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The Jigging of Modern Airframes: A Review of Some of the Methods Used by British and Foreign Manufacturers

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology

ISSN: 0002-2667

Article publication date: 1 December 1940

Abstract

II—FUSELAGE JIGS (cont.) Girder Fuselages The girder fuselage has, in the last few years, fallen into desuetude, save for some training and light types, yet it has many very decided advantages for rapid production. Perhaps paramount among its virtues is the simplicity of the “plumbing” installations. Chief among the disadvantages is the unsuitability of fabric covering for modern high speeds, yet this can be overcome by careful attention to the method of attachment for the fabric, as may be seen from the success of the Hawker Hurricane and the Morane‐Saulnier MS 406‐C1. In the lower speed ranges the advantages should easily outweigh other considerations, particularly for training aeroplanes where rapid repair on the spot is essential. Again, the success of the de Havilland Tiger Moth, North American Harvard and the Westland Lysander, not to mention the many American light aeroplanes with tubular fuselages speak well in favour of the system.

Citation

(1940), "The Jigging of Modern Airframes: A Review of Some of the Methods Used by British and Foreign Manufacturers", Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Vol. 12 No. 12, pp. 375-382. https://doi.org/10.1108/eb030726

Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1940, MCB UP Limited