities in 2004, and the programme has been developed over a period of six years. This paper describes the rationale for development of the programme, how the programme has evolved, the major modifications to mainstream DBT that it incorporates, and the challenges that remain.

Keywords

Citation

Morrissey, C. and Ingamells, B. (2011), "Adapted dialectical behaviour therapy for male offenders with learning disabilities in a high secure environment: six years on", Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Vol. 2 No. 1, pp. 8-15. https://doi.org/10.5042/jldob.2011.0024

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2011, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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