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The Elementary Theory of Stressed‐Skin Construction: Two Further Instalments of a Series on the Stressing of Modern Aeroplane Structures

W.S. Hemp, M.A. (Senior Lecturer and Deputy Head of the Department of Aircraft Design, College of Aeronautics, Cranfield.)

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology

ISSN: 0002-2667

Article publication date: 1 July 1949

Abstract

CONSIDER a fuselage or wing structure in the form of a reinforced cylindrical tube. We shall base our analysis of the equilibrium conditions of this structure upon the assumptions outlined in 2.6. In particular referring in the first place to a skin panel lying between adjacent stringers and rings, we remark that this panel carries only shear stresses and is free from external forces. It follows, as we have observed before, that this panel must therefore be in a state of uniform shearing and so must apply uniform shear flows at its lines of juncture with the adjacent panels and the reinforcing stringers and rings. The equilibrium conditions to be satisfied at a stringer‐skin joint are now clear. The panels adjacent to the stringer apply different, but uniform, shear flows, to the line of attachment. The reaction from the stringer is determined by the rate of variation of its end load, for this clearly gives the rate of load input into the stringer. Adopting a consistent sign convention for the shear flows in the several skin panels we can thus enunciate the following theorem:

Citation

Hemp, W.S. (1949), "The Elementary Theory of Stressed‐Skin Construction: Two Further Instalments of a Series on the Stressing of Modern Aeroplane Structures", Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Vol. 21 No. 7, pp. 227-230. https://doi.org/10.1108/eb031787

Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1949, MCB UP Limited