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High Strength Light Alloys: A Note on Certain Problems Arising from the Adoption of New Alloys

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology

ISSN: 0002-2667

Article publication date: 1 September 1952

Abstract

THE necessity for the development of high strength structural alloys was accentuated by the rapid development of the jet engine, a power unit which brought the speed of flight to within reach of the speed of sound. This major step in engine potentiality put a new urgency on the need for high strength structural alloys to be placed at the disposal of the designer. This deficiency was diminished to a large extent by the production of the aluminium‐zinc‐magnesium‐copper alloys. Once the potentialities were realized of this type of alloy having tensile strengths equal to the low carbon steels and a strength/weight ratio substantially superior to the aluminium‐copper alloys, it found widespread application for primary aircraft structures. The approximate chemical composition of the (Al‐Zn‐Mg‐Cu) alloys is given in table i and compared with that of the Al‐Cu or duralumin type alloys.

Citation

Giles, P.G. and Kiddle, P.F. (1952), "High Strength Light Alloys: A Note on Certain Problems Arising from the Adoption of New Alloys", Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Vol. 24 No. 9, pp. 265-265. https://doi.org/10.1108/eb032203

Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1952, MCB UP Limited