To read the full version of this content please select one of the options below:

S.A.E. National Los Angeles Aeronautic Meeting: Summaries of Papers Presented at the Meeting Held in Los Angeles, California, on October 5–9, 1954

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology

ISSN: 0002-2667

Article publication date: 1 December 1954

Abstract

Discusses some of the stability, control and operational problems arising in the design of supersonic aircraft. The changes in the flow patterns about an aerofoil as a function of Mach number are reviewed and typical patterns are given for M 0·85, 0·95, 1·05 and 1·35. This forms a basis for discussion of the following problems: wing drop which occurs near the drag rise and is the result of compressibility effects and small differences in the manufacture of the wings; ‘pitch‐up’ in which the aircraft during pull‐out after a dive or during a turn suddenly operates under a load factor considerably higher than the pilot intended. Unaccelerated stability, high landing speeds, and approach and landing rates of descent are also discussed. These problems are all studied for transonic and supersonic aircraft and the differences between the two cases are indicated. A case of severe tail buffetting is discussed which occurred when testing the after‐burner of a high thrust jet engine in the bomb bay installation of a B‐45 aircraft used as an engine test‐bed.

Citation

(1954), "S.A.E. National Los Angeles Aeronautic Meeting: Summaries of Papers Presented at the Meeting Held in Los Angeles, California, on October 5–9, 1954", Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Vol. 26 No. 12, pp. 426-429. https://doi.org/10.1108/eb032505

Publisher

:

MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1954, MCB UP Limited