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The Elementary Theory of. Stressed‐Skin Construction: Two Further Instalments of a Series on the Stressing of Modern Aeroplane Structures

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology

ISSN: 0002-2667

Article publication date: 1 August 1949

Abstract

AIRCRAFT wings, tail planes, fuselages and control surfaces have to satisfy certain mandatory requirements of stiffness. These requirements arc designed to ensure the absence of aero‐elastic troubles. They all take the form of a minimum specified limit to a stiffness, calculated or measured under the application of a definite force and constraint system. A ‘stiffness’ may be defined as the ratio of a force to its ‘corresponding’ displacement (see 5.2) and so the calculation of stiffnesses reduces itself to a ‘deflection problem’(1.1 (2)).

Citation

Hemp, W.S. (1949), "The Elementary Theory of. Stressed‐Skin Construction: Two Further Instalments of a Series on the Stressing of Modern Aeroplane Structures", Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Vol. 21 No. 8, pp. 248-251. https://doi.org/10.1108/eb031794

Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1949, MCB UP Limited